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^aruaro College iLilmini 




ERNEST BLANEY DANE 

(ClnssofiSgi) 



OF BOSTON 



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IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 



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IRISH 



ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES, 



BY 



SIR WILLIAM BETH AM, F. S. A., L. S. 

wk% R« !• A» A* R« S» Z« S» 



ULSTER KING OF ARMS OF ALL IRELAND, KEEPER OF THE REC0RD8 OF 

THE LATE PARLIAMENT OF IRELAND, DEPUTY KEEPER 

OF THE RECORDS IN BIRMINGHAM TOWER, IN HIS 

MAJESTY'S CASTLE OF DUBLIN, &C. &C. 



PART. II. 



" Si deveritate gcandalum sumitur, utilias perinittitur nasci scandalum, quam 

at Teritas relinquatur." 

/ ST. AUGU8TINB. 



DUBLIN : 

WILLIAM CURRY, JUN. AND CO. 

AND HODGES AND M' ARTHUR i 

LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN, AND GREEN, LONDON ; 

DANIEL LIZARS, EDINBURGH. 

1827. 






JUL 1 1^16^ 



UfjRA"^. 



<ij_ 



JW 



Bentham and Hardy, Printers, 
r Cecilia-street, Dublin. 



CONTENTS. 



P*ee. 

Book of Armagh — Preliminary Discourse on the 
History of St. Patrick — Palladius, the second Pa- 
trick, and the Irish Church, &c. &c 243 

Translation of the life of St. Patrick, from the Book 

of Armagh 305 

Anonymous Notices, from same 345 

Sayings of St. Patrick, from same ........ 346 

Tirechan's Collections, from same. 348 

Summary of Aidus, from same 403 

Book of the Angel, from same 407 

Confession of St. Patrick, from same 417 

His Letter to Coroticus, from Sir James Ware .... 433 

Appendix, containing the original Latin of the Book 
of Armagh. 






^™ °»t<>X 



<*\ 



JUL 1 1916 J 

4&« 



JW 



Bentham and Hardy, Printer*, 
r Cecilia-street, Dublin. 



•\ 



V 



CONTENTS. 



Paee. 

Book of Armagh — Preliminary Discourse on the 
History of St. Patrick — Palladius, the second Pa- 
trick, and the Irish Church, &c. &c 243 

Translation of the life of St. Patrick, from the Book 

of Armagh 305 

Anonymous Notices, from same 345 

Sayings of St. Patrick, from same ........ 346 

Tirechan's Collections, from same. 348 

Summary of Aidus, from same 403 

Book of the Angel, from same 407 

Confession of St. Patrick, from same 417 

His Letter to Coroticus, from Sir James Ware .... 433 

Appendix, containing the original Latin of the Book 
of Armagh. 



PLATES. 



Page. 

PLATE X. Emblems of the four Evangelists, at the 

beginning of the Gospel of St. Mat- 
thew, in the Book of Armagh 243 

XL Fac similes from the Book of Armagh : — 

No. 1 . The commencement of the Apo- 
calypse — Apocalypsi Jesu Christ?) 
$c. 

No. 2. The commencement of the Gos- 
pel of St. Matthew— Liber generati- 
onis Jesu Christ i, fyc. 

No. 3. The Pater Noster, in antient 
Greek Capitals — Pater Noster qui 
es in Ccelis, fyc. 

No. 4. A Passage written in the pre- 
sence of Brien Boiromhe, in 1006. 

To face Title. 

XII. Fac similes from the Book of Armagh : — 
No. 1. Commencement of the Gospel 

of St. Mark — Initium Evangelii, fyc. 
No 2. The Irish passage concerning 

Aidus's dedication of his collections. 
No. 3. Autograph of Florence Maire. 
No. 4. From the first chapter of St. 

Matthew's Gospel — XPI autem ge- 

neratio sit. tyc. 201 



IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 




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ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES, 



i. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH 



PRELIMINARY. DISCOURSE. ■ 

X HE Psalter of Columbkill, the Book of 
Dimma, and the Book of Armagh, are national 
muniments, of which all Irishmen may be 
justly proud, may exultingly produce as 
evidences of the civilization and literary ac- 
quirements of. their country, at an age, when 
other nations of; Europe, if not in utter igno- 
rance and barbarism, were in their primers, 
their very horn-books. 

The Psalter of Columbkill, written in the 

sixth century, is probably the oldest Irish MS. 

extant. The four gospels of Dimma, written 

i i 



244 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

early in the seventh century, is, perhaps, the 
oldest in the pure Irish character.* 

The Book of Armagh, also written in the 
seventh century, in the pure Irish charac- 
ter, mixed with the Greek, although of some- 
what later date than the others, contains 
evidence so unequivocal and unquestionable 
of the history of that early period as to 
give it a paramount interest and value. The 
period to which it refers, has hitherto been 
enveloped in obscurity, rendered more dark 
by fabricated legends, invented for the express 
purposes of deception, to make posterity 
believe they saw the substance, while a sha- 
dow was exhibited to their contemplation, to 
give to Palladius the name and character of 
Patricius, and to obliterate the recollection of 
the latter from the minds and attachment of the 
grateful and affectionate Irish, by giving his 

* From the writing of the Visitation of the Sick, in Dimmds 
book, and the entry written in the presence of Brien 
Boiroimhe, in the year 1006> in the hook of Armagh, 
being precisely the same character, and differing in ioto 
from that of the remainder of the MSS. commencing on 
a spare blank part of the vellum, at the end of the 
gospel of St. Ltike, and continued on an inserted mem- 
brane, I consider it to have been written long after the 
book itself, viz. at the end of the tenth or beginning of the 
eleventh century. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 245 . 

name to a phantom, raised at the end of the 
sixth, or beginning of the seventh century, for 
- Palladius, or any of his • successors, were not 
called Patrick, nor had the fraud been contem- 
plated until that period. It was, indeed, a 
master-stroke of policy. We have now a key 
which opens the door, and discovers the clue 
to all the incongruities and contradictions 
which have perplexed the learned, respecting 
St. Patrick, by shewing us that the Roman 
writers called many mm Patrick, who while 
living never bore the name. The place of his 
birth, his relations, his uncle St. Martin, in 
fact, his almost ubiquity, are accounted for, 
which so long has been an historical har- 
lequinade. But I am going prematurely into 
the case, let us return. The book of Armagh 
also, contains evidence of learning, beyond 
even the most sanguine hopes and expectations 
"of the most patriotic Irishman; it exhibits an 
acquaintance with the Greek as well as the 
Latin tongue ; and more, in it will be found 
evidence to convince the most sceptical, that 
Ireland, in the seventh century, was a cul- 
tivated and civilized country, and had been 
so for centuries; that Christianity had long 
before enlightened her people, and that not 
in isolated and individual cases, whtre its pro- 
fessors shrunk from its avowal, not here and 



246 ' IKISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

there in a monastery, on the coast, or in forti- 
fied places, surrounded by paganism, and per- 
secution, like an oasis in the desart ; no, Ire- 
land was then, and long had been, a Christian 
nation, governed by wholesome laws, which 
protected the lives and properties of its inha- 
bitants, and respected and shielded the 
stranger. 

Hitherto, we have " looked through a glass 
darkly ,•" we have heard of the civilization of 
antient Scotia, but the medium of legends, 
traditions, and fabrications, through which it 
has reached our ears, has been so corrupt, 
that, if we were even assured of the truth, it 
was associated with so much falsehood, that 
we hesitated to receive the palatable, on ac- 
count of the disgusting vehicle in which it 
was involved. So much impurity had ob- 
scured the pure gold, nay, hid it for ages, 
that it baffled the most eminent, skilful, and 
learned historical chemists, to develope its 
natural beauty and purity. 

Notwithstanding the powerful exertions of 
Ware and Usher, they did not supply us with 
a rational theory, or any feasible or even 
satisfactory account of the early history of 
Ireland, 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 24? 

These learned and able writers rather col- 
lected evidence, than drew conclusions, or 
arranged any thing like a continuous histo- 
ry ; they published essays on particular sub- 
jects, and printed antient historical tracts, 
and thus left us but the raw materials. — 
Usher's Ecclesiastical History, is a work of 
immense labour and research, but it is only for 
the learned — to the public, the million, it is a 
sealed book. It is much to be lamented that 
this able work has not been translated, as it is 
calculated to do much good, were it made ac- 
cessible to all. 

It is very singular, that both Ware and 
Usher saw, and extracted from the Book 
of Armagh, and yet neither appear to have 
made themselves acquainted with its most im- 
portant contents, or looked beyond those pas- 
sages they thought most proper to publish. 
Those selected by Usher refer to Ultan and 
Tirechan the Bishops ; and are to be found in 
pp. 818, 963, 964, and 1067. De Britannica- 
rum Ecclesiarum Primordiis, Edit. Dublin, 
1639. Sir James Ware published the Confes- 
sion of St. Patrick, in 1656, in the " Opuscula 
S. Patricio adscripta" from this very book ; 
and in his annotations, mentions certain notes 
and sentences therein, which proves he had 



248 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

examined it ; but it must have been in a very 
superficial manner, as he says it contained the 
entire version of the Scriptures, while it has but 
the New Testament, and he is altogether silent 
as to its most valuable historical contents. 
Sir James, on all difficult points, considers it 
prudent to leave them to the decision of the 
reader's judgment, which is certainly modest, 
but it deprives us of the opinion of an able 
and judicious antiquary, 

I am fully aware of the danger I incur of 
critical castigation, by the promulgation of opi- 
nions and conclusions, now advanced for the 
first time. I have taken a view altogether 
novel with respect to the antient church of 
Ireland, and St. Patrick's mission, and indeed 
as to the History of Ireland generally. I 
found it impossible to reconcile the parts of the 
history, they will not form a whole, so com- 
pletely did they contradict and destroy each 
other's testimony. It appeared impossible to 
question the fact of St. Patrick's existence, at 
some time or other, so much is his name mix- 
ed up with the traditions of ages ; yet, until 
now, I could discover no unquestionable evi- 
dence of him 9 of documents written previous 
to the 10th or 11th century. The Book of 
Armagh supplies us with evidence of the 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 240 

7th, and that of the most satisfactory charac- 
ter, and puts the question at rest as to his ex- 
istence* Hitherto we had almost rejected him 
as repugnant to testimony above suspicion : 
Prosper, who wrote in the 5th century, is si- 
lent ; Bede mentions him not, if we except the 
Martyrology, but supplies us with evidence 
of the existence of Christianity in Ireland, 
before the alleged and generally received 
period of his mission, and also a statement 
from Colman of the pretensions of his country- 
men to greater antiquity of Christianity, who 
likewise sets up the ecclesiastical usages of the 
Scots as more correct than the Roman ; who is 
moreover, in some measure, taunted by his 
adversaries with presumption, for considering 
his corner of the world to be wiser than the 
Universal Church. But it is useless to waste 
words and arguments, to establish a conceded 
fact, Colgan, and all the other Romish wri- 
ters, allow the previous existence of Chris- 
tianity to the mission of Palladius, to have 
been proved by the evidence of Prosper, Bede, 
Ado Viennensis, Freculphus Lexoniensis, In<- 
gulphus Croylandiensis , Hermanus Contractus, 
Marianus Scotus, Florence of Worcester, Henry 
of Huntingdon, and many others, and mention 
Albeus, Declan, Ibarus, and Kiaran, as four 
eminent bishops, previous to the mission of 



250 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

PaUadius. Still, most unaccountably do these 
writers strenuously insist on the conversion of 
the Scots by their missionary, in the teeth of 
their previous admissions, and the lives and 
actions of their Patrick, speak of the perfect 
novelty of Christianity among the Heathen 
Scots. They seem quite blind to the incon- 
sistency and incongruity of their statements 
with each other. 

The truth is, as will be shewn in the fol- 
lowing pages, that the first Apostle of Ire- 
land, Patrick, the Roman Briton, introduced 
Christianity into Ireland centuries before the 
year 430, and PaUadius was truly sent to the 
Scots believing in Christ, a nation of Christians, 
where a Christian Church had long flourished 
in apostolic purity ; and Celestine, on the 
spread of the Pelagian heresy in the British 
Islands, sent PaUadius on a mission to eradi- 
cate that error. 

I shall now proceed to a description and 
history of this venerable relique. 

The Book of Armagh is a MS. on vellum, 
of the small quarto size, eight inches high, six 
inches wide, and about three inches thick. It 
is fairly written in columns on both sides of the 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 251 

membranes, in the Irish character, mixed with 
Greek capitals, and is in fine preservation. — 
It contains 221 membranes and 442 pages : it 
is every where perfect, excepting the first 
membrane, part of the Gospel of St. Matthew, 
and a few pages which have suffered so much 
by attrition as to deface the writing. 

It has been bound in oak boards, covered 
with black leather, and was formerly covered 
either with silver plates, or pins in the figure 
of a cross surmounted by a saltire surrounded 
by a border. The stumps of the silver pins 
still remain, and are very thick and strong — 
It appears to have had a previous covering of 
crimson leather, similar to the old Turkey, 
part of which still remains, and its front was 
fastened with brass loops— a part of one is still 
extant. 

I wished much to have given a plate of the 
singular case in which this MS. has been 
preserved ; it is of thick black leather, with 
raised ornaments of animals and grotesque de- 
vices ; but I had not time to accomplish it 
without postponing the publication for another 
year. It has a very antient brass lock with a 
hasp, part of which still remains, and had ori- 
ginally eight brazen staples, which passed 

&k 



252 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

through the lid or cover, and appears to have 
had a bolt or pin pass through them and 
under the hasp, to fasten by the lock in a man- 
ner similar to the small portmanteau or valise 
of modern times. 

Archbishop Usher, in his work, " De Pri- 
mordiis Ecclesiarum Britannicarum," pp. 818, 
963, 964, and 1067, published 1639, gives ex- 
tracts from this work, but does not, as far as 
1 have been able to discover, give any history 
of the book itself. 

In 1656, Sir James Ware published a small 
tract, under the following title : — 

" S. Patricio, qui Hibernos ad Jidem Christi 
convertit, adscripta Opuscula. Quorum aliqua 
nunc primum, ex antiquis MSS. codicibus in 
lucem emissa sunt ; reliqua recognita ; omnia, 
notis ad rem historicam et antiquariam spec- 
tantibus, illustrata. Opera et studio Jacobi 
Warcei, Eq. Aur. Londoni, 1656." 

In this curious, valuable, and now very rare 
tract, Sir James gives the Confessio of St. 
Patrick, from the Book of Armagh, but col- 
lated and enlarged from the Cotton MS. and 
those in the cathedral of Salisbury. He marks 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 253 

with inverted commas, the passages from the 
latter authorities. Dr. O'Conor, has also pub- 
lished this document in his Prolegomena, Pars 
I. p. cvii. without, however, the caution of Sir 
James Ware's inverted commas. In his an- 
notations on this document, Sir James gives 
the following observations : — 

" The MS. of the church of Armagh, above 
mentioned, contains besides the Confessio of 
St. Patrick, the Holy Bible, from the . version 
of St. Jerome, and a very antient copy of 
Sulpitius Severus, concerning the life of St. 
Martin of Tours. It was formerly so highly 
prized, that the family of Mac Mayer held 
lands from the see of Armagh by the tenure 
of the safe keeping of this MS. Great vene- 
ration for this book was excited in the vulgar 
mind, by the supposition that it was written 
by the hand of St. Patrick himself, and cer- 
tainly, at the end of his confessioji, these 
words are added, " Thus far is the volume 
which Patrick wrote with his own hand." and 
afterwards, " On the 17th of March, Patrick 
was translated to heaven" However^ from the 
nature of the character, there is sufficient 
proof that it is not an autograph, but was 
transcribed at a much later date." 



254 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

With deference to so great a scholar and 
antiquary and to the character of a man I so 
highly venerate, I cannot avoid saying, the 
observations of Sir James on this MS. were 
very superficial, as the reader will find on 
examining the real catalogue of its contents ; 
the article he extracted, the Confessio, purports 
to be no more than a transcript from the real 
autograph of St. Patrick, as is evident from 
the side-notes, which occur of incertus liber hie, 
indicating that the scribe could not be respon- 
sible for the true meaning, on account of the 
difficulty in reading the original. The note 
" Thus far the volume, $c" was evidently 
copied from the original, and did not pretend 
to be the autograph itself. 

The following description of this MS. from 
the catalogue of the learned Humphrey 
Lhwyd, was transmitted to Dr. O'Conor, by 
the kindness of the Right Hon. Charles Wil- 
liams Wynne : — 

" This MS. beyond all doubt, is very an- 
tient, whether it be or be not, partly in the 
hand-writing of St. Patrick himself, (as is 
stated at the bottom of page 24.) but ap- 
pears very likely to me to be of a later 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 255 

# 

age, and perhaps, it is the text of the gos- 
pels which St. Bernard, in the life of St. 
Malachy, reckons among the muniments of 
the see of Armagh, and relates to have been 
the text of St. Patrick himself. By Usher 
and Ware, it is called the Book of Armagh, 
but by the Irish the Book of the Canons of St. 
Patrick; thus called (as I think) from the 
Canons of the Evangelists, agreeing with one 
another, begun in page 26. This book was 
formerly held in great estimation by the an- 
tient Irish, so much so, that the family com- 
monly called Mac Maor, in English Mac Mayre, 
had their name from the custody of this book. 
For Moor in Irish, is keeper ; and Maor-na- 
Ccanon, is keeper of the Canons ; all that 
family were cojoamonly so called, and they 
formerly held from the See of Armagh eight 

townlands in the county of — , called 

the lands of Rally maire, by the tenure of the 
safe keeping of this book ; in whose hands it 
remained during many ages, until Florence 
Mac Mayre went to England in the year 
1680. That he should give evidence (which 
I should doubt the truth of) against Oliver 
Plunket, D.D. the Roman Catholic prelate of 
Ireland, who undeservedly, as is believed, 
was executed. But Mayre being deficient of 
money at his death, this manuscript was left as 



256 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

a pledge for five pounds ; fortunately, it after- 
wards came to the hands of Arthur Brownlow, 
Esq. who, with considerable labour, placed 
the loose leaves in their proper order, and put 
folios at the top of each page, and other 
marks in the margin to distinguish the chap- 
ters, and had the leaves so arranged in their 
original binding, (as it now appears) and 
caused them to be preserved together with a 
certain bull of the Roman pontiff found with 
the same. It contains fragments of lives of 
St. Patrick, written by divers authors, for the 
most part anonymous. It also contains the 
confession of St. Patrick, or as I would more 
correctly say, his Epistle to the Irish, then 
lately converted to the faith. It also contains 
the epistle from St. Jerome to Pope Damasus, 
written "by way of preface to his version. 
There are also ten canons which shew the 
concordance of the gospels with each other, 
and also short causes or interpretations of 
each of the gospels, and the New Testament, 
of the version, I think, of St. Jerome, in which 
is found the epistle to the Laodiceans, which 
is mentioned in that of the Colossians. In the 
first epistle of St. John, the verse is wanting. 
" There are three which bear witness in heaven, 
&c." There are also explanations of the 
Hebrew names found in each of the gospels, 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 257 

together with many arguments of various 
authors to each gospel, and also, others refer- 
ing to most of the epistles. At the end is the 
life of St. Martin of Tours, uncle (as is al- 
ledged) of St. Patrick, written by Sulpicius 
Severus. Note. — That in the gospel of St. 
Matthew, there are wanting, as I suppose, 
four folios, that is from the twenty-ninth verse 
of the fourteenth chapter to the fourth verse of 
the twenty-first chapter. The Epistles of the 
apostles are not placed in the order in which 
they are found at this day." — OP Conor, EpisL 
Nuncupatorium lvi. 

Such is the account given by the learned 
Sir James Ware, and Humphrey Lhwyd, of 
this curious and valuable MS. which identifies 
and completes its history. 

Lhwyd, however, could not have critically 
examined the book, he was too learned in an- 
tient writing, to have given so imperfect a 
sketch of its contents, which are of so extra- 
ordinary a character. 

It was written by Aidus, bishop of Slepten,* 
who died about the year 698, and dedicat- 
ed to Segenius, bishop of Armagh and his 



* Now Sletty in the Queen! *s county. 



268 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

successors, with whom it was afterwards de- 
posited. 

Its contents are as follows : — 

The first membrane is wanting ; from p. 2 to 
8, is the life of St. Patrick, very nearly simi- 
lar to that published by Colgan, as the writing 
of Probus ; p. 9, first column is an account of 
some acts and sayings of St. Patrick, by an 
anonymous author. 

9 

The second column commences the life or 
acts of St. Patrick, collected by Tirechan, 
bishop of Meath, as is said, who lived at the 
end of the seventh century. He commences 
thus, " Tirechan, the bishop, wrote this from the 
mouth and book of Ultan, the bishop, whose pupil, 
or disciple, he was. 

After which, to folio 19, are a collection of 
memoranda from various authorities, on the 
subject of St. Patrick and the apostolic city of 
Armagh, and among them is a memorandum 
in a more modern hand, stating that that par- 
ticular paragraph, was written in the pre- 
sence of Brien, Emperor of the Scots.* 

* This was Brien Boiroruhe. See fac simile of this jias- 
sage plate xi. No. 4. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH, 259 

At page 19, is the recapitulation of Aidus, 
and his account of the authorities he had con- 
sulted, and the value he placed upon their evi- 
dence, with the " Book of the Angel" which 
contains certain privileges of the city of Ar- 
magh, her right to the primacy, &c. &c. 

In page 21, is the confession of St. Patrick, 
at the foot end of which are the following 
words : — 

w 

u Hucusque volumen quod Patricius manu 
conscripsit sua. Septima-decima Martii die 
translatus est Patricius ad coelos." 

" Thus far is the volume that Patrick wrote 
with his own hand. On the 1 1th day of March 
he was translated to the heavens" 

Page 25. The letter of St. Jerome to Pope 
, Damasus, generally printed before his version 
of the New Testament, with which however 
it differs, both as to its language and extent, 
this letter containing more than is printed in 
the Vulgate. 

Page 26. The first canon in which is pointed 
out the passages where the four Gospels agree 



260 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

with each other, and is followed by nine 
other canons. 

Page 29. Commences the short statements 
of the contents of the gospels, called Breves 
Causae, which occupy five pages ; after mem- 
brane 31, commence explanations of the He- 
brew names, which occupy the first column 
of page 32. The second is the Argumentum 
Matthei, or preface to the gospel of St. Mat- 
thew, on the back of which are the emblems 
of the four Evangelists, of which plate X. is 
a fac simile. Then follows, in page 33, the 
gospel of St. Matthew, which occupies from 
page 33 to 52. On page 53 is the Argu- 
mentum Marci, or argument to the gospel 
of St. Mark, with a short explanation of He- 
brew names ; on the back of which is the 
lion of St. Mark. — (See plate X.) 

On folio 54, commences the gospel of St. 
Mark, which ends in folio 67 ; where com- 
mences, at the bottom of the second column, 
the argument to the gospel of St. Luke, which 
ends at the bottom of the first column of the 
succeeding folio 68. The second is occupied 
by an explanation of the proper names. On 
the back of this folio is the calf, the emblem 
of St. Luke. — (See plate X.) 




■J 




u<wK»*-m>u 11. 



_ JjW madia*- i*V>*eTe&tS<*t*i& 
jmipt' -,&4**ti»**r %«*« cut 

-J7 }^- w <j,i£*. 





MMirk.fiKMi 



3^^m«" 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 261 

On folio 69, coinmen,ctes the gospel of St. 
Luke, which ends at folio 89: on the back 
of which is the argument to the gospel x>f St. 
John, and an explanation of proper names. 

* • * ■ * " 

■"'- On the face* 1 of folio .90, commences the 
gospel according to St. John ; at the bottom 
of this page is his emblem, the eagle, (see 
plate X.) It ends in folio 103. On the back 
of this page is the autograph of Florence 
Maire, as follows : — " Liber Florentini Maire, 
June 29, 1629," of which see the fac simile 
in plate XII. No. 3. 

On the front of folio 105, is the prologue of 
St. Hilary, to the epistles of the apostles ; 
and on the back of the same folio is the pro- 
logue of Pelagius to all the epistles ; and about 
the middle of the first column of the face of 
folio 106, is the prologue of Pelagius, to the 
epistle of .St. Paul to the Romans, which 
occupies the remainder of the face, and the 
first column of the back. The second co- 
lumn on the back is occupied with observa- 
tions oi* certain texts of St. Paul's epistles. On 
the back of folio 107, is the argument of Pela- 
gius to the epistle to the Romans. The epistle 
commences in p. 108, and ends p. 115, where 
commences, on the second column, on the face, 



262 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

with an argument, the first epistle to the Co- 
rinthians, which ends on the first column of 
the face of the 122d folio. On the second 
column of which commences the second 
epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians, which 
ends at the bottom of the second page of folio 
126 ; where commences the epistle to the 
Galatians, which is preceded by an argument 
of St. Jerome, and also, one by Pelagius, and 
ends at the bottom of the first column of the 
second page, of folio 129, where commences, 
with an argument by Pelagius, the epistle to 
the Ephesians, which ends about the middle 
of the second column of the first page, of folio 
182 ; where commences the epistle to the 
Philippians, which also has an argument, and 
ends at the second page of folio 133, at the 
bottom of which commences the argument of 
Pelagius, to the first epistle to the Thessalo- 
nians, which begins in the next page 134, and 
ends in the second page of folio 135 ; where 
commences the argument of Pelagius to the 
second epistle to the Thessalonians, which 
follows, and ends in the first column of the 
second page of folio 1 36 ; where, with an ar- 
gument by Pelagius, commences the Epistle to 
the Colossians, which ends at the bottom of 
the first column of the first page of folio 138; 
at the top of the second column commences 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 263 

the epistle to the Laodiceans, which has this 
preface, " Ineipit epistolam ad Laodicenses 
sed Hirunumus earn negat esse Pauli" This 
epistle occupies part of one column ; at the 
bottom commences the argument of Pelagius y 
to the first epistle to Timothy, which com- 
mences at the top of the next page, and ends 
at the bottom of the first column, of the first 
page of folio 140; where commences the 
second epistle to Timothy, which ends near 
the bottom of the second column of the first 
page of folio 141 ; where is the argument of 
Pelagius to the epistle to Titus, which ends in 
the second column of the first page of folio 
142 ; where commences the epistle to Phile- 
mon, with an argument by Pelagius, and ends 
in the next page, where commences the argu- 
ment to the epistle to the Hebrews, but by 
whom does not appear. The epistle to the 
Hebrews occupies from page 143 to 148 inclu- 
sive, where is a blank membrane. 

Page 150 commences with the epistle of 
James, without any argument, which ends with 
folio 151. 

Page 152 commences the first epistle of Pe- 
ter, and ends at folio 153 ; at page 154 com- 
mences the second epistle of Peter, which ends 



264 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

near the top of the second column of the first 
page of folio 155, when commences the first 
epistle of John, which ends in the first page of 
the 157th folio, where commences the second 
epistle general of John, which ends in the 
next page, which also includes the third epis- 
tle of John. The epistle of Jude occupies 
the next folio. 

The front of folio 159 is blank — at the back 
is the argument to the Apocalypse, which com- 
mences at folio 160, and ends at folio 170. 

The Acts of the Apostles commences at 
folio 171, which ends at the first page of folio 
190. 

At page 191 commences the first book of the 
life of St Martin of Tours, by Sulpicius. The 
second book of which commences at the se- 
cond page of folio 200, and the third at page 
214, and ends at the second page of folio 219 ; 
where commences the epistle of Sulpicius to 
the Gauls, and ends in next page ; where com- 
mences an epistle of Severus to Aurelius, 
which ends in the folio 221, on which is a very 
singular prayer. 

I have been rather prolix in my description 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 263 

of the MS., my apology is the great impor- 
tance of its identity and genuine character, on 
which its sole value depends* 

In printing I have followed the arrange- 
ments of the articles as they stand in the Book 
of Armagh, although in chronological prece- 
dence, the Confessio of St. Patrick is certainly 
entitled to the first place, as the most antient 
document, yet it is placed last. The Summary 
of Aldus follows the Collections of Tirechan, 
and precedes the Confessio, and I conceive his 
remark on the doubtful character of the testimo- 
ny was intended only to apply to the preceding 
matter ; he certainly had no doubt of the exist- 
ence of Patrick, although he could not recon- 
cile the conflicting testimony he found respect- 
ing him. 

To follow the Confession, I have added a 
translation of the epistle of Patrick to Coro- 
ticus, although that document does not appear 
in the Book of Armagh, because it bears the 
marks of being the genuine production of the 
first Patrick ; its style is the same, it quotes from 
the Septuagint, and, with Sir James Ware, I 
think every one who reads it will judge it to 
be the production of the same pen as the Con- 
fessio. It supplies valuable testimony on the 



266 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

subject under consideration, which is not con- 
fined to the description of the antient MS. 
but is an attempt to elucidate those very inte- 
resting periods of Irish history. 

The documents themselves, suggest the di- 
vision for the purposes of discussion, which I 
shall follow, namely, those which refer to the 
first Patrick, and those which relate to Palla- 
dius and the missionaries from Rome of the 5th 
century. There are some, however, in which 
the acts of both are so jumbled together as to 
render it impossible to separate them. And 
in order to prevent confusion, I shall, in the 
remarks hefeafter made, apply the name of 
Patrick only to the apostle of Ireland, who 
first introduced Christianity, and shall call the 
missionary of Celestine in 430, and his im- 
mediate successors, Palladius, or the Roman 
Patrick. 

This is absolutely necessary to the rightly 
understanding of this intricate subject, which 
has been hitherto obscured by calling so many 
individuals by the same name, and attributing 
to one person, the acts of many living in pe- 
riods remote from each other ; as the antients 
confused history by attributing the acts of so 
many heroes to Hercules. I shall now at- 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 267 

tempt to unravel .this intricate skein, by the 
simple process of allotting to each his own 
acts, and fixing the real periods at which they 
flourished ; for it is only by patiently arrang- 
ing, and comparing dates, and evidences, 
supplied in antient writers, with each other, 
we can ever arrive at the truth of his- 
tory. 

It will be necessary to my purpose, to intro- 
duce also, the evidence of other authorities 
beside the before-mentioned, to prove the ex- 
istence of Christianity in Ireland, previous to 
the fifth century, and to illustrate the periods 
after the mission of Palladius. 

In this attempt, I shall, therefore, first 
proceed to produce and remark upon the evi- 
dence of the existence of a pure Christian 
church in Ireland, previous to the fifth centu- 
ry, and then on the apostle who first intro- 
duced Christianity among the Scots. 

We have the existence of Christianity, and 

even of monastic establishments in Ireland, 

near a century before 432, clearly proved 

by the venerable, learned, and indefatigable 

Dr. O'Conor, in his Prolegomena, p. lxxviii. 

He says, " That the institution of monachism 

m m 






268 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

was introduced into Ireland, almost a whole 
century before the coming of St. Patrick, 
appears by what is stated of Ccelestius, an 
Irishman, and the fellow-labourer of Pela- 
gius, who, as Gennadius writes, dedicated 
himself from his youth to a monastery. (De 
Script. Illust. c. 44.) This work is proved by 
Baronius, Norris, and others, to have been 
written before the year 493. " For it pleased 
the Most High, that St. Athanasius, driven 
from Egypt by the Arians, promulgated 
about the year 336, the monastic life, which 
to this time, had been considered disgraceful 
" in the west by the Scots, Attacotts, and other 
" barbarians, who laid waste the Roman Em- 
" pire. Peter, his successor, with the Egyp- 
" tian monks, the companions of his flight, 
" brought with them into Europe, the life of 
" St. Anthony, written by himself, and like- 
" wise that of Pachomius. The Romans being 
" at that time annoyed by the barbarians, had 
" monachism in such estimation, that many, 
" influenced by his example, meditated soli- 
" tude, and Pamachius from a senator, be- 
" came the first western monk in the first 
" city." 

That bishops from the British islands, 
were at the council of Sardis, in 347, ap- 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 269 

pears from the apology of St. Athanasius 
against the Arians, and St. Chrisostom about 
the year 388, has these words concerning 
the British islands :— 






(4 



The British islands, (i. e. Albion andlerne) 
situated outside the Mediterranean sea, in the 
ocean, have felt the power of the divine 
" word, for there churches are founded, and 
u altars erected." And again, in his discourse 
on the advantage of reading the Scriptures. 
u Whether you bring yourself to the ocean, or 
u to those British islands, or navigate the 
" Euxine sea, or go to the south-west regions, 
you will every where hear all people dis- 
cussing philosophically, those things which are 
found in the Scriptures, differing in tongues, 
" but not in faith." Likewise, in his homily 
on the second Epistle to the Corinthians, " To 
" whatever church you shall have entered, 
" whether among Moors or in the British is- 
lands, you will hear John crying out, that it 
is not lawful for you to have thy brother 
" Philip's wife." 

It would be easy to collect evidence to the 
the same effect, from the writings of Hilary, 
Jerome, Theodoretus, and other antient fathers, 
but I consider quite enough has been cited, to 






270 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

prove the existence of monachism in the 
islands, and consequently in Ireland, as one of 
them, in the third century. 

Let us now proceed to the consideration of 
two documents of the first importance in the 
elucidation of the history of Ireland and its 
antient Church ; in fact, the most genuine and 
positive evidences of the existence of St. 
Patrick and of the faith he taught. The 
Confessio of St. Patrick and his Letter to Co- 
roticus. The first was copied into the Book 
of Armagh, from the original in Patrick's own 
writing, his own autograph/ — and is now 
published from a MS. nearly twelve hundred 
years old ; the last from Sir James Ware's, 
and Dr. O'Conor's publications, which were 
accurately collated with antient MSS, In them 
will be found, no arrogant presumption, no 
spiritual pride, no pretension to superior sanc- 
tity, no maledictions of magi, or rivers, be- 
cause his followers were drowned in them, 
no veneration for, or adoration of reliques, no 
consecrated staffs, or donations of his teeth 
for reliques, which occur so frequently in the 
lives, and also in the collections of Tirechan, 
referring to Palladius, not to Patrick. In these 
documents appears the pure apostolic Christian 
minister, the humble devout missionary, anxi- 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 271 

ous to promote the salvation of his fellow men, 
imbued indeed with great zeal, and relating 
facts, which he attributes to the intervention of 
a particular providence , but which, on exami- 
nation, are to be accounted for by natural 
causes. It is not necessary, however, to de- 
fend our Saint for believing in a particular 
providence, and the intervention of that super- 
intending power, even in common cases, much 
less, when the important object was the conver- 
sion of a nation; nor can there be any imputa- 
tion against him for credulity or fanaticism, 
for believing one of the most important truth of 
Christianity. No — Patrick's writings rescue 
his character from an unmerited stigma; he 
lived in a pur© age, preached a pure faith, and 
was worthy to be ranked with those truly 
pious and exemplary characters, the earliest 
fathers of the Christian Church, the succes- 
sors of the apostles. Both documents are elo- 
quent and breathe a truly Christian spirit 
of humility, of piety, and devotedness to the 
Will of God ; and, as Dimma says, such an 
anxiety for the sancttfication of souls, and so 
much love for truth, as to convince us of his 
inflexible integrity, and to fix him in the first 
place of our affectionate regard. I shall not de- 
tract from his merit J>y abridging the Confessio 
farther than in reciting from it what may be 



272 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

considered the symbol of his faith, which I 
may boldly assert, differs not from the Church 
of England : — 

" From which time I could not be silent, 
nor, indeed, did God cease to bless me with 
many acts of kindness, and so great was the fa- 
vour he thought me worthy, in the land of 
my captivity, this is my retribution, after 
my rebuking, punishment, and acknowledge- 
ment of God, I should exalt him, and confess 
his wonderful acts before every nation which 
is under the whole heaven ; because there is 
no other God, nor ever was before, nor will be 
after him, except God, the unbegotten father, 
without beginning, from whom is every begin- 
ning, possessing all things, (as we have said,) 
and his son Jesus Christ, whom we bear wit- 
ness, was always spiritually with the father ; 
inexpressibly begotten before all beginning, 
through whom visible things were made, he 
became man, and having overcome death, was 
received into heaven. And he had given to 
him all power above every name, as well of 
the inhabitants of heaven, as of the earth, and 
of the powers below, that every tongue should 
confess that Jesus Christ is Lord and God ; 
whom we believe, and whose coming we ex- 
pect, as presently about to be judge of the 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 273 

living and the dead, who will render to every 
man according to his actions, and has poured 
upon us abundantly the gift of his holy spirit, 
and the pledge of immortality — who makes us, 
who believe and are obedient, to be the sons of 
God, and joint heirs of Christ, whom we adore 
one God in the Trinity of the sacred name," 

This venerable document will be perused 
with delight by every friend to Ireland and to 
Christianity, and the name of Patrick will be 
held in due veneration and respect. 

" Its antiquity may be sufficiently proved," 
says Sir James Ware, " by the circumstance 
of the passages of Scripture being quoted from 
the Septuagint version, not from the more re- 
cent version of St. Jerome, which was not 
publickly received in St. Patrick's day" It 
might be questioned whether it proves all Sir 
James states, who argued upon the supposed 
period of St. Patrick's existence, i. e. 432. But 
looking with the lights we now possess, it proves 
much more, the version of Jerome, was the re- 
ceived version at the time of Palladius, but Pa- 
trick could know nothing of St. Jerome or his 
version, having existed long before him ; and 
now that a consistent and true history of this 
early period is brought to light, and we are able 



274 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

to distinguish between the real and the pseudo 
Patrick, the corroboration of such a document 
as this is of the first importance. 

Patrick says, that he is imperfect in many 
points, and seems fully impressed with the 
importance and Christian duty of promulgating 
truth ; and so apprehensive of exceeding the 
truth, in what he says of himself, that he 
premises his declarations with the texts of 
Scripture, which most condemn those who 
violate verity. " Thou shall destroy them who 
speak lies." " The mouth which lieth shall lose 
its life" " For every word which man shall utter, 
for that shall they render an account in the day 
of judgment " And then proceeds to account 
for his writing this epistle, which he had he- 
sitated to do before, lest he should fall under 
censure for presumption. I must refer the 
reader to the document itself, which will 
well repay the trouble of a perusal. The only 
additional remark I shall make upon it is, that 
it is the ground- work on which all the ficti- 
tious lives have been built and fabricated. 
He concludes his statement with a declaration 
of his sincerity and truth, and unlike the 
pseudo apostles, declares, that he will not re- 
count his labours, for it would be tedious, and 
that after all he was a great debtor to God. 






BOOK OP ARMAGH. 275 

Compare this simple, this beautiful and un- 
varnished tale, with the lives of Palladius and 
his followers, and it will clearly appear to an 
unprejudiced mind, that they could not relate 
to the same individual. 

There is, however, one passage, so much at 
variance with the sentiments and feelings ex- 
hibited in the other parts of the Confessio, as 
to induce a suspicion of its interpolation, 
which is that wherein he says, he made a 
hundred prayers in the day, and as many 
almost at night. This savours too much of 
the feelings and opinions of the seventh cen- 
tury, when the quantity and not the quality 
of the prayers began to be considered, and 
austerity and penance superseded repentance, 
and the visible and palpable sacrifice of the 
heathens were substituted, by the grossness and 
blind ignorance of mankind, for the full and 
sufficient sacrifice offered once for all. 

This paragraph is also particularly at va- 
riance with that wherein he says, he will not 
relate his acts, as it would be tedious and 
useless, and yet with an unaccountable incon- 
sistency, of which we can scarcely suppose him 
guilty, he proceeds to relate his making a 

hundred prayers in a day. It must be a pious 

n n 



876 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

f rand of the transcriber ; the same mind which 
dictated the preceding could never have pro- 
duced a sentence so full of selfish importance 
and spiritual pride, and so degrading to his 
Christianity, and so unlike the evident humi- 
lity of his mind. 

The epistle to Coroticus, enables us to form 
a tolerably correct idea of the era of St. 
Patrick. 

Although there can be little doubt, that this 
epistle, from the internal evidence of its style 
and language, &c. was the production of the 
same pen as the Confessio of St. Patrick, yet 
it is not free from just suspicion of interpola- 
tion and corruption. We find the version of 
the Confessio, derived from the same sources 
as this epistle, the Cotton and Salisbury MSS. 
very much added to, and is otherwise errone- 
ous and interpolated, therefore, we may just- 
ly have our suspicions of any passages in the 
letter to Coroticus, which savour of the ma- 
nufacture of later ages ; the document is, 
however, valuable as historical evidence. 

Coroticus is supposed to have been a pet- 
ty king of Wales, and his name indicates 
the idea to be correct. Caradoch was the 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 277 

name which the Romans latinized into Ca- 
ractacus, from which Coroticus differs but 
little. There were many princes of Wales 
of this name, to one of whom this letter 
was addressed. He had, it appears, made 
a predatory excursion to the coast of Ireland, 
and carried off many Christian converts as 
prisoners, and sold them to the heathen Picts 
and Scots as slaves. It would appear that 
Coroticus was a Christian, at least by pro- 
fession, or the epistle and upbraidings would 
have been inapplicable. 

Patrick, in this also, declares distinctly, that 
his mission was from heaven. " I declare, I 
most certainly think I have received what I am 
from God" 

The following observations are very re- 
markable : " With my own hand I have writ- 
ten, and dictated these words to be given and 
delivered to soldiers that they may be sent to 
Coroticus ; I do not say to my (fellow) citizens, 
nor to the pious Roman citizens, but to the 
devils citizens ; apostates, who on account of 
their evil doings and hostile acts, in the work 
of death, are the fit companions of the ensan- 
guined apostate Picts and Scots, who have 
been ever ready to shed the blood of in- 



278 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

nocent Christians, whom in numbers I have 
brought to God." In this passage Patrick 
speaks of his Jellow-citizens and Roman citi- 
zens, evidently speaking of Britain as a Roman 
province. The last Roman legion left Britain 
about the year 404, consequently, these trans- 
actions could not refer to the more advanced 
period of the fifth century, or to the acts of 
the missionary of Celestine. 

He after says, " I was free born according 
to the flesh, my father being a Decurio," or 
captain of ten, in a Roman legion ; and adds, 
that he gave up his nobility and all friends to 
preach the gospel. In the Confessio, he says, 
his father was diaconus; the transcriber pro- 
bably made an error by placing the latter 
for the former word decurio, from the ori- 
ginal, from which he copied, being defaced, 
or partly obliterated, a case which every one 
acquainted with old writings knows, is very 
common. Calphurnius, however, might have 
been both a decurion and a deacon, many in- 
stances of soldiers becoming clergymen oc- 
curred in the primitive church. It also ap- 
pears by this, that Patrick was a Roman of 
the Patrician order ; he speaks of his nobility 
and citizenship, another strong evidence of 
the period of his existence. He also speaks 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 279 

of the incursions of the Piets and Scots'. 
Again, he says, " It is the custom of the Ro- 
man and Gallic Christians to send pious per- 
sons to the Franks and other nations, with 
money to redeem the baptized captives." This 
expression is another proof that the period 
when Patrick wrote, was before the foundation 
of the kingdom of the Franks, under Phara- 
mohd in 420, at which time the Franks had 
established their dominion in Gaul, and the 
Romans and Gauls no longer sent their mes- 
sengers to redeem captives from the Franks. 
It should be observed, that all these occur- 
rences must have taken place before the year 
432, and consequently, the writer of the Con- 
fessio and the epistle to Coroticus, could not 
have been sent to Ireland by Celestine in that 
year. The venerable Bede testifies that, 
" The Scots diligently observed the precepts 
to be found in the writings of the prophets, 
the gospels, and the apostles," but they knew 
nothing of the decrees of the fathers and 
councils ; they were ignorant of any Chris- 
tianity, but that which was to be found in the 
sacred volume. The confession of faith of 
St. Patrick, is in perfect accordance. Colman, 
the bishop of Lindisfarne, (about the time 
when Aidus was writing this book of Ar- 
ttiagh) told king Ostvin, he had received 



280 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

from his fathers his faith and practice, who 
were virtuous men, beloved of God ; and that 
it was the same which was observed by the 
blessed and highly favoured St. John, and the 
churches founded by him ; which faith prevent- 
ed Dagamus, the Scottish bishop, from eating, 
or even residing in the same house, with those 
bishops whom he considered as wandering 
from the truth ; this faith also caused Col man 
and his followers, to give up his bishopric, 
and their preferment, together with the favour 
of the royal Oswyn, and all worldly conside- 
rations, rather than sacrifice the religious opi- 
nions, which they believed to be founded on 
the rock of scripture authority. 

I shall now avail myself of a translation of 
a fragment of the Brehon Law, by the late 
learned Irish scholar, Theophilus O' Flanagan, 
the original of which is amongst the MSS. in 
the library of Trinity College, Dublin. This 
translation I have obtained by the kindness of 
a valued friend, to whom it was given by Mr. 
O'Flanagan himself. It is a dissertation or 
comment on the laws, as well as the laws them- 
selves, in question and answer ; and is as fol- 
lows : — 

Q. " What are the three fundamental ordi- 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 281 

nances, from which neither law, nor judgment, 
nor reason, nor philosophers, can absolve ?" 

A. " The holy communion as contained in the 
holy Scriptures. 

" Tribute, sanctioned by three courses of 
old law, for preserving the stretch of old me- 
mory. 



" The regeneration of life by water, by which 
freedom from original sin is secured." 



Mr. O' Flanagan gives the following note on 
this passage. " Will any one deny this to be 
" the Protestant religion ? The antient Irish 
cc mention but two sacraments as necessary, 
viz. the holy communion as contained in the 
holy Scriptures j and the regeneration of life by 
water 9 whereby freedom from original sin is 
" secured : (i. e.) Baptism and the Lord's Sup- 
per. These are the two great lessons in- 
culcated by the statute, with which is, I 
may say, incorporated obedience to law and 
government. Blush, England, who would 
stigmatize Ireland as the asylum of supersti- 
tion, bigotry, and barbarism, to which you 
first gave birth, in the land of saints, wis- 
" dom, liberty, and learning." 



66 
66 
66 



66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 



282 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN R&SEARCHES. 

I cannot help feeling strongly, a participa- 
tion in the generous burst of indignation of 
the patriotic and^ learned Irishman ; if Eng- 
land did not first give birth to superstition, 
and its curses in Ireland, she certainly was. 
the willing instrument to secure their sway. 
The Roman see never completed its conquest 
over the Irish church, till it received the aid of 
the English sword, although by its secret and 
open agents it had for centuries been sapping 
its purity. 

Let us now proceed to examine and remark 
upon the life of St. Patrick, the collections of 
Tirechan, and the other documents contained 
in the book of Armagh, which refer to (the 
second Patrick) Palladius and his successors. 

I should not have considered the life of St. 
Patrick worthy consideration, if it stood alone, 
but, occupying a place in the collections of 
Aidus, and being of such high antiquity as the 
seventh century, I might perhaps be charged 
with suppression, if I omitted its insertion, and, 
although an evident fabrication, still it is im- 
portant that the public should be in possesion 
of it. 

It is substantially the same as Colgan's 2d, 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 283 

3d, 4th, and 5th lives ; some of its stories are 
to be found in the collections of Tirechan. 
This apology is necessary, lest my readers 
should turn from the detail with something 
like disgust. As evidence, it is not without 
interest, and, coupled with the caution of 
Aidus, very valuable results may be drawn 
from it. 

The Dicta Sancti Patricii, or sayings of St 
Patrick, which immediately follow the life, 
(p. 346,) contain in them strong evidence that 
the Patrick of the Roman Churchy was alto- 
gether a different and distinct personage from 
the original apostle of Ireland. They shew 
clearly that these were sayings of an individual 
sent by the Roman see, to bring the Irish 
church under Roman subjection: here we have 
it in express terms :— 

" For an age, God be thanked, you (the 
" missionary clergy) have been calling upon 
" the churches of the Scots to enter paradise in 
" union with the Roman Churchy so that, as 
" Christians? they might unite with you in the 
" same service as the Romans. 

" It behoves all the churches which follow 

o o 



284 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 



" me to use that very praiseworthy sentence, 
" Curie Lession, Ckriste Lession, for all 
" churches should sing Cyrie lession, Christe 
" lession, Deo gratias" 

These sentences could not be the sayings of 
the first Patrick, for they suppose the churches 
spoken of, to hold a different practice from the 
individual who speaks, and that for an age. 
This is direct evidence, and scarcely requires 
comment, shewing a second Patrick usurping 
the name and office of the real apostle. 

Bergomas and Sigebertus give us an eluci- 
dation of this, and enables us to say who the 
Patrick was, whose sayings are here set forth 
to influence the Irish Scots ; and in the Chroni- 
con Belgicum of Ferreolus Locrius, under the 
year 590, is the following passage : 

" Saint Gregory was the first of the Roman 
pontiffs, who inscribed himelf " servus servo- 
rum Dei " servant of the servants of God. He 
also decreed that no man, having two wives, 
should receive the holy orders of priesthood : 
whence arose the common adage — 

gra* " Holy orders shall not be given to any bi- 
gamist. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 235 

u Also, that women should not be admitted 
into the cells of monks, or become godmothers 
of the same. 

" To the fast of forty days, he added the four 
days prior, beginning from the fourth day. 

" He ordained that the mass should com- 
mence with a verse of certain psalms. 

" Also that Kyrie eleison should be said nine 
times, and Alleluya, and the Offertory, and 
the Lord's prayer, should be sung after the 
Communion, and that in the beginning of all 
canonical hours, Deus in adjutorium meum 
intende, with glory be to the Father and to the 
Son, &c. should be said."* 



* Sanctus Gregorius, primus omnium Pontificum Roman- 
orum, se " Servum Servorum Dei inscribit ; Idem lege cavet 
ut nullus bigamus sacro Presbyterii ordine iniret unde vul- 
gatum illud. 

Ordo sacer non detur ei> si guts bigamus sit. 

Item, ne mulieres monachorum cenobia ingrediantur, aut 
eorundem commatres fiant. 

Quadragessimali jejunio, quatuor priores dies, ab feria quar- 
ta inchoantes, adjunxit. 

Introitum missae, cum uno alicujus Psalmi articulo ordinavit. 

Item ut novies Kyrie eleison diceretur, alleluya et offerto- 

rium, et oratio dominica, et post communionem caoeretur ; 



286. IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHED 

Tireohan says his information was derived 
from the mouth or book of his master Ultra, 
bishop of Connor. By Usher, and Sir James 
Ware, this Ultan is called bishop of Meath, or 
Ardbraccan ; but Tirechan distinctly calls him 
Episcopus Conchuburnenses.* In Ultan's book, 
he says he found Patrick had four names, 
Magonius, Succetus, Cothirthac, and Patrick ; 
and after mentioning a few facts, which occur 
in the Confessio, and in his life, he proceeds, to 
recapitulate " his later miracles, accomplished 
after the second year of Loigaire 9 s reign" 

This is important: Loigaire became king 
A. D. 428, and his second year, 430, was the 
very year Palladium was sent by Celestineto 
the Scots. Here is a reference to former acts 
of Patrick — miracles performed by a Patrick 
before the mission of Palladius III The acts 
mentioned by Tirechan, we are told, are his 
later acts, performed after the second year 
of Loigaire, (i. e.) 430, a palpable and dis- 



■ 1 -•-!•> 



atque in priucipio omnium horarum canbnicaram " Deus in 
adjutorium meum intende cum gloria Patri &c. dioatur. Bir~ 
gamas Sigeberius. 

* Sirnames were unknown when Tirechan lived, conse- 
quently Usher must be in erfof when he supposes him to be 
called Conchuburttensfe, became** he wifc of the family of the 
b'Cdho'rs, who did then bear that nam*. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 287 

tinct admission and declaration of Tirechan, 
that there was a former Patrick, who, before 
the year 430, had performed certain acts, or at 
least those acts had been attributed to him, and 
that the acts or miracles which he had heard 
or obtained from Ultan, were his later acts. 
Then follows a further corroboration, for he 
tells us that Palladius himself, Pope Celes- 
tine's legate, or nuncio, was also called by the 
name of Patrick, (qui PaJbricius alio nomine 
appellabatur.)* Thus identifying the com- 
mencement of the later acts of Patrick, with 
the exact year of the mission of Palladius, 
according to Prosper, and proving, what I 
am convinced was the fact, that the second, 
or Roman Patrick, and Palladius were the 
same person. 

Can any reason be assigned for this extra- 
ordinary fact but one ; viz : — That a wise, 
wily, and politic pope saw the advantage of 
giving a name to this missionary, which was 
cherished and venerated by the people to 
whom he was sent ? Patrick was the name of 
the first apostle of the Scots, of him to whom 
they were indebted for the first light of the 



7-~ 



* Usher de Primordiis p. 899, and Book of Armagh, see 
Appendix. 



288 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

Goppel, and that faith to which they were so 
ardently attached, (page 349.) 

" From the passion of Christ to the death of 
Patrick, there were 436 years." This would 
fix the death of Patrick A.D. 470, twenty 
three years before the period usually admitted, 
viz. A. D. 493 ! 

€€ Loigaire reigned two, or five years, after 
the death of Patrick, and his entire reign is 
computed by us at 33 years." 

This would fix the period of Patrick's 
death A. D. 458, and Loigaire's in 461. These 
dates, no doubt, referred to different indivi- 
duals / every legate of the Roman see was af- 
terwards called Patrick ; and when Palladius 
suffered martyrdom, or was killed by the 
Scots, for his attempts to overturn their 
church, another assumed his place. 

In this compilation of Tirechan, we shall 
discover abundant evidence of the existence 
of a Christian church, previous to this mission 
of Palladius; and that he had to contend 
against Loigaire and his people, as a Christian 
king and nation, zealous for their faith, not 
against heathens, barbarians, and magi. We 



BOOR OF ARMAGH. 289 

shall find that Palladius came attended by a 
numerous staff, and an army of missionaries, 
by all the paraphernalia of the Roman church, 
that he was opposed as soon as his objects 
were ascertained, and eventually " martyrium 
passus est apud Scotos" he suffered martyr- 
dom by the hands of the Scots ; we shall also 
find, that many of his foreign followers were 
also slain by the Irish, in attempting to intro- 
duce the authority and liturgy of their church, 
at least this is Tirechan's account. 

" Patrick, indeed, came with the Gauls to 
the islands of Mac Euchor, the most eastern 
of which is still called Patrick's island, and 
with him were a multitude of holy bishops, 
presbyters, deacons, exorcists, hostiarii, and 
readers, as well as their sons, whom he or- 
dained." 

These were the various orders of the Roman 
Church, and exhibit a picture of pomp and 
circumstance, very different from the humble 
tone and Christian humility, to be found in the 
confession of the original apostle of Ireland. 

Patrick consecrated bishops, and ordained 
priests of the Franks; this could have been no 
other than Palladius, the first Patrick having 



290 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

lived long before the establishment of the 
dominion of that people in Gaul. All the con- 
flicting testimony about the family and country 
of Patrick, is now accounted for ; Palladius, or 
one of his successors, was probably the 
nephew of Martin of Tours. The first Patrick 
was a Briton, or rather a Roman of Britain ; 
to suppose him a nephew of Martin of Tours, 
requires great faith, even to remove moun- 
tains. 

He builds his first church at Sesenan, and 
leaves his son there as bishop with the two 
foreign boys. And then a story is told, in 
which Benignus is represented as the son of an 
Irishman of Ailbina, which evidently shews 
how much fraud and falsehood pervade all 
these compilations; for afterwards this very 
Tirechan tells us that Mathona, the sister of 
Benignus, was a foreigner. 

There cannot, I think, be a doubt, that 
Palladius, or the third Patrick, (if he was 
succeeded by another Patrick, which may 
be a mere invention, to reconcile the con- 
flicting testimony of Prosper, who mentions 
no missionary but Palladius, and says nothing 
of his successor Patrick) made some impres- 
sion on the Irish church, so far as to gain over 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 291 

some converts, or at least, induced the adoption 
of some Roman observances, for # Tirechan 
tells us, (p. 353) that " Hiffertus, of the men 
of Fiec, was the first of the Irish who burned 
wcense, and carried wax candles ; he first took 
them home from the hands of Patrick, and 
caused the smoke to ascend, into the eyes of 
the gentile men, and king Loigaire, and his 
magicians." 

It is very clear from this passage, that king 
Loigaire and his people were not heathens, or 
he would not have been annoyed by the holy 
smoke, but it was necessary to stigmatize them 
as gentiles and heathens, because to those 
Christians, who knew no Christianity but what 
they found in the scripture, wax candles and 
incense were an abomination* 

Palladius was unremitting in his attempts to 
bring over Loigaire, knowing well that the 
example of the prince would have an import- 
ant influence on the people, but it appears, the 
king was inexorable, and would not adopt 
the Roman liturgy, but determined to adhere 
to the pure faith of his fathers ; he, of course, 
is stigmatized as a heathen and publican. 

Although Loigaire was firnt in his determi- 

pp 



292 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

nation, and is declared a heathen, yet it ap- 
pears Palladius applied to the king for per- 
mission to visit the holy mountain Croagh Egli, 
(page 359) and he paid a donation of silver 
and gold, and also, for an escort of twelve 
men for protection, while on his journey. By 
this, it would appear, that Loigaire had no 
very violent desire to exterminate these mis- 
sionaries, or even to meddle with their proper- 
ty, beyond the tribute the laws justified him 
in demanding. If they possessed gold and 
silver, and other property, in such abundance, 
it supposes Loigaire and his people, not to 
have been the barbarians they wish us to be- 
lieve them, if they preserved all those tempt- 
ing effects in perfect security. 

This visit to Croagh Egli, is a remarkable 
instance, that on all occasions, the Roman 
clergy have acted on the policy of using the 
prejudices and superstitions of nations, by 
adopting their institutions. This mountain of 
Croagh Egli, now called Croagh Patrick, is 
mentioned by Ptolemy, as a holy mountain in 
his day. The antient Phenician Irish held it in 
great veneration. 

There is frequent mention of the foreign- 
ers, who were with Palladius ; (p. 360) "some 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 293 

of his foreigners were slain by Feredach, the 
son of Neill, whom Patrick cursed," &o. 
This Feredach was the brother of the king, 
and it appears either disregarded the curses, 
or they were not loud but deep. Palladius 
placed an altar of stone, (p.364) this custom 
also was new to the Irish Christians. 

Palladius brought with him tradesmen as 
well as clergymen, (p. 365) Assicus, whom be 
afterwards made a bishop, was a worker in 
brass, and made "altars for Patrick" and 
also cases for books, and patina, or salvers, for 
the sacrament. 

In many places, Tirechan speaks of the 
monks of Patrick, and the monks of Columb- 
kill, (page 375,) and the priests of Patrick, 
which shews the distinction made between 
those monks and priests which followed the 
Roman ritual of Palladius, and the antient 
clergy. Columbkill, we know from Bede, was 
of the antient church, as was Dagamus, 
Aidan, and Colman, and the greater part of 
the Irish people, although the Romish writers 
think right, to claim them as their own. 

The alledged conversation between Patrick 
and the daughters of Loigaire, is clearly 



294 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

a fabrication, and shews also what object Pal- 
ladius had in view, in this missionary invasion 
of Ireland, (p. 370) 



« 



Do you believe the unity of the church ?" 



Would such a question be put to a heathen, 
who must be totally ignorant of its meaning ? 

" And they accepted the mass (or liturgy) of 
Patrick" (p. 372.) This passage distinctly 
infers, that the people or priests of Achad 
Foboir, had been Christians, but now consented 
to adopt the mass, in lieu of their ancient for- 
Inula ; it cannot be interpreted that they became 
Christians, because, had that been the case, no 
such addition would have been necessary. 

It appears from the whole of the testimony 
of Tirechan, and the others, that this Palladius, 
or Patrick, travelled through Ireland in his 
chariot, with great consequence, circumstance, 
and importance, conquering and to conquer. 
And on his arrival at Croagh Egli, his cha- 
rioteer died, and was buried naked, and that 
he adopted the custom of the heathen Scots, 
by collecting stones, to make a cairn to his 
memory, and said, " Let this be so far ever, and 
let it be visited even to the remotest ages" Thus 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 295 

setting on foot a pilgrimage to the tomb of a 
man who had no other merit, at least none is 
mentioned, than being his charioteer. We 
are then told of his fasting forty days and 
nights, after the example of Moses, Helias, and 
Christ ! ! ! 

" Here a tooth of Patrick fell out, and he 
gave it to Bronus for a relic" (p. 380.) A 
tooth is still preserved, at Cong, in a splendid 
case. This was a pretty specimen of the mo- 
dest and unpresuming minister of the gospel. 
He canonizes himself and gives his own tooth 
as a relique. 

We are again told of his cursing a magi- 
cian, who, of course, was destroyed, and also 
a river, in which there never afterwards were 
any fish. 

" In that place a certain bishop came to him" 
This is also evidence of bishops in Ireland, 
before this second Patrick. He passed seven 
years in Connaught. 

It appears also, that Palladius brought 
with him all the armour of the Roman see, for 
we are told (p. 383.) that he gave Olcanus 



296 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

certain religues of Peter and Paid and the other 
apostles. 

" He ordained the boy Auxilius, the exorcist 
of Patrick." This Auxilius was one of those 
whom Palladius brought with him from Rome. 

There appears the greatest confusion of dates 
as to Patrick's coming, in (p. 887.) is the fol- 
lowing passage : — 

" In the thirteenth year of Theodosius, the 
Emperor, Patrick, the Bishop, was sent by 
Bishop Celestine, Pope of Rome, &c." 






This would give the date of A. D. 421, for 
Theodosius became emperor in 408, and con- 
sequently the thirteenth of his reign would be 
421. Bede says he succeeded Honorius in 
423, and that in his eighth year Palladius was 
sent, which gives 431 ; so says Prosper. 

" Palladius the bishop, was first sent, who 
is otherwise called Patrick, who suffered mar- 
tyrdom among the Scots, as the antient saints 
relate. Then the second Patrick was sent by 
an angel of God named Victor, and by Pope 
Celestine." 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 207 

Although I have remarked elsewhere on this 
passage it may not be amiss to notice here, 
the extraordinary fact, that Palladium was also 
called Patrick! !! and that after his death, 
another Patrick succeeded him, who was pro- 
bably second in command of this army of 
missionaries, and on the death of Palladius 
assumed the Patrician dignity as chief of the 
mission. This is, indeed, asserted by Dr. La- 
nigan to be the fact. It is true the angel 
Victor is brought in, as auxiliary to the pope, 
a necessary precaution, as the mission of the 
real Patrick, was from heaven, in a dream, in 
which appeared to him a man, named Victoria 
cius ,• the pretensions of this third Patrick 
would have suffered much, if this incident, so 
strikingly mentioned in the Confessio, had been 
omitted, nor would the likeness have been 
sufficiently strong to impose upon the most 
simple ; as it was, Aidus, and the Irish church 
and people, saw through it, and declared it 
contrary to their traditions and to the truth* 

(P. 394) " Colman the bishop, offered his 
church of Cluaincain, in Achud, to Patrick the 
bishop, as a votive offering for ever, and com- 
mended him to the holy men, the priests Medb 
and Sadb." 



298 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

This Colman was a bishop of the antient 
church, who deserted his faith, and went over 
to Palladius. Here we have further evidence 
of christians, priests, and even bishops, before 
the Roman Patrick, which clearly shews the 
mission of Palladius to have been to bring 
over Christians to Rome, not to convert heathens. 
This Colman not only adopted the Romish 
ritual, but commended Palladius to two other 
priests. 

In page 395, is another strong piece of evid- 
ence that Palladius found Christians differing 
with the Roman church : — 

" St. Patrick foreseeing through the Holy 
Spirit that his congregations in Kerry were 
much dispersed ; that is, bishop SacheUus, 
Brocidus, and Loarnus, and the priests Medb 
and Ernas, he joined them, as well in the unity 
of eternal peace, as in one ceremony of faith, 
under the sole authority of the successor in 
his apostolic chair at Altimacha." This priest 
Medb, was one of those to whom he had been 
commended by bishop Colman. 

(P. 397) " To Cummin belonged half the 
profits of the doors of the church of these 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 299 

inclosures, where .they brought their gifts, viz. 
three ingots, or ounces, of silver, a bar of silver, 
and a collar, three ounces of old gold of the 
dishes of their ancestors, &c. &c. 

It will not be denied, that this passage shews 
a considerable advancement in civilization. 

It appears that the spiritual superintendance 
over this property of Cummin, was in a bishop, 
called Colman of the Britons, possibly the same 
virtuous bishop mentioned by Bede, who so 
nobly sacrificed his worldly interests to his 
respect for, and attachment to truth. 

u Some people sinned by falling into con- 
tempt of Patrick, so that Cathbhadh and 
Iserninus were despised by them." (p. 399) 
Here is evidence of the doctrines of the Ro- 
mans, being despised; a few sentences after it 
appears, that this Iserninus and his monks 
submitted to Patrick, for his and for their 
faults. And Patrick gave them to bishop 
Fiech and to the sons of Cathbhad, who took 
possession of a portion of Athfetho. Here is 
another instance of Palladius, on the submis- 
sion of the Scots monks placing a bishop over 
them. 

Qq 



300 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

The account of the consecration of Fiach 
Finn is curious. Dubhthach is requested to 
choose a bishop, to be left at Lis Patrick. 
He answers, I will choose a man with but one 
wife, &c. And when he brought him to Pal- 
ladius, it is added, that he baptized him, and 
gave him the degree of a holy bishop, and he 
gave him a present of a bell, a mitre, a crozier, 
and a cloak (pallium*,) and left him seven of 
his people. It cannot be supposed this Fiech 
was baptized and made bishop by the same 
operation, which seems to be inferred here ; 
but there is no accounting for miracles. 

There appears through the whole of this 
detail, an anxious wish to impress the neces- 
sity and duty of obeying Patrick, i. e. the 
Roman Church, for Fiech is made to tell the 
angel, that he would not obey even him, the 
messenger of heaven, if Patrick should not 
direct him to do so. 

The last paragraph of Aidus is very curious 
in many respects ; first, as to this MS. — se- 



* This word is applied to the veil, as taken by a female, 
and means nothing more here than a cloak, not a pall, as 
now understood. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 301 

condly, as to himself — and lastly, as to the 
light it throws on the Irish church of the 7th 
century. 

1st. As to the MS. It says, " Aidus sent 
the collection of instruction (or this Book) to 
Segenius, then archbishop of Armagh, who 
desired him to (change his instruction) alter it" 
The summary, probably, did not go the length 
Segenius required ; but Aidus said, " he dedi- 
cated his instruction, and his people, and his 
church to Patrick for ever." Aidus left his 
instruction with Conchad.* 

The MS. was thus written and placed in 
the hands of the bishop of Armagh, and 
continued, as before stated, in those of his 
successors ; and thus its origin, custody, and 
history are clearly and satisfactorily account- 
ed for. 

With respect to Aidus and the Irish church, 
in the 7th century, this entry proves the im- 
portant fact, that he (Aidus) was the first of 
the Bishops of Slepten who sent in his adhe- 
sion, to use a Gallicism, to the Church of 



* See a fac simile of the original Irish of this passage, 
plate xii. No. 2. 



302 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

Rome, and was one of those Irish Bishops 
mentioned by Bede, who about this time adopt- 
ed the Roman observances. 



THE SUMMARY OF AIDUS. 

We now come to a document of paramount 
importance in this inquiry, compared to which 
all others, although strong and convincing, 
are indeed but slight evidence ; from them in- 
ferences, and strong ones, may be drawn, and 
fair and just conclusions may be elicited; from 
them we may justly conclude certain events 
to have taken place, by way of vis consequent 
tice ; but here we are supplied with positive 
evidence , demonstration, and that of the clear- 
est and most unquestionable character, which 
cannot be gainsayed. Here we have an Irish 
bishop of the seventh century, shortly before 
he adopted the formula of the church of Rome 
entering into an investigation of the pretensions 
of that church, and the history of St. Patrick, 
evidently for the purpose of justifying the step 
he afterwards took ; and what does he say ? 
That many people had endeavoured to relate 
to him what they had heard from their fathers 
about the story of St. Patrick, as transmitted 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 303 

to them, but " on account of the divers opinions 
and suspicions of most people, and the great 
difficulty of ascertaining the true narrative, they 
have never attained in this matter any certain 
track or path of history." 

He farther, after a little flourish of his 
learning, does not even pretend to have as- 
certained the true history — for he says, " If 
it can be said, that I have brought down the 
narrative;" and afterwards concludes most 
remarkably, by almost declaring his utter dis- 
belief in the corrupted and fictitious history ; 
stating, that he charitably made allowances, 
but still, with reluctance, selected a few acts 
which he thought might be true. His knowledge 
being small, his authors doubtful, his memory 
treacherous, and what was the worst of all, the 
common tradition of the country having failed 
to support the story. I shall only observe here 
on a few of those selected by Aidus, which 
are a strange mixture of contradictions. The 
fifth and sixth states, that St. Patrick con- 
templated going to visit the apostolic see, where 
he wished to learn wisdom, but that he found 
holy men in Gaul, and therefore went no 
further. The seventh mentions his mission 
from an angel to come and preach the gospel 
in Ireland, which is followed by two con- 



304 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

fused paragraphs, about the ordination and 
death of Palladius, and the ordination of 
Patrick by king Amatho, Palladius being dead. 

He speaks of the fable of Daire and other 
matters, which are not necessary to be here 
recapitulated, or further noticed. 



THE BOOK OF THE ANGEL. 

This is a strange admixture of the old tra- 
ditions of the Irish, and the inventions of the 
seventh century, evidently made up to serve a 
purpose, but it is replete with important evi- 
dence ; it declares throughout, that Patriok's 
commission was from above, that he was to be 
ranked with Peter and Paul, and the chief mar- 
tyrs ; that all his authority was derived imme- 
diately from heaven ,• that the city of Armagh, 
was an apostolic city; and that the primate 
and his successor should preside over all the 
churches of the Scots, even by the most exalted 
authority. That it was not lawful, by reason of 
this authority, for any prelate, abbot, or other 
person of the Scots, to appeal from his decision. 
That in all cases, where any person should 
commit any offence against the church, the 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 305* 

primate should decide, the other judges being 
passed by ; and if any case should arise too 
difficult for the judges, it ought properly to be 
referred to the primate. 

At the end of this book is the following 
passage : — 

" But if in such a case it cannot be decided 
by their own wise men, we decree that the 
before mentioned cause shall be transmitted 
to the apostolic chair, that is, to the chair of 
authority of the apostle Peter at the city of 
Rome." 

" Those are the persons who have decreed 
thus, that is, Auxilius, Patrick, Secundinus, 
and Benignus. After the death of Patrick, 
his disciples collected an account of his works 
and wrote them down." 

Having, I trust, clearly and satisfactorily 
shewn that Patrick, the genuine apostle of Ire- 
land, flourished long before the fifth century ; 
I shall now endeavour to account for the er- 
rors on the subject, which have so long pre- 
vailed, by a brief review of the period from 
the mission of Palladius in 430, to that of 
Aidus, or the writing of the Book of Armagh, 



*306 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

between the year 661 and 688. For although 
it appears clear from the life of Patrick, and 
the collections of Tirechan in the book of Ar- 
magh, that the transactions related in them, if 
true, refer not to Patrick, but to Palladius and 
his successors, yet I am rather inclined to con- 
sider them, or the greater part of them, if not 
absolute fictions, the exaggerations of the end 
of the sixth, or beginning of the seventh cen- 
turies. 

Palladius was sent to extirpate the Pelagian 
heresy, which had gained an ascendency in 
the Irish church. At that period the Ro- 
man church had not avowed the peculiar 
doctrines which were adopted in the succeed- 
ing ages ; nor was it till Boniface assumed the 
title of universal bishop, that the .pretensions 
of the church of Rome were fully develop- 
ed. The chief causes of separation between 
those congregations, which had been establish- 
ed by Palladius, and the antient Scottish 
church, were the veneration for reliques, the 
period of keeping Easter, the tonsure, and the 
variation of church goverment. That these 
congregations continued to exist in Ireland, se- 
parate from the national church is very clear 
from the two letters of Gregory, published by 
archbishop Usher in his " Veterum Epistola- 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 307* 

rum Hihernicarum Sylloge, Dublin 1632." 
The first, written A. D. 592, is addressed 
as follows : — " Gregory, to all the bishops 
throughout Ireland" In it, he says, he was 
much rejoiced at the receipt of their letter ; but 
that he should be more gratified if he had an 
opportunity of rejoicing in their return; and 
again, "let the integrity of your faith, at length, 
bring back your love for your mother church, 
which generated you : let not your minds be dis- 
united from the unity of concord §c" It ap- 
pears also that the Scottish church had com- 
plained of certain violations or alterations of 
the faith by the Roman church, which induces 
Gregory, to observe that in the synod, in which 
the subject of the Tria Capitula was treated of, 
it appeared manifest that nothing relative to the 
faith was torn away or even changed. And he 
strongly puts forth the doctrine of obedience, 
saying, " it does not become us, nor others, who 
are appointed under the mysteries of the catholic 
faith, either to say so (i. e. to question the de- 
cree of the synod,) or to alledge it in any man- 
ner" He then talks of having sent them the 
book written by his predecessor, Pope Pela- 
gius, which he enjoins them to read, and to 
submit by laying aside all self-willed defence, 
to return to our unity / and tells them that their 

conduct, if they persist in their opposition, 

*ji r 



♦308 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

after reading, will manifest an unbecoming 
obstinacy. Here we have the beginning of 
those exertions to bring the Scottish church 
to subjection, alluded to by Bede, and the 
strongest testimony that that church had not 
the same faith or observances as the Roman 
in 592, even that of the Pope himself '/ and it 
is not a little singular, that Gregory charges 
them with being over nice, by objecting to the 
three chapters, as deviations from the faith. 

The next letter of Gregory, written in the 
year 601, clearly shews the difference between 
the Scottish national churchy and that which 
the missionaries of Rome, had been able to 
establish in Ireland, by making the distinction. 
It is directed " to Quirinus and the rest of 
the Catholic Bishops in Ireland," and in it 
there is no complaint of deviation from the 
Roman observances, no invitations to return ; 
but they are treated as altogether faithful and 
obedient. That this Quirinus was an Italian is 
evident from his name, and he was of course 
a recent missionary. 

As the means of obtaining, first a uni- 
formity or conformity of liturgy, and after- 
wards a spiritual sovereignty over the Irish 
church ; it appears to have been part of the 



HOOK OF ARMAGH. 309* 

policy of the Roman missionaries, to fabricate 
the senseless and absurd fictions attributed to 
Fiech, Probus, Benignus, the second Patrick, 
and others ; which, in fact, $re nothing more 
than versions of St. Patrick's Confessio, en- 
larged and corrupted, by different hands, and 
called lives. The Confessio, published by Sir 
James Ware, and lately by Dr. O'Conor, is 
an example of this. It contains nearly twice 
the matter found in the Confessio of the Book 
of Armagh, which Aidus tells us was copied 
from the saint's own hand-writing ; and among 
other interpolations, the following very re- 
markable passage : — " Etuna benedicta Scotta, 
genetiva nobilis pulcherrima adulta erat quam 
ego baptizavi" This evidently was inserted to 
favour or establish the story of St. Bridget, 
whi/ch is altogether a fiction, as far as the first 
Patrick is concerned* It is also to be ob- 
served, that the Book of Armagh iff the only 
Irish authority; of the three others, mentioned 
by Sir James Ware and Dr. O 'Conor, one is 
from the Cotton library, by an anonymous 
writer, mixed up with the lives of Roman 
saints ; the two others are in the library of the 
cathedral of Salisbury, and all are of about 
the same age, namely, the tenth or eleventh 
cwturies. 



*310 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

Compare all these facts with what Bede 
tells us took place in the seventh and eighth 
centuries, of the active and unremitting exer- 
tions of the Roman church and clergy, to 
bring the Scots to uniformity with the universal 
church, because they were very unecclesiastical 
in many respects ; and also, what Aidus tells 
us, in his summary, that in his day, (the middle 
of the seventh century,) the common tradition 
of Ireland was against the written lives of Pa- 
trick, which he had collected; and the conclu- 
sion must be obvious. 

Segene, Segian, or Segenius, to whom Aidus 
dedicated his instruction, &c. succeeded 7%o- 
mian in the See of Armagh, in the year 661, 
and died in 688. Pope John, in A. D. 634, 
addressed to Thomian, as head of the Scottish 
clergy, the letter quoted from venerable Bede, 
(p. 64) in which this Segian is the last men- 
tioned of the priests, being then a young man. 
Thomian, or Segene, was the first of the 
bishops of Armagh who adopted the Romish 
manner of keeping Easter, and the other pecu- 
liarities in which the Scots had hitherto dif- 
fered. Having gained the primate, eventually 
the rest of the bishops and clergy were 
brought over. Pope John, in this letter 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 311* 

charges the Irish clergy with an old heresy for 
refusing his Easter, consequently, to this 
period, their practice was different from the 
Roman. Segenius, it appears entered into the 
Roman cause with zeal, and promoted it with 
energy, not being very particular as to the 
means. Aidus tells us, that he wished him to 
change his instruction, i. e. to make it more con- 
sistent with the new Jangled stories, promulgated 
a short time before, for the purpose of persuading 
the Scots, that Palladius, or the Roman mis- 
sionary of 430, was the same person as their 
venerated Patrick. This Aidus would not, or 
did not, accede to, but declared it to be incon- 
sistent with the received traditions of his coun- 
trymen, and that most people held a different 
opinion and suspected the fraud. Still it ap- 
pears, bishop Aidus was prevailed on to submit 
to the authority of the pope, under the name 
of Patrick. Bede says, pope John warned the 
Scots of the Pelagian heresy, which he under- 
stood was springing up amongst them. In the 
heads of the books in the version of the New 
Testament, in the Book of Armagh, written 
by Aidus, we find the name of Pelagius fixed, 
as the author of the expositions and explana- 
tions. These' corroborations are very striking 
and satisfactory, and clearly shew, that the 
name of Patrick was assumed, and made use 



*312 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

of at this period, to subvert the church and 
faith he had established. Prosper does not 
mention Patrick, because he never heard of 
him, nor should we have ever had his name 
handed down to us, but that it accorded with 
the policy of the Roman church to adopt him 
into their calendar, and to claim him as their 
own ; by affixing, near two centuries after his 
death, that name to their own missionaries. 
I shall not waste farther argument to prove a 
fact, which the whole tenor of the existing 
evidence demonstrates. 



COLGAN*S LIVES. 



Besides fragments, Colgan published seven 
lives of St. Patrick, of which the sixth and se- 
venth being of comparatively recent compila- 
tion, made up from the others, and spiced 
higher, to suit them to the taste of the age 
for which they were written, I shall therefore 
pass them by without further notice. 

Of the others, the first is the hymn or me- 
trical version, attributed to Fiech. 

The second is attributed to St. Patrick, ju- 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 313* 

trior, the disciple of the alledged Patrick, and 
is taken from a MS. in the monastery of St. 
Hubert, in Ardvenna. 

The third is attributed to Benignus, also a 
disciple of the alledged Patrick, and is copied 
from an antient MS., at Biburgh, in Bavaria, 
and was communicated to Colgan, by Ste- 
phen White, a Jesuit, a most zealous investi- 
gator of antiquity. Colgan says it agrees with 
the preceding life, in the first eleven chapters, 
but differs much in all the rest. 

The fourth life is attributed to St. Eleran, 
the wise, and is given from a vellum MS., of 
the monastery Alnensis, where it appears there 
were two MS. lives of St. Patricks, from one 
of which he gave this fourth life, the other 
agreeing generally with that of the monastery 
of St. Hubert, called the second life, by Col- 
gan. 

The fifth life had the following singular 
title: — 

" B. Patricii primi predicatoris et episcopi 
totius Britannice, vita et actus. Authore Pro- 
bo." 



*314 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

u The life and acts of St. Patrick, the first 
preacher and bishop of all Britain. By 
Probus." 

Who Probus was, appears a difficulty not 
to be solved. Some writers say he flourish- 
ed in the year 260 ! ! ! Usher thought he 
was an Irishman, and others fix him to the 
seventh century, viz. A. D. 646 ; but the opi- 
nion of Colgan himself is, that he lived in the 
beginning of the tenth century. 

This life agrees in substance, but not in lan- 
guage, with the preceding, with, however, 
the addition of some few absurdities. He talks 
of St. Patrick baptizing the people of Scotia, 
Britain, England, and Normandy ! ! ! which 
settles the point of his antiquity, and proves 
him to have been a clumsy fabricator. As 
before stated, these lives are all but versions 
of St. Patrick's Confessio, corrupted and en- 
larged. 

That Palladius, and his followers, succeeded 
in forming congregations, and founding many 
churches and monasteries in Ireland, and 
that the church established by them, continued 
separate and distinct, is, I think, very clear ; 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 315* 

but that Palladius, or any of his immediate suc- 
cessors, never bore the name of Patrick, while 
they lived, is equally so. This name was given 
them in the beginning of the seventh century, 
in accordance with the policy of the Roman 
church, to obliterate, in the Scots, the recollec- 
tion of their venerated apostle, and to transfer 
their affections to the Roman church, by giv- 
ing his name to their missionary. In this they, 
eventually, completely succeeded, but it re- 
quired centuries to accomplish it. Aidus tells 
us, that in his day, the people did not believe 
it. 

I shall not fatigue the reader by accumu- 
lating testimony, or bringing forward more 
evidence to establish the facts under conside- 
ration, as enough, in my humble judgment, 
has been adduced to satisfy any unprejudic- 
ed mind ; but there is • one more fact to be 
found in the Annals of the Four Masters, and 
the other chronicles of Ireland, which is so 
very remarkable, and so unaccountable, that 
I cannot pass it by without observation, and 
with it I shall conclude. — It is, that, at the 
request of Patrick, in the year 438, a commit- 
tee of three kings, three saints, and three his- 
torians, were appointed to purify the Irish an- 
nals, and to make them conformable to the no- 

*S9 



*316 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

tions of the Roman Patrick, who was one of 
the saints. In other words to corrupt the re- 
cords of the country ; and, as they had usurp- 
ed the name of Patrick, to prevent detection, 
by altering and interpolating those documents 
which would expose the fraud. The Annals 
of the Four Masters give it thus in Doctor 
O'Conor's translation : — 

" The year of Christ 438, the tenth year of 
Loigaire. The histories and laws of Ireland 
were purified, and copied from written collec- 
tions, and compiled from the old books of 
Ireland, into one place, by the desire of St. 
Patrick* These are the nine wise authors who 
there did it. Loigaire, that is the king of Ire- 
land, Gorccus, and Daire, three kings ; Pa- 
trick, Benignus and Cairnechus, three saints ; 
Ros, Dubthacus, and Fergus, three historians." 

This singular passage, no doubt, refers to 
the expurgation of the histories of Ireland, to 
make them accord with the declarations of 
those who wished to impose the missionary of 
Celestine on the Scottish nation as the real 
Patrick; without this purgation the object 
never could have been accomplished. Aidus 
tells us that, in his day, the tradition of the 
country continued to support the original true 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 317* 

history; it is therefore probable, this spoli- 
ation and vitiation of Irish history, was the 
work of the early part of the seventh century. 
It is altogether improbable, that Loigailre, who 
is represented as a heathen to his death, would 
have joined Palladius in such a wwk. It is 
too gross a fabrication for the belief of a ra- 
tional mind. 

I have had the assistance tff aay friehd, 
Mr. Edward O'Reily, in the translation of the 
Irish, who declares it to be certainly the oldest 
dialect of the language he has ever seen. I 
have giy^n a fac-simile of the passage, a tran- 
slation of which may be found in page 401, 
beginning " Aldus, $c" and the original in mo- 
dern Irish in the appendix. (See plate XII. 
No. 2.) 

In the 48th verse of the 27th chapter of the 
gospel of St* Matthew, this version has the 
same peculiarity ds Dimma's, remarked upon 
in the note of p. 46, containing 1 the extract 
from Dr. H* M* Mason's . Essay ; in which 
last, however, there is an error of language. 
The words in Dimma's MS. are "Alius autem 
aecepta* lancea pupungit latus ejus et exivit 



(.••.»« 4 . » . • * ; » t •» 



* Not captcti 



*318 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

aqua et sanguis* Jesus autem iterum damans 
voce magna emisit spiritum, et encce velum 
templi, &c." At this part is this side note " Hie 
auctores canunt uathp nostep," which is re- 
peated in the gospel . of St. Mark, where the 
same passage occurs. At the end of the gos- 
pel of St. John is the following entry :— 

" Finita sunt Evangelia numero quatuor 
Matheus, Marcus, Lucas, Johannes" 

Matheus versus habet MMDCC. 

Marcus MDCC. 

Lucas MMDCCCC. 

Johannis MMCCC. 

Et facit totum . .MMMMMMMMMCCCC." 

The total is erroneously calculated, it should 
be 9600 verses. 

The prologues of Pelagius on the epistles 
of St. Paul, are very interesting documents, 
they are the production of an individual of 
whom we know but little, except through 
the writings of his adversaries, who, although 
they condemn his opinions, admit him to have 
been blameless in his life and conversation. — 
This singular character was the only native 
of Britain, who made any considerable figure 
in the early ages of the church, and with 



BOOK OF ARMAGH* 819* 

his friend and companion Celestius, an Irish 
Scot, were the earliest natives of these islands 
who ventured opinions in opposition to those 
of the eastern fathers. However erroneous 
may have been those opinions, they were men 
of great learning, acute judgment, and piety, 
and as such, their country may be gratified 
at having produced them. 

It appears probable that they retired to Ire- 
land, after their condemnation, at Rome, in 
415, and brought with them the version of 
St. Jerome, of which this is very similar in 
its language, though it differs in many im- 
portant particulars. It is certain the antient 
Irish church considered him orthodox, or they 
would not have affixed his expositions to the 
New Testament. The arrangement of the 
books is different, and the epistle of St. Paul 
' to the Laodiceans is inserted, but Pelagius re- 
marks in the argument, that Jerome denies it 
to be written by Paul. 

The disputed seventh verse of the fifth 
chapter of the first epistle of St. John, re- 
specting the heavenly witnesses, " For there 
are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, 
the word, and the Holy Ghost, and these three 
are one" is omitted in^this version. 



& 



*320 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

The variation of the Lord's Prayer is also 
remarkable ne patiaris, <&c. " do not suffer us 
to be led into temptation" which certainly ap- 
pears to be more consistent thau the common, 
accepted rendering. - 

There are many other important variations 
from the vulgate, the discussion <rf which, even 
if I thought myself competent to the task, 
which I do not, would be ' foreign to my ob- 
jept. I shall, therefore conclude, with, ex- 
pressing a hope, that some learned and acute 
scholar will undertake the task of collating 
this valuable and singularly interesting version, 
which appears to promise, at least, to repay 
well the labour expanded upon it. 

I have not considered it necessary to enlarge 
upon, or to use argument to prove the antiqui- 
ty of the book of Armagh, it contains evi- 
dence, within ^tself, of its ago, which not only 
renders discussion on the subject unnecessary, 
but supplies us with sure data, whereby we 
may form a more accurate judgment of the 
age of other MSS. In discussing the subject 
of the introduction of writing into Ireland, 
which I contemplate hereafter, I trust I shall 
be able to shewr th$t little dependance is to be 
placed in the opinions and dicta of Astle, and 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 321* 

other English writers, who haver generally 
treated the pretensions of Ireland, to a statfeat 
all above barbarism, with a most unaccounta* 
ble carelessness bordering on contempt. They 
have laid it down as a point not to be question- 
ed, that Ireland toad ev&r a barbarous nation* 
and* therefore, that investigation and inquiry 
into the subject are ri6t only Useless and unne- 
cessary, but that any one venturing the task 
would deserve the- united ridicule and con- 
tempt of the learned. 

The Irish, while they fondly cherished the 
object, for the establishment of which this 
long-continued train of falsehood and deceit 
was contrived and carried on* have always ad- 
hered to the tradition of the learning, civiliz- 
ation, and greatness of their ancestors, but in 
total ignorance that the cause of their Humilia- 
tion was the papalpower ahd religion ', which, 
from its first introduction by PaHadius, gradu- 
ally sapped, and eventually destroyed, 1 the 
religion of the Irish nation^ by turning their 
attention from the substance to a shaddw, 
checking inquiry, iand shackling the humfcn 
intellect. 

The following translations I have rendered 
as literal as I possibly could. It should, how- 



f 

y 



*322 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES* 

ever, be recollected, that the Latin is very ob- 
scure, and the meaning of many passages, of 
necessity, must be guessed from their context 
and other circumstances. I think, however, 
there are very few passages in which the 
meaning has been mistaken ; the substance is 
given, not indeed with elegance of language, 
but with fidelity ; it was considered in the 
light of evidence, and, if the true meaning of 
a passage was obtained, I was not solicitous 
about its diction. In page 331, the fifth line 
from the top, the words Christi annorum baf- 
fled me. After it was printed, I saw, and 
wondered how it escaped, that it should have 
been one word, Christianorum, " of the Chris- 
tians" I do not, however, think it an error of 
sufficient importance to cancel the page for it. 

I beg leave, in this place, to express my 
graceful acknowledgments to his Grace the 
Archbishop of Dublin, through whose kind- 
ness and condescension I first became ac- 
quainted with the existence of the Book of Ar- 
magh, and obtained permission to investigate 
its contents, and lay them before the public. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH, 



LIFE OF 8. PATRICK. 



he being placed in slavery in Ireland,* 
said} that he was visited by frequent visions, 
saying to him that the time was at hand, when 
he should come and preach the Gospel to 
these savage and barbarous nations ; that 
God had sent him to fish there for men, and 
it was told him, in a vision, that their sons and 
daughters at the wood of Foclisia called for 
him, &c. 

In duef time, therefore, accompanied by 
divine assistance, he set out upon his journey, 
to accomplish that, for which he was before 
prepared — to * preach the Gospel ; and Ger- 
manus, moved by the Holy Spirit, sent an 
elder with him, that is, Segitius, that he might 
have a companion and witness, because he was 
not as yet ordained by the holy lord Germa- 
nus in the pontifical degree. 

* The first membrane of the MS. having been lost, renders 
this sentence obscure and imperfect. 

b r 



306 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

For it was true that Palladium, archdeacon 
of Pope Celestine, bishop of the city of Rome, 
who then held the apostolic chair, the forty- 
fifth from Saint Peter, the apostle, was or- 
dained and sent to this island ; placed under the 
winter's cold, to convert them, but he forbid 
him to receive oblations,* because no one can 
receive any land, unless it were given him from 
heaven. For neither did those rude and savage 
people readily receive his doctrine, nor did 
he wish to pass his time in a land, not in his 
own,f but returning hence, to him who sent 
him, having begun his passage, the first tide, 
little of his journey being accomplished > he 
died in the British dominions.! 

The death of S. Palladius, among the Bri- 
tons, was soon heard of, for his disciples that 
is, Augustinus and Benediclus, and the rest, 
returning, related in Ebmoria the circumstance 
of his death, § 



* To receive grants of land. 

t Celestine sends Palladius, and yet forbids Aim to do the 
work for which he was sent ! ! 

$ Tirechan, says Palladius, suffered martyrdom among the 
Scots, 

§ The disciples of Palladius returned to Ireland, and 
brought the news of his death. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 307 

Patrick, and those who were with him, hav- 
ing declined the journey, went to a certain 
man, an illustrious priest and king, Amathus, 
living in a neighbouring place. Saint Patrick 
knowing what events would occur, received 
there the episcopal degree from Matho, the holy 
king and bishop,* likewise Auxilius, and 
Iserninus, and others, received inferior de- 
grees on the same day on which Patrick was 
ordained. 

Then, having received the blessings, and 
every thing being accomplished according to 
custom, Patrick, having sung, as was becoming 
and proper, a verse of the following psalm : 
" Thou art a priest for ever, after the order of 
Melehisedec" the venerable traveller embarked 
in a vessel prepared for him, in the name of 
the holy trinity, and reached Britain. 

• 

And, avoiding all circuitous paths, he went 
forward in the straight way, for no sincere 
one seeks the Lord in vain, with great expe- 
dition, and a prosperous wind, he reached our 
shores. 

* This ordination of Patrick, by king Amathus, refers to 
the first Patrick. PaUadius the Second was ordained by 
Celestine. Auxilius and Isernrnus, were part of the staff 
PaUadius. 



308 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

But in the days, in which those things were 
done, there was in the before-mentioned 
countries, a certain great fierce and gentile 
king, emperor of the barbarians, reigning in 
Temoria, who was the chief of the Sc&h, 
named Loigaire, the son of Neitt, the origin 
of almost all the royal race of this island ; he 
had wise men and magicians, and soothsayers, 
and enchanters, and inventors of every evil 
art; wha could know and foretel every thing 
before it should happen, after the manner of 
gentiles and idolaters; amongst whom, two 
were eminent above the rest, — their names 
were Lothroch, which is Lochric, and huca- 
mael, which is Ronal; and those two, by 
their magic art, often prophesied that there 
would be a certain foreign custom introduced, 
as the custom of the kingdom, with a certain 
unknown obnoxious doctrine, from far beyond 
sea, dictated by a few, and received by many : 

~ To be honored by all, 

About to overthrow kingdoms, 
About to seduce opposing crowds, 
About to destroy all their gods, 
And about to rule above all others, by 
the powers of its art, for all ages. 

They declared that this law should be power- 
ful and persuasive, and should surpass in 
strength and manner of language, the dictates 
which had frequently been issued previously 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 309 

to the coming of Saint Patrick, for two or 
three years. 

But these are short sentences, which, from the 
idiom of the language, are not easy todecipher. * 

He shall prevail by his wooden staff, with 
a curved perforated head, and enchant from his 
house, a wicked thing! all his family from his 
table, from the farther part of his house shall 
answer him—" let it to done, — ietit b&done." 

Which can be very clearly expressed in 
our words : when all these things are come to 
pass, our kingdom, which is gentile, shall not 
stand, -that, which is so powerful, shall vanish, 
for the warship of idols, *hall he ©very mbenfe 
overturned at the coming of Patrick — -for the 
general faith of Christ &all fill all ithings. 

Of these enough has been said, let us return 
to our subject. 

The voyage of the Saint, therefore, being 
terminated, and the honored ship of the Saint 
with its foreign wonderful and living treasures 
was borne, as if to a favorable port, in the 

* The prophecy having been written in Irish. 



310 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES* 

country of the Coolenni, to a haven, which is 
renowned amongst us, and is called hoetium 
Dei. It appeared to him, that nothing was 
better than that, in the first place, he should 
redeem himself, and from thence proceeding 
to the left countries, he turned the head of his 
ship, that he might go to the gentile Milcoin, 
with whom he was formerly in slavery; and, 
carrying twice the price, of his ransom as wett 
heavenly as earthly, that he might liberate 
himself from the slavery of him, whom he 
had before served in captivity, at the farther 
part of the island; which is called after his 
name even to this day. 

He then proceeded to Brega Conalneas, 
which is at the extremity of Ulster, even to 
the farthest strait which is Brene. And they 
went down in the land to the port of Slain ; he 
and those who were with him in the ship, and 
they left. the boat, and came after a little into 
the country to rest there. 

And they found living there the swine herds 
of a certain naturally good man, although a 
gentile, whose name was Dicht^, where now 
is what is called the barn* of Patrick. But 

• 

* Abbey of Saul. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 311 

the swine-herd, thinking that they were thieves 
and robbers, ran off and told it to his lord 
Dicku. 

He brought him against them, and being 
ignorant, he proposed in his heart to slay 
them, but seeing the face of Saint Patrick, 
the lord changed his thoughts to good, and 
Patrick preached the faith to him, and he 
believed, and the Saint remained there with 
him a few days. But he wished to go 
quickly to visit the before-mentioned man 
Milcoin, and carry to him his ransom, as. well 
as to convert him to the faith of Christ. 
Having left his ship there at Dicoin, he began 
to direct his way to the regions of the Picts,* 
until he reached the mountain Mis, from 
which mountain, a long time before, when he 
was there in slavery, with hasty progress he 
saw the angel Victoricius ascend to heaven in 
his sight, leaving his footstep pressed on the 
rock of the mountain. 

But Milcoin, hearing that his slave was come 
to visit him, to introduce, as if by force, a 
custom which he did not wish, in the end of 
his life ; that he should not be subject to his 

* • . . * Cruidnenormp. 



312 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

slave, and that he should not rule over him, 
at the instigation of the devil, he burned him- 
self and his house, which he formerly in- 
habited, with fire — the king was burned, to- 
gether with all his substance collected around 
him. 

Saint Patrick standing in the above-men- 
tioned place, at the side of the before-named 
mountain Mis, where formerly the cross ap- 
peared for a sign, and met his sight, in that 
very place, he beheld the funeral pile of the 
king in flames. 

Astonished, therefore, at this spectacle, he 
remained two or three hours without uttering 
a word, sighing, groaning, and weeping, and 
uttering these words: €€ I know not, God 
knows, this king, who destroyed himself with 
fire, Would not believe in the end of his life, 
and would not obey the eternal God ; I know 
not, but God knows, no one of his sons shall 
reign as king upon the throne of his kingdom 
from generation to generation, and his seed 
shall be slaves for ever." 

And uttering these words, and fortifying 
himself with the sign of the cross, he quickly 
bent his way to the country of the Ultoniam, 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 313 

by the same way, and again came to the plain 
of Mis to Dichuy and remained there many 
days going through the whole plain round 
about, and esteemed and loved them, for the 
faith began to increase there. 

But Easter approached in which was the 
first passover celebrated to God, in this Egypt 
of our island — it was celebrated as formerly 
in Genesera. They found that a great coun- 
cil was to be held 'by the gentiles, to whom 
God had sent him at the same time, and that 
they were to celebrate the mysteries of their 
religion ; whereupon it appeared to Saint 
Patrick who was divinely inspired, that this 
great solemnity of the Lord, which was, the 
head of all solemnities, should be celebrated 
in the very great plain, where was the chief 
seat of empire of those nations, and of all 
gentile customs, and of idolatry; that the 
cause of Christ could not be advanced more 
than that this unconquerable wedge, should 
be driven into the head of all idolatry, that it 
might not any farther have the power to 
rise against the faith of Christ, and so it was 
accomplished by the faith of St. Patrick and 
by his hands. 

Having, therefore, pushed down the ship to 

s s 



314 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

the sea ; and that good man, Dichu, having 
dismissed them in perfect " faith, and peace, 
leaving the plain of Iniss to the right hand, 
submitting aH things to the fulness of their 
office, which were not unsuitable, they were 
borne to the left, happily and prosperously to 
the port of Colpdi. And, leaving their vessel 
there, they proceeded on foot to the before- 
~ft~d.Lt p..™, *„«, at Ungft, tow.** 
evening, they reached Ferti, of the men of 
Feec, which, as stories tell, there belonged to 
Fodoremus; that is the servant of Feecd 
Ferchertni, who was one of the nine magicians, 
the prophets of Bregg, and there having 
pitched his tent, Saint Patrick performed the 
necessary vows of Easter, and sacrifice of 
praise to the most high God, with all devotion, 
in conjunction with his followers, according to 
the words of the prophet. 

It happened in that year, that the gentiles 
were about celebrating an idolatrous solem- 
nity, accompanied with many incantations, 
and some magical inventions, and other 
idolatrous superstitions ; their kings being col- 
lected, also their satraps, with their chief 
leaders, and the principal among the people, 
and magi, and enchanters, and soothsayers, 
and the inventors of all arts, and gifts, doctors, 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. P1TRICK. 315 

as they are called, to Loigaire, in Temoria, 
as their Babylon, as formerly to king Nebocho- 
donossor, on the same night in which Saint 
Patrick was celebrating Easter, they were 
employed in their heathen festival. 

There was also a certain custom amongst 
them — and they were enjoined by an edict, 
that, whoever, throughout the whole country, 
far or near, should on that night light a fire, 
before it was done in the king's house, that is 
in the Palace of Temoria, that soul should 
be cut off from his people. 

Saint Patrick, therefore, celebrating the 
holy Easter, lighted a divine and blessed fire 
very bright, which shining, in the night, was 
seen by almost all the inhabitants of the plain. 

Therefore, it happened, that it was seen 
from Temoria, and, when they beheld it, they 
were all astonished, and the seniors and elders 
being called to the king, declared that they were 
ignorant of who had done this; but the magi 
said, " O king, live for ever ! the fire which we 
see, and which is lighted up this night, before 
it was lighted in your palace of Temoria, 
unless it should be put out on the same 
night on which it was lighted, it will never 



316 . IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

be extinguished for all eternity ; and moreover, 
all our accustomed fires will be put out, and 
he, who lighted it, coming to this kingdom, on- 
the night in which the fire takes place, shall 
overcome you and us all, and shall seduce 
all the men of your kingdom, and all other 
kingdoms shall fall to him, and he shall fill 
all places, and shall rule for all generations.' * 

King Lotgaire, having heard those predic- 
tions, was greatly disturbed, (as was Herod 
formerly) and all the state of Temoria with 
him — and answering, he said, " it shall not 
be so ; but we will now go, that we may see 
the issue of the affair, and we will take into 
custody and slay those persons committing 
such enormities in our kingdom. 9 ' 

Taking with him thrice nine chariots, ac- 
cording to the tradition of the gods, and the 
two magicians, prepared for conflict, that is to 
say, Lucetmail and Locru, in the end of the 
night, Loigaire set out from Temoria to Ferti, 
of the men of Feec. The faces of the men, 
and of the horses, were turned, according to 
what was pointed out to them, to the left. 

And, as they went along, the magi said to 
the king, " Oh ! king, you shall not go to the 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 317 

place in which the fire is, lest, perhaps, you 
may hereafter adore him who lighted the fire, 
but you shall remain abroad ; but he shall be 
called to you, that he may adore you, and 
you shall rule over him, and we will converse 
with him by turns even in. your sight, and 
O king, you shall prove us." And the 
king answering, said, " you have counselled 
well, I will do as you have suggested." . 

And they came to the appointed place, and 
descended from their chariots and horses, they 
did not enter into the circuit of the inflamed 
place, but stopped near. 

And Saint Patrick was called to the king, 
near the place where the fire was ; and the 
magicians said to their own party : — " Let us 
not rise up at his approach, for whoever shall 
rise up at his coming shall believe in him, and 
afterwards shall adore him; finally, Saint 
Patrick rising, and perceiving many chariots 
and their horses, he sung this verse, of the 
psalm, not inapplicably, with his lips and in 
his heart — "Same ride in chariots, and some 
on horses, but we will proceed in the name of 
our God" 

And he went towards them and they did 



318 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

not rise at his approach, but one alone, insti- 
gated by God, who would not obey the orders 
of the magicians, that is Erce, the son of Dego, 
(whose reliques are now adored in the city, 
which is called SUme) he rose up, and Patrick 
blessed him, and he believed in the eternal 
God. 

As they commenced discoursing alternately, 
the magician, Locru, was bold in the presence 
of the Saint, daring to detract from the Catholic 
faith, with boisterous words, but Saint Patrick 
glancing at him uttering such expressions, as 
Peter did formerly at Simon, with power and 
great boldness exclaiming to the Lord, he said, 
" O Lord ! who art almighty, and by whose 
power all things consist, and ye who sent me 
hither, let this impious wretch who blasphemes 
thy name, be lifted forth, and let him quickly 
die." And having said this, the magician was 
lifted up to the sky, and again cast down and 
his brains dashed out against a stone, and he 
died in their sight, and the gentiles feared. 

And the king, and his followers, being en- 
raged against Patrick, hereupon desired to 
kill him, and said, " lay hands on this wretch 
who is destroying us." Then, Saint Patrick 
seeing the impious gentiles about rushing 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 319 

upon him, he rose up and with a clear voice 
said, " Let God arise, and let his enemies be 
scattered, and let them who hate him flee 
before him ;" and instantly darkness ensued, 
and a dreadful commotion, and the impious 
wretches attacked each other, the one rushing 
upon the other, and there arose a great earth- 
quake, and they collected their chariots, and 
drove them with force, and they rushed pre- 
cipitately themselves in their chariots and their 
horses through the plain, until at length a 
few of them escaped, half-dead, to the moun- 
tain Monduwn, and there were prostrated, of 
the men of this country, before the king, by 
the curse of Patrick, forty-nine men. The king 
himself, however, remained, he and his wife 
and two others of the Scots, and greatly 
feared. 

And the queen coming to Patrick, said to 
him, " O just and powerful man, destroy not 
the king — for the king will come and bend 
his knee, and will adore thy Lord." And the 
king came, impelled by fear, and bent his 
knee before the Saint, and set himself to 
worship him whom he was unwilling to 
honor, and when they separated a little dis- 
tance, the king stepping forward, called Saint 
Patrick, with feigned words, wishing to slay 



320 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

him. But Saint Patrick knowing the thoughts 
of the wicked king, having blessed his fol- 
lowers, in the name of Jesus Christ, came 
with eight men and a boy to the king. The 
king seeing them approach, his eyes failed 
him, but the gentiles saw those eight persons 
going like stags with a fawn, as if to the 
desert, and king Loigaire sad, fearful, and 
disgraced, escaping with a few followers arriv- 
ed late at Temoria. 

But on the following day, that is on the 
day of Easter, as the kings and princes and 
magicians were with Loigaire, (for that was 
a very great feast day amongst them) while 
they were eating and drinking wine, in the 
palace of Temoria — some were conversing, 
and others reflecting on those things which 
were done, Saint Patrick, with only two (or 
five) men, proceeded to contend and argue 
concerning the holy faith in Temoria, before 
all the people, with closed doors, according to 
that which is written of Christ. / He then 
coming into the supper-room of Temoria, no 
one of them all rose up at his coming except 
one alone, that is Dubtkach Macculugil, a very 
great poet, with whom there was at that time 
a certain youthful poet, named Feec, who af- 
terwards became a celebrated bishop, whose 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — LIPE OF S. PATRICK. 381 

reliques are adored in Sleibti. This Dubthach 
alone, ad I have said, of all the people, rose 
up in honor of Saint Patriek, and the Saint 
blessed him — and he first believed on that day, 
and it was counted to him for righteousness. 

Saint Patrick, on being seen, was invited 
by the gentiles to eat, that they might prove 
him in future transactions, but he, knowing 
what was about to happen, did not refuse to 
partake. 

Whilst they were all at supper, Lucetmail, 
the magician, who was in the night conflict, 
as well as in that which took place on that 
day, was anxious, on account of the death of 
his associate, to contend against Saint Patrick, 
and commenced in this manner, whilst some 
were looking, he poured from his vessel 
into the cup of Patrick, to see what he 
would do. 

And Saint Patrick, seeing the object of 

this probation, in presence of all, blessed the 

cup, and the liquor became like ice, and the 

vessel being turned, that alone fell out which 

the magician had put into it, and he again blessed 

the cup, and the liquor was restored to its natu* 

ral state, and they all wondered, 

t t 



322 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

And after a little while, the magieian said, 
"Let us perform signs in this very great 
plain." Patrick, answering, said, "What 
signs?" And the magician said, "Let us bring 
down snow upon the earth." And Patrick 
replied, " I am loath to act contrary to the 
will of God," but the magician said, " I will 
bring it down," Then, in presence of them 
all, he commenced his magical incantations, 
and brought down snow upon the whole plain 
of Ferenn ; and they all saw it, and were as- 
tonished. And the Saint said, " Behold ! dis- 
continue that which we now see." And he 
said, " Before this hour to-morrow I cannot 
discontinue it ;" and the Saint said, " You 
have power to do evil, but not good — it is not 
so with me >" Then, blessing the whole circuit 
of the plain, the snow immediately vanished 
without rain, clouds, or wind. The crowd 
shouted and wondered in their hearts — and 
after a little, having invoked the demons, 
the magician brought down very thick dark- 
ness upon the earth. And they all mur- 
mured. The Saint said, " Dispel the 
darkness." But he likewise failed in this; 
but the Saint praying, blessed it, and sud- 
denly the darkness vanished and the sun 
shone, and they all shouted, and gave 
thanks. 



BOOR OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 323 

All these things were done in sight of the 
king, between the magician and Patrick, and 
the king said, "Cast your books into the 
water, and him whose books shall pass this 
trial, we will adore." Patrick answered, 
" 1 will do so." But the magician said, " I 
will not submit to the trial by water with that 
man, for his god certainly possesses power 
over the water." — For he heard of Patrick's 
baptizing with water, and the king answering 
said: " Permit the trial to take place by fire." 
And Patrick said, €€ I am ready." And the 
magician unwilling, said, " This man alter- 
nately, in each successive year, adores water 
and fire." And the Saint said, ".Not so, but 
you yourself, with one of my boys, shall go 
into a separate and closed house, and your 
vestment shall be on him, and mine on you ; 
' and thus, at the same time, the house shall 
be set on fire." And this counsel was ap- 
proved, and there was a house built for them, 
half of which was made of green materials, 
and the other half was formed of dry; and 
the magician entered into that part of the 
house which was green, and one of the boys 
of Saint Patrick, Bineus by name, with the 
magic vest, was shut up in the other part of 
the house, which was then set on fire at 
the outside before the whole crowd, and it 



324 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

came to pass, while Patrick prayed, that the 
flame encompassed the magician with hid green 
half of the house, while the part of Saint 
Patrick remained untouched, the fire did not 
assail it. But the fortunate Bineus, on the 
contrary, was untouched in his dry half of the 
house, according to what was said of the 
three children, " the fire did not touch him, 
neither was he made sad," and the apartment 
of the magician was burned without injury 
to his part of the house, not without the per- 
mission of God. The king was greatly in- 
dignant against Patrick, on account of the 
death of his magician, and he almost had 
rushed upon him, desiring to slay him, but God 
prevented him> for at the intercession of 
Patrick, and at his entreaty the wrath of God 
descended on his head, and the king greatly 
feared, and his heart was alarmed, and all the 
state with him. 

The elders, therefore, and all his senate, 
being assembled — king Loigaire, said to them, 
"It is better that I should believe than die;"— 
and the council being entered into, according 
to their advice* he believed on that day, and 
Was converted to the everlasting God of 
Israel. Thereupon many others also believ- 
ed, and Saint Patrick said to the king, " Be- 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 325 

cause you have resisted my doctrine, and have 
been a scandal to me, although the days of 
your reign may be prolonged, nevertheless, 
there shall be no king of your seed for ever." 

But Saint Patrick, according to the com- 
mand of the Lord Jesus, baptized those nations 
in the name of the Father and of the Son and 
of the Holy Ghost, and having set out from 
Temoria, he preached, the Lord assisting him, 
and confirming his sayings, with many mira- 
cles. 

There was a certain man in the country 
of the Ulothori, in the time of Patrick, 
Macuil Macugreccce, a man who was very 
impious, tfruel, and tyrannous, like a Cy- 
clops — depraved in thought, and also in 
words — 

Malignant in Action, 

Bitter in spirit, 

Angry in disposition, 

Abandoned in body, 

Cruel in mind, 

A gentile in his life, 

Void of conscience, 
sinking into such a depth of impiety, that 
on a certain day, in a rough mountainous 
height, sitting in the place of Hindruim Mac- 



326 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

cuechachj he daily exercised his tyranny, com- 
mitting the most impious cruelties, and slay- 
ing his guests on their journey, with abandoned 



Seeing Saint Patrick, shining with the clear 
light of faith, and glittering with the glorious 
diadem of his heavenly father, unshaken in 
his doctrine, and confidently walking in a 
favourable part of the road, he thought to slay 
him, saying to his attendants — "Behold this 
seducer and perverter of men comes, whose 
custom it is to practise deceits, to entrap many 
men, and to seduce them — let us go, therefore, 
and tempt him, and let us know if that God 
has any power in whom he boasts." 

And, thus tempting the holy man, they 
placed one of themselves under a blanket, and 
feigning him to be dead, in order to prove the 
Saint by this kind of deception. At the ap- 
proach of Saint Patrick and his disciples, they 
were exercising these subtilties and uttering 
prayers, and practising witchcraft and incan- 
tations — the gentiles said to him — " Behold one 
of us is now sick, approach, therefore, and 
perform some incantations of your sect over 
him, if perchance he may be healed." 



BOOK OF ARMAGH— LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 327 

Saint Patrick knowing all their stratagems 
and deceits, with constancy and intrepidity, 
said, " It were no wonder if he had been 
sick." His companions uncovering the face 
of him, pretending sickness, saw him dead. 
The gentiles wondering, and astonished at 
so great a miracle, said one to another, 
" Truly, this man is of God, we have done 
evil in tempting him." 

But Saint Patrick, having turned to Maccuil, 
says, " Why did you wish to tempt me ?" 
the cruel tyrant answered, " I am grieved at 
what I have done, whatever you command 
me, that I will do, and I now deliver myself 
into the power of your supreme God, whom 
you preach." The Saint said, " Believe, 
therefore, in my God, the Lord Jesus, and 
confess your sins, and be baptized in the name 
of the Father, and of the Son, and of the 
Holy Ghost." And he was converted in that 
hour, and believed in the eternal God, and 
moreover, was baptized. And now Maccuil 
added this, saying, " I confess to you, my 
holy Lord Patrick, that I proposed to slay 
you ; judge, therefore, how much I owe for 
so great a crime." And Patrick said, " I can- 
not judge — but God will judge." 



328 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

" Do you, therefore, depart now, unarmed, 
to the sea, and pass over quickly from this 
country of Ireland, taking nothing with you 
of your substance, except a common small 
coat, with which you may be able to cover 
your body, eating nothing and drinking 
nothing of the produce of this island, having 
a mark of your sin on your head ; and when 
you reach the sea, bind your feet together 
with an iron fetter, and cast the key of it into 
the sea, and embark in a boat, of one hide>* 
without rudder, or oar, and wherever the wind 
and tide shall carry you, be prepared to re- 
main, and to whatever land providence shall 
carry you, live there, and obey the divine 
commands." 

• And Maccuil said, " I will do so, as you 
have said, but concerning the dead man, what 
shall we do ?" and Patrick said, " He shall 
live, and shall rise again without pain ;" and 
Patrick called him to life in that hour, and he 
revived quite sound. 

And Maccuil departed thence very speedily 
to the sea, at the right of the plain of Inis, his 

* The cot or coracle, a basket-boat covered with a hide. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 329 

confidence being unshaken, he bound himself 
on the shore, casting the key into the sea, ac- 
cording to what was commanded him, and 
then he embarked in & little boat, and the 
north wind arose, and bore him to the south, 
and cast him on the island of Evonia, and 
he found there two men, very wonderful in 
faith and doctrine, who first taught the word of 
God and baptism in Evonia. 

And the men of this island were converted, 
by their doctrine to the Catholic faith, whose 
names are Conindri and Rumtli. But these 
two seeing a man of the same habit, wondered 
and pitied him, and lifted him out of the sea, 
the spiritual fathers received him with joy ; 
he, therefore, after finding himself in a region 
believing in God, conformed himself soul 
and body to their guidance, and spent the 
residue of his life with those two holy bishops, 
until he was appointed their successor in the 
bishopric. 

This is Maccuel Dimane, bishop aud prelate 
of Ardd Huimnonii. 

On another occasion Saint Patrick, resting 

on the Sabbath, by the sea, near a salt-pit, 

which is toward the northern side of the coun- 

u u 



330 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES^ 

try, no great distance from the hill Baotsr r 
heard an intemperate sound of the gentiles 
labouring on the Lord's day, making a rath r 
and having called them, Patrick forbid thero 
labour on the Lord's day ; but they did not at- 
tend to the words of the Saint,, nay more,, 
laughing, they mocked him ; and Saint Patrick 
said, " Mudebroth,* although you have la- 
boured, what you have . completed shall not 
profit you ;" on the following night a great 
wind arising, disturbed the sea, and the tern- 
pest destroyed all the labours of the gentiles* 
according to the words of the Saint. 

There was a certain man, rich and honorabfe 
in the eastern country, whose name was Daire T 
him Patrick asked to give him some place to 
exercise their religion* 

And the rich man said to the Saint, " What 
place do you require ?" " I ask you," said 
the Saint, "To give me that high spot of 
ground which is called Dorsum Salicis, and I 
will construct tltere a place for the purpose." 
But he was unwilling to give the Saint that 
high part, but he gave him another place, in 
a lower situation, where now is Fertie of the 

* Proud Slave, or Slave of Pride* 



feOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICE. 331 

martyrs, near Armagh, and Saint Patrick dwelt 
there with his followers. 

And after a short time a horseman of Daire's 
came, leading a horse, helonging to Daire, to 
feed in a grassy place. (Christi annorum*) 
The bringing down of the horse into his place 
•offended Patrick, and he said, " Daire has 
•acted foolishly in sending brutish animals to 
•disturb this holy place which he gave to 
GoxL" 

But the horseman, as if deaf, did not hear 
him, and as if dumb, not opening his mouth, 
spoke not, but having let out his horse there, 
for that night, departed. 

On the following day, in the morning, the 
horseman coming to see the horse, found him 
dead, and he returned sad, and said to his 
lord — " Behold ! the Christian has slain your 
iiorse, for the disturbance of his place offended 
him." And Daire said, " He also, shall be 
now slain, go and kill him." And as they 
were going, instantly death seized upon 
Daire — and his wife said — " The Christian is 
the cause of this, let some one go quickly, 



-* I cannot see the meaning of this. 



332 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

and let his blessings be brought to us, and lie 
shall be safe. And let them who went out to 
kill him be prevented and recalled." 

And the two men went out to slay him, 
who said to the Christian, concealing from 
him what had happened : " Behold ! Daire is 
sick, let something be brought to him from 
you, if perchance it may have the power to 
cure him." 

But Saint Patrick, knowing what had hap- 
pened, said, " Certainly." And he blessed 
water, and gave it to them, saying, " Gfo, 
sprinkle your horse with tljis water, and carry 
him with you;" and they did so, and the 
horse revived, and they carried him with 
them — and Daire was also restored by the 
sprinkling of holy water. 

And Daire came after this, that he might 
honour Saint Patrick, carrying with him a 
wonderful brazen foreign vessel, containing 
three measures, and Daire said to the Saint, 
" Take this brazen vessel with you ;" and 
Saint Patrick said, " grassichum"* And 
Daire returned home and said, " This is a 



Grasivhum — G ratios again — Thank you. 



« 

« 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 333 

foolish fellow, who said nothing good, ex- 
cept grassichum." Then Daire -sent again 
for the wonderful brazen vessel containing 
three measures, and said to his .servants, " Go, 
carry back to us our brazen vessel." And 
they departed, «nd said to Patrick, " We will 
scarry back the brazen vessel/ ' Aad Saint 
Patrick again replied, grassichum, " carry it 
off." And they bore it away. And Daire 
questioned his companions, saying, "What 
did the Christian say, have you not brought 
back the brazen vessel?" And they answered, 
He said, grassichum." And Daire answered, 
He says gras$ichum,wheji I give — and grassi- 
chum, when I take away." — They carried again 
to him the brazen vessel — and Daire caaae 
himself and earned the brazen vessel to Patrick, 
saying to him, " Take your brazen vessel with 
you, for you are a constant apd immoveable 
man ; and moreover, that part of the J$nd, 
which you formerly requested, I n<ow give you, 
as much as I have, a&d dwell there ;" that is 
the city, which is now called Armagh, A#d 
they both departed, Saint Patrick and Daire, 
that they might consider the wonderful of- 
ferings,- and the pleasing gift, and to ascend 
that height of ground. They found a deer, 
with her little fawn, lying in the place where 
is now an altar of the church of Armagh, 



334 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES* 

and the associates of Patrick rashly wished 
to slay the fawn, but the Saint was unwilling, 
and did not permit it ; but the Saint himself, 
holding the fawn, carried it on his shoulders, 
and the deer following him, even like a most 
attached sheep, until at length he let down 
the fawn in another wood, situated at the 
northern side of Armagh, where those per- 
sons skilled in such matters say, that some 
signs of his virtue remain even to this day.* 

There was a certain man, very severe and 
covetous, living in the plain of Inis. Those 
acquainted with the matter say, that he in- 
curred the scandal of folly and avarice, by 
one day taking away two of Patrick's draft 
oxen, after his holy labour in the cultivation 
of his own field ; while the oxen were resting 
and feeding themselves, he with force and 
violence, and in the very presence of Patrick 
himself, took them. Angry with him, Saint 
Patrick said, with a curse — " Mudebrod^\ you 
have acted ill, never shall your field profit you, 
nor shall it nurture your seed for ever — it shall 
now become useless/' And it so came to pass, 
for an inundation of the sea, very violent, 



* Aidus calls all this a fable. 
t Proud Slave. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S« PATRICK. 33d 

coming on the same day, inundated and cover- 
ed the entire field, and the before fruitful 
ground, according to the words of his pro- 
phecy, was converted into a salt-marsh, from 
the malice of the inhabitants — and it has re- 
mained in that sandy and unfruitful state, 
from the day on which Saint Patrick cursed 
it, even to the present day. 

[Here ends the first and begins the second Book.] 

Of the diligence of Patrick in prayer. 

Of the dead man speaking to him. 

Of the illumination of Sunday night, so that the 

horses were found. 
Of what the angel forbid to do, lest he should be 

exterminated. 
Of the burning bush in which the angel was. 
Of the four prayers of Patrick. 
• Of the day of his death, and of the time of bis 

life, for thirty years. 
Of the limits which he placed on the night* 
Of the darkness dissipated for twelve nights. 
Of the vigils of the first night, which the angels 

kept near the body of Patrick. 
Of the directions of the angel respecting his 

funeral. 
Of the fire breaking forth out of his tomb. 
Of the sea arising a second time, that there should 

not be war for his body. 
Of the happy bringing off of the people. 



336 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

But if any one should faithlessly wish to deny 
that the night was prolonged to them, and 
that the night was not perceptible oyer the 
whole province, for the short space in which 
the mourning for Patrick took place — let him 
hear and diligently consider in what manner 
the sun-dial of Achaz, was affected in the time 
of the Prophet Ezekiel, which may demon- 
strate the truth of what is here recited of 
Patrick. 



HIS mLlGENCK IN PRAYER. 

The psalms and hymns, and the revela- 
tions of John, and the spiritual canticles in 
scriptures, he daily sung', whether at home or 
proceeding on a journey, also with the sign of 
the cross at every hour of the day and night, 
crossing himself an hundred times, and at all 
the crosses which he saw, descending from 
his chariot for the purpose of prayer, he alight- 
ed there. Proceeding also on a certain 
day, he passed by a cross which was by the 
way-side, without seeing it : but the charioteer 
saw it. When they had arrived at the inn whi- 
ther they proceeded, and when they began to 
pray before meat, " I say," said the charioteer, 
" I saw a cross placed near the road by which 
we came." And Patrick having left the inn, 



BOOK OF ARMAGH— LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 337 

by the same road by which he came, proceed- 
ing to the cross, he prayed, and there he saw 
a sepulchre, and asked the buried man in his 
tomb, by what death he had departed, and in 
what faith faith he had lived ; and the dead 
man answered, " I lived a gentile, and was 
buried here/' 

A certain woman, living in another province, 
had a son who died, who was long separated 
from her, and was buried in her absence ; but, 
after some days, the mother, grieving for her 
lost son, by an unforeseen mistake, thinking 
the tomb of the gentile man to be the grave of 
her son, placed the cross, not beside him, but 
near the gentile ; and on this account St. Pa- 
trick said, he did not see the cross, because it 
was the place for burial of the gentiles ; and 
greater virtue arose from this, that the dead 
man should speak, and he who died in the faith 
of Christ should be known, and accordingly 
he caused the position of the cross to be al- 
tered in testimony of him who died in the true 
faith; 

Patrick would not depart from any place 
on any Sunday, in honour of the day ; but it 
was his custom, to rest from the evening of jthe 
Lord's night even to the morning of Monday, 

X X 



338 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

remaining all night in the plain, heavy with 
rain, and beaten by the tempest. But when 
the heavy rain committed devastations over 
the whole country in the place where the holy 
bishop was spending the night, he remained 
dry, as if under a shell, and in a fleece, as 
Gideon. His charioteer once told him that 
his horses were lost, he bewailed them as 
if they were his beloved friends — for he 
sought them through the darkness, not hav- 
ing light to guide him ; the piety of the 
holy father Patrick was excited, and he thus 
addressed the weeping charioteer: — " God 
is a ready helper in difficulties and in op- j 

portunities, he will afford his assistance, and 
you shall find the horses for which you 
are grieved." Whereupon, he elevated and 
extended his hand, the five fingers whereof 
exhibiting a luminous appearance, enlightened 
the objects around, and by the light of his 
extended hand, the charioteer found the 
horses which he had lost, and which oc- 
casioned his lamentation; but this miracle 
the charioteer concealed until the death of 
Patrick. 

After so many miracles, which have been 
written elsewhere, and which the world, with 
faithful mouth, celebrated, the day of his death 



BOOK OF ARMAGH LIFE OF S. PATRICK. 339 

approaching, an angel came to him, and spoke 
to him concerning it. Therefore, he desired 
to go to Armagh, for he preferred it above 
all lands. He then commanded, that many 
men should come to him, and convey him 
whither he wished to go, and, with his 
Companions, he began to enter on his journey 
towards Armagh, to the wished-for land j 
but, by the way-side a certain bush was on 
fire, but was not consumed, as formerly ap- 
peared to Moses in a bush. Victor was the 
angel who was often accustomed to visit 
Patrick, but he sent another angel to for- 
bid Patrick from proceeding whither he de- 
sired to go, who said to him, " Wherefore 
do you set out without the advice of Victor — 
why did Victor call you to him, and why did 
you disobey him V* and, as it was commanded 
him, he stopped, and asked what he ought to 
do j the angel answered, and said, "Return 
to the place from whence you came, that is 
Sabul, and the four prayers which you made, 
are accomplished for you." 

First prayer — That your ordination should 
take place in Armagh. 

Second prayer — That whoever should sing 
a hymn which was composed by you, on the 






340 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RfeSEARCHE*. 

day of departure from the body, you shall 
judge it as repentance of his sins. 

Third prayer — That the posterity of Dickon, 
who kindly received you, should experience 
mercy and not perish. 

Fourth prayer — That all the Irish on the 
day of judgment shall be judged by you, as 
it was said to the apostles, " And sitting on 
thrones, ye shall judge the twelve tribes of 
Israel,' 9 and as the apostles are to judge Israel, 
so shall you judge the Scots. 



" Return, therefore, as I say to you, and 
dying you shall enter upon the path of your 
fathers." Which was accomplished on the 
sixteenth day of the calends of April, having 
attained the age of one hundred and twenty, 
as is celebrated every year over the whole of 
Ireland, and kept sacred. Because on the 
day of his death there was no night, and for 
twelve days in that province in which his ob- 
sequies were performed, night did not appear, 
and did not embrace the earth witjr' dusky 
wings ; nor was the paleness of night great; 
nor was there obscurity requiring the illumi- 
nation of the stars. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — LIFE OF Si PATRICK, 341 

And the people of Ulster said, that even to 
the end of the whole year in which he depart- 
ed, never was such darkness at night as then ; 
which is doubtful, whether it ought to be de- 
clared, as proceeding from merit in. the man. 
But the hour of his death approaching, he re- 
ceived the sacrament from Tassach the bishop, 
that as the angel Victor said to him, he might 
receive the passport to eternal life. 

On the first night of his obsequies, angels 
kept watch over his body, with all kinds of 
vigils and psalms. Whatever men came to 
keep vigils on that first night, were overcome 
by sleep ; the angels praying and singing 
psalms, guarded the. body. 

But when the angels departed into heaven, 
they sent a most delightful odour as if of 
honey, and of sweet fragrance, as of wine, 
so that it filled the place, as is mentioned in 
the benediction of the blessed patriarch Jacob, 
" Behold ! the odour of my son, is like that of 
a plenteous field, which the Lord has blessed." 

But when the angel came to him, he gave 
him advice as to his burial, " Let two untamed 
oxen be allowed to proceed wherever they 
wish, and where they shall rest, let a church 



r 



342 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES* 

be founded there in honour of your body." 
And as the angel said, the unsteady steers 
were chosen, and a cart of steady weight was 
placed upon their shoulders, on which they 
carried the sacred body, and in the place which 
is called Clocher, at the east of Findubrec, they 
selected the oxen from among the cattle of 
Conail, and they departed, the son of God 
guiding them to Dun leth glaisse, where Patrick 
was buried. And he said to him, " Let not the 
remains of your body be brought back out of 
the earth, and let a cubit of earth be placed 
above your body ;" which was done accord- 
ing to the command of God, and was ma- 
nifested in after times, for when the church 
was building over his body, the men who were 
digging the foundation, perceived fire to break 
out from the grave, and retiring, they fled 
with fear from the flame. 

On account of the remains of Saint Patrick 
at the time of his death, a dire contention and 
war arose between the descendants of Nidi, 
and those of the eastern parts on one side, those 
who formerly were friends and neighbours, 
soon became the direst enemies. Even to the 
strait which is called CoUum Bovis, blood was 
shed on account of St. Patrick, and the mercy 
of God interposed the sea, shaking and swell- 



BOOK OF ARMAGrf— LIFE OF S. PATRICK 343 

ing with waves, and the hollow summits of 
the billows broke sometimes against the coast 
and promontories, and sometimes, with curled 
surge, rushed through the yellow vallies to 
the place of contest, as if to restrain the fury 
of the enraged nations ; and thus the fierce- 
ness of the sea arose and prevented the battle 
of the combatants. But afterwards, Patrick 
being buried, and the tumult of the sea abated, 
those from the eastern parts, and against them 
Ulta and the descendants of Neill, fiercely 
rush to the combat, and emulously prepared 
and armed themselves for war, at the place of 
the holy body, and broke forth as if impelled 
headlong by a happy deception, thinking that 
they should find the two oxen and the cart, 
and also recover the body of the Saint. — 
In a body, they proceeded, and with great pre- 
paration and array, even to the river Cab- 
cenna ,• and the body appeared not unto them, 
for it was not possible that their peace should 
be made by such and so holy a body, unless 
it had been so ordained by the will of God. 
These signs of the times were shewn, that 
an innumerable host of souls should be turned 
from destruction and death, unto salvation, 
by a happy deception, as the blinded Assy- 
rians of old would have perished but for the 
holy prophet Elisha, by whom, under divine 



344 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHED 

providence, they were led into Samaria ; and 
this deception also was made the means of 
producing concord among the people. 



Again the hour of prayer came round ; the 
angel, on every seventh day, was in the habit 
of coming ; and, as a man speaks with a man, 
Patrick enjoyed along the road the conversa- 
tion of the angel. He was taken captive in 
the 1 3th year of his age, and was in bondage 
for six years ; and thirty times did the angel 
come to him, and did he enjoy conference with 
the angel prior to his departure to the Latins 
from Scotia. He -prayed one hundred times 
in the day, and one hundred times in the night. 
Sometimes while tending the swine, he lost 
them ; and the angel, coming to him, pointed 
out the swine. Sometimes, also, the angel 
talked much to him ; and when he had spoken 
to him, placing his foot, left its impression on 
the rock on the mountain Mi$> he ascended 
before him, and the print is visible there 
even to this day. In that place he communed 
with him thirty times ; and the prayers of the 
faithful in this place would obtain the hap- 
piest results. 

Finit Amen. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — 'ANONYMOUS. 345 

Patrick carried with him to Sinnin, 50 
bells, 50 vessels, 50 cups, altars, books of 
the law, and books of the gospel, and left 
them in new places. 



*«* 



Patrick was baptized in his sixth year — taken 
captive in his twentieth — served in slavery 
twelve years — studied forty years— taught six- 
ty-one. His entire age was one hundred and 
eleven years. 



ANONYMOUS NOTICES. 

Patrick came from the plain of Airthice to 
Drammut Cerigi, and to Namnu Toisciart, to 
Ailich Esrachtce ; and had with him eight or 
nine men, with tablets in their hands, written 
after the Mosaic manner ; whom the Gentiles 
seeing, exclaimed that, as they had swords in 
their hands, they would slay the holy men. 
Wooden weapons were seen with them, but 
we think the swords were iron. The multi- 
tude desired greatly to abuse the holy men, 
and to shed their blood ; but there was a mer- 
ciful man among them, named Hercaith, of 



346 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

the family of Nathus, the father of Fereda- 
chus ; he believed the God of Patrick, and 
Patrick baptized him, and his son Feredachus. 
And he offered his son to Patrick, and he de- 
parted with Patrick for instruction for thirty 
years, who ordained him in the city of Rome ; 
and gave him the new name of Sachellus, and 
wrote for him a book of Psalms, which I saw, 
and he procured for him a portion of the re- 
liques of Peter and Paul, Lawrence and Ste- 
phen, which are preserved in MachL* 

Cartiacus and Sachellus, the clergymen, 
having ordained bishops and deacons of the 
church, without the knowledge or authority 
of Patrick, in the plain of Asm, he cursed 
them ; and sending letters to them, they were 
brought to Armagh, to Patrick, and there did 
penance. And he told them that they were 
not cf the great and true church. 



THE SAYINGS OF ST. PATRICK. 

I had the fear of God as the guide of my 
journey through Gaul, Italy, and the islands 
which are in the Terrene sea. 

* This refers to the 2d Patrick. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH SAYINGS OF S. PATRICK. 347 

For an age, God be thanked, you have been 
calling upon the churches of the Scots to en- 
ter paradise, in union with the Roman church, 
so that they, as Christians, may unite with 
you in the same service as the Romans. 

It behoves all the church which follow me, 
at all hours of prayer, to use that very praise- 
worthy sentence, Curie lession, Christe lession. 
For all churches should sing, Cyrie lession, 
Christe lession, deo gratias, 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 



TiRECHAN's COLLECTIONS CONCERNING ST. 

PATRICK. 

The following written memoranda concern- 
ing St. Patrick, were from the mouth or book 
of Ultan the bishop, by Tirechan, the bishop, 
his pupil and disciple. 

I have found four names given to Patrick, 
in the book of Ultan, Bishop of Connor.* 
Magonius, which is renowned,* Succetus, which 
is Patrick; Cothirthac, because he served in 
four houses of the Magi. One of them, whose 
name was Miliuc Mac Cuboin, a magician, 
bought him and kept him four ygars, and sub- 
jected him to every slavery, and to double 
labour, and made him a swine-herd in the 
mountains and vallies. At this time, an angel 
of the Lord, named Victor, visited him in his 



* Ware erroneously reckons Ultan among the Bishops 
of Meath. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TIRECHAtf. 349 

sleep, at the top of the mountain Scirte, near 
the mountain Miss.. The communication of 
the angel was to this effect. — " ho / your ship 
is ready j rise and walk." And he left him 
and ascended into heaven. ' Patrick rose up 
and walked, as the angel of the Lord com- 
manded him. 

In the 17th year of his age, he was taken, 
brought over, and sold in Ireland. In the 
22d year of his age, or rather of his labours, 
he was able to escape. In the other years, as 
he said, in recruiting his labours, he sailed 
over the waves, and walked over the country 
parts, and through vallies, and over moun- 
tains, through Gaul, and all Italy, and the 
islands which are in the Terrene sea. 

He was* in one of those islands, which is 
called Aralanensis, thirty years, as was testi- 
fied to me by Ultan, the bishop. But of what 
happened to him, as clearly related in his his- 
tory, these are his latest miracles, which were 
accomplished after the second year of the 
reign of Logaire, the son of Neill. 

From the passion of Christ to the death of 
Patrick, there were four hundred and thirty- 
six years. 



350 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

Loigare reigned two, or five years*, after the 
death of Patrick. The entire length of his 
reign is computed by us at thirty-three years. 

Patrick, indeed, came with the Gauls to the 
islands of Mac Euchor, the most eastern of 
which is still called the island of Patrick. 
With him there were a multitude of holy 
bishops, presbyters, deacons, exorcists, hos- 
tiarii, and readers, as well as their sons, whom 
he ordained. 

He afterwards went up from the sea to the 
plain of Brieg, at sun-rise, with the blessing 
of God, and the true sun of wonderful doc- 
trine, the great morning star, he commenced 
dispelling the dark shades of ignorance in 
Ireland. The holy bishop arose, and was un- 
remittingly, from time to time, before the altar, 
in the name of the Lord God the Father, and 
of the Son, and the Spirit of the holy and 
merciful Jesus Christ. This is called, in the 
language of the Scots, Ochen. 

He came to the valley of Sesenan, and built 
there the first church ; and having brought his 

* The scribe could not tell whether the numeral was ii, 
two, or u,Jive, they are so similar in the oldest Irish MSS. 



BOOK OP ARMAGH-— TIRECHAN. 351 

son, named Sesceneus, with him, as bishop, 
left him there with two foreign boys. One 
evening, coming to the gate of Attbina y to a 
certain good man, he baptized him, and his 
son, having pleased him. He gave him the 
name of Benignus, because he gathered the 
feet of Patrick between his hands and breast, 
and would not remain with his father and mo- 
ther, but cried, unless he should be permitted 
to sleep with Patrick. 

In the morning, when was about to depart, 
having finished his blessing on the father of 
Benignus, Patrick was ascending his chariot, 
had one foot in it, and the other on the ground, 
the boy, Benignus, held fast the foot of Patrick 
in both hands, and cried out, " Suffer me to 
go with Patrick, my real father ;" and Patrick 
said, " Baptize him, and raise him into the 
chariot, for he is the heir of my kingdom." 
This is Benignus the bishop, successor of 
Patrick in the Church of Macha. 

The number of bishops whom he ordained 
in Ireland, amounted to four hundred and 

fifty. 

The number of priests we cannot say, 
because he baptized men every day, and read 



362 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

to them letters and primers ; and of the rest 
he made priests, for they received baptism at 
a proper and sedate age. 

Of the Bishops. 
Benignus, Bronus, Sachellus, Cathiacus, 
Carthactos, Cartenus, Connanus, Fintranus, 
Siggeus, CEternus, Sencaticus, Olcanus, Iborus, 
Ordius, Nazarius, Miserneus, Senachus, Se- 
cundinus, Gozachus, Camulacus, Auxilius, 
Victorious, Bressialus, Feccus, Menathus, Cen- 
nannus, Nazarus, Mel us, Maceleus, Mactaleus, 
Culeneua, Asacus,Bitheus, Falertus, Sesceneus, 
Muirethchus, Temoreris, who built the holy 
church Cairce, which the family Clonoaviss 
held ; Daigneus, Justianus, Mac Hii Daimene, 
Oloanus, Domnallus, and very many others. 

Of the Priests. 
Anicius, Brocidius, Amirgenus, Lommanus, 
Catidens, Catus, Catanus, Broscus, Ailbetis, 
Trianus. The names of the three bishops of 
the Franks consecrated by Patrick, Inrepius, 
Bernicius, Hernicius.— Sub-deacons, Seman, 
Semen, Canoen. — Bernicius, the deacon, and 
Ernicius twelve Franks, with one sister, 
(or vi. or iii.) — Cassanus, Conlang, Erclung, 
Brocanus, Roddanus, Brigson, and the other 
Roddanus, who founded the church ; Senem, 



BOOK OF ARMAGH— TIRECHAN. 353 

grandson to Ailellus, because the monks of 
Patrick held Gengen and Sannuch. 

Of the Deacons. 
Ivostus, the deacon who baptized Ceranus, 
the son of the workman of Patrick. — Corin- 
manus, the deacon, beloved by Patrick, who 
was in the great church of Airdlicca. — Ol- 
canus, the monk who was in the great cell 
of Muaida, was made a priest ; we know that 
two exorcists were with him, and the exorcist 
Losca in the back of Dairi. 

In the regions of Tuirtri, were other exor- 
cists. In the plain of Liphi. Of the churches 
which he founded in the plain of Breg — 1st. 
in Culmine. — 2d. the church of Cerne, in which 
Hercus was buried, who attained a great age. — 
3d. in the tops of Aisse. — 4th. in Bladine. — 5th. 
in Collumbce, in which he ordained Eu genius, 
the holy bishop. — 6th. the church of the son 
of Laithphi. — 7th. Imbrida, in which was the 
holy and- beloved brother of Carthasus — 8th. 
that in Angetbor, in which was Kannanus, the 
bishop, whom Patrick ordained at the begin- 
ning of Easter. 

HiffertuSy of the men of Feicc, was the first 

who burned incense, and carried wax-candles ; 

z z 



354 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES, 

fo first took them home from the hands of Patrick, 
and caused the holy smoke to ascend into the 
eyes and nostrils of the gentile-men, and of 
king Loigaire, and of his magicians ; because 
three brothers opposed him, magicians of the 
same father — Oruth, Loch, Lethlanii, of the 
family of Runtir, who made great opposition 
against Patrick and Benignus. The cloak of 
the magician was burned round Benignus, and 
reduced to ashes ; but the pious youth wa» pre- 
served safe by the faith of .God, in the sight 
of the king, of the people, and of the ma- 
gicians ; but the cloak of Benignus, the dis- 
ciple of Patrick, being fixed steady round the 
magician, he was set on fire in the midst of 
them, and was consumed. Patrick said, 
" In this hour, all the gentile faMh in Ireland is 
consumed" And Patrick lifted up his hands 
to God, about the magician Lock Letheus, and 
said, " Lord, cast away from me this dog, 
who barks at thee to thy face, and' let him die" 
and they all saw the magician raised up 
through the shades of flight even to the heavens, 
but his dead body, glued together, mixed with 
hail and snow, and ignited sparks, returned 
to the earth, and fell before the ; faces of all^ 
and became petrified, and remains a stone in 
the soirth-eastern coasts, even to ; the pre- 
sent day, arid I- bfcheld-it with my- own eyes. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH— TIRECHAN, 365 

On Sunday, he came to TtUtena, where Agon 
was- king, to Coirpritieus, the son of : Nettl> 
who wished to slay him, and flogged his 
servants in the river Sele, which act of Coit± 
priticus was told Patrick, who called him an 
enemy of God, and said to him " Thy seed 
shall serve the seed of thy brothers, and (here 
shall not be a king of thy seed far ever, and 
there shall never be great fish hereafter in iht 
river Sele" 

Soon after he came to the house of Cona$us> 
the son of NeiU, which stood in the place 
where at this day, is the church of the great 
Patrick ; and he received him with joy, and 
was baptised, and Patrick confirmed his throne 
for ever, and said to him* « The seed of thy 
brothers shall serve thy seed for ever 9 but you 
and your sons, and your son's sons, ought to deal 
mercifully unto my sons and successors, who 
faithfully believe for ever;" and he ordained 
that the length of the church of the God of 
Patrick 4 should be sixty feet, and Patrick said, 
" If the church be lessened, thy reign shall not 
belong, nor firmly established." 

Easter Sunday being past, he departed to 
the ford M ola, (Broon) and there founded a 
church, in which he left three brethren with 



356 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

one sister ; and these are their names CatJueceus, 
Cathurus, Caineus, and their sister Catnea ; 
who milked the wild does, as old people have 
told me. 

And he went again to the city of Temoria 
to Lotgatre, the son ot Neill, because with him 
he had ratified a league, that he should not 
be slain while he was king. But he would 
not believe, though spoken to, for he said, 
Neill, my father suffered me not to believe, but 
ordered, that I should be buried in the tops of 
Temoria, like men standing up in war, for the 
gentiles are accustomed to be entombed armed, 
with their weapons ready, face to face, in which 
manner they remain among the magicians, even 
to the day of Erdatha — that is, to the day of 
the Lord — Ithe> son of Neill, the son of Dun- 
linge of Immaiften, in the plain of Liphi, hated 
him for such harshness as this. 

Soon after, he founded the church of Icarrie 
Dagri, and another church Immruig Thuaithe; 
and he wrote letters to Cerpanus. And hav- 
ing entered into the royal palace, they did 
not rise up before him, except Hercus, the 
layman, and he said to him, " Why have 
you only arisen to honour my God in my per- 
son?" And Hercus said to him, " I know not 



BOOK OF ARMAGH' — TIRECHAN. 367 

why, but by God's power, ignited sparks as- 
cended from your lips to mine" The Saint 
also said to him, " If you will be baptized in the 
Lord, you shall receive what I have power to give 
you" He answered, " J will receive" And 
they came to the fountain, which is called in 
the Scottish tongue Loigles, but with us the 
calf of cities. And having opened the book 
and baptized Hercus, he heard men behind 
his back, deriding him for that which he 
was doing, because they knew not what he 
did. And he baptized many thousand men on 
that day. Among their opinions of baptism, 
he heard the following : — Behold, two noble- 
men were discoursing 1 ' behind him, and said 
one to another, " What thou sayest is true, it 
was foretold from the circle of the year which 
has passed by, that you would come hither in 
those days;" and he said, "Tell me your 
name, I entreat you, and that of your father 
and of your country, and of your house and 
residence/ 9 He answering, said, " I am the son 
of Amolngid, the son of Fechrach, the son of 
Echach, from the western country, from the 
plain of Donmon, and from the wood of Foch- 
loth" And when he heard the name of his 
father and the wood Fochloth, he rejoiced 
greatly, and said to him, " Endeus, the son of 
Amolngid, I will go with you if I live, because 



358 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

the Lard commanded me that I should go. 79 
And Endeus said, " You shall not go with me> 
lest we be both slain. 7 ' The Saint then said j 
" You shall never arrive at your country yunlesw 
I shall go with you, and you shall not have 
eternal life, because you came here on my ac+ 
county like Joseph before the children of Israel 77 
But Endeus said to Patrick, " Do you baptize 
my son, because he is of tender age, but I and 
my brethren cannot believe you, until we 
come to our own people, lest those people 
laugh at us." ConaUus was accordingly bap- 
tized, and Patrick gave him his benediction, 
and held his hand, and gave him to Cathiacus 
the bishop, and he brought . him up, and Ca- 
thiacus taught him, and Mucneus 9 the brother 
of - Cathiacus, the bishop, whose remains are in 
the great church of Patrick^ in the wood of 
Fochloih. On this account Cathiacus entrusted 
his island to ConaUus , and it remains in that 
family even to the present day, because he 
was a layman after the death of Saint Ca- 
thiacus. 

The six sons of Amolngid sought a decision 
of their cause before the face of Loigaire 9 and 
Endeus was one of them ; and his son was of 
tender age, and Patrick was appealed to be- 
fore them, and investigated their title of heir- 



BOOK OF ARMAGH— T1RECH AN. 359 

ship. And Lmgaire and Patrick adjudged, 
that they should divide the inheritance into 
seven parts. But Endem said, " I offer my 
son and my portion of the inheritance to the 
God of Patrick, and to Patrick himself ; and 
on this account, some say, we are the ser- 
vants of Patrick, even to the present day. 

And they formed a covenant/ through the 
mediation of Loigaire, the son oi Neill, Pa- 
trick and the sons of Amolngid, the army of 
laymen, and saints, with • the holy bishops ; 
and they . entered upon their journey ixr the 
mountain :Egli.* And Patrick paid the sum 
the law ordained for an escort of twelve men, 
in addition to a donation of silver and gold, 
that he might be protected from any ill-dis- 
posed person, who should impede or injure 
them on their journey across Ireland. Be- 
cause necessity obliged them to pass through 
the wood of Fochloth, before the beginning of 
the year, on the second. Easter, because of 
the children exclaiming with great clamour, 
He heard them in their mothers' womb saying, 
"* Come, Saint Patrick, save us" 



•I ' "» >■ 



* Croagh Patrick, 



360 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

He founded a church at the ford Segi, ano- 
ther church at Cinnena Sancta, on the ford of 
Carnoi Imboind, another on Coirp Rait he, and 
another upon the mound of Doll Bronig, be- 
cause the bishop, the son of Cartin, the ma- 
ternal uncle of Saint Bridget, possessed it. 
He founded another in the plain of Echredd, 
another m the plain of Taideri, which is 
called Cellbile, in the family of Scvrest ; ano- 
ther in the plain of Echnach, in which was 
Cas8anu8 the priest ; another in Singitibw ; 
another in the plain of Bill, near the ford of 
Capitis Canis ; another in Capite CarmeUi, in 
the plain of Teloch, in which Saint Bridget 
took the veil, at the hands of the son of 
Caille. 

In Huisniuch Midi, he remained near the 
rock of Coithrigi, where some of his foreigners 
were slain by the son of Fechach 9 the son of 
NeiU, whom Patrick cursed, saying, " There 
shall not be a king of your line, but you shall 
serve the seed of your brethren" He founded 
another church in the head of Airt, in the re- 
gions of Roide, in which he placed an altar 
of stone, and another at Hicuil Corre. And 
he came through the river Ethne to the two 
Tethbrias ; and ordained Melus bishop, and 
founded the church of Bili, and ordained 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — TIRECHAN. 361 

Gosactus, the son of Milcon Mac Cubooin, 
whom he educated in his seven years sla- 
very. And sending Camulacus, of the Com- 
miensium, to the plain of Cuini, and pointed 
out to him with his finger the situation of the 
church of Raithin, from the summit of Gra- 
neret. 

And he came to the plain of Rein, and or- 
dained Bruscus priest, and founded for him a 
church ; he thus spoke wonderfully, after his 
death, to another saint who was in the island 
ef the family of Cotirbi, " You are blest, 
whilst you have your son, but I am grieved be- 
cause my death has left me alone in a church 
in a desart, in a church forsaken and vacated; 
for the priests do not associate near me at night, 
and visions arise to my imagination" 

On the third day, the Saint arose and took 
a ring, an earthen vessel, and a spade, and 
dug up the mound of the grave, and took 
away the bones of Saint Bruscus with him, to 
the island where they still remain. 

But Patrick sent Methbrain to the hill of 

Slecht, the barbarian neighbour of Patrick, 

who was speaking wonderful truths by God's 

assistance. And Patrick came $o the channej 

a a a 



362 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

of Sinom, to the place where his charioteer 
Boidmcdus, died and was buried, for which 
reason it is called Cail Boidmail, even to the 
present day, and it was consecrated by Pa- 
trick* 

The first book ends in the country of the 
posterity of Neill. The second begins and 
concludes in the country of ConnachL 



All whieh I have written from the begin-* 
ning of this book, ye know, because they 
were performed in your country, except a few 
things which I have discovered as the fruits of 
my labour, from many old people, and from 
Ultanus himself, the bishop of Connor, who 
brought me up and first informed me. But 
my heart reflects within me, concerning the 
love of Patrick, because I see the disturbers, 
builders, predatory chiefs, and soldiers of 
Ireland, whom I hate, possessing Patrick's 
patrimony ; for they took away from him 
what was his, and they are afraid, if the suc- 
cessor of Patrick should again demand his 
patrimony, they should be compelled to re- 
store him nearly the whole island — because 
God gave him 



BOOR OF AftMAGH — TIRECHAN. 363 

I. The Whole island, with its inhabitants, 
by thp ajagel of the Lord. 

II. And he taught them the law of the Lord. 

III. And baptised them with the baptism of 
God. 

IV. And pointed out the cross of Christ. 

V. And related his resurrection. 

But they do not love his family, because it 
is not lawful to. swear against him or upon 
him. And it is not lawful to raise the club 
against him, because all the first fruits of 
the church of Ireland are his ; but every 
thing is sworn by him which is sworn. 

Every thing which I have written from the 
beginning of this book, is in full. But every 
thing which remains, shall be more concise- 



.aa. 



Saint Patrick afterwards . came through the 
channel of the river Sinne, through the ford 
of the two birds, to the plain of AL Two 
brothers, Calerus and Capitolanuim, the ma- 
gicians of Loigaire, the son of Neill, who 
brought up the two daughters of Loigaire, 
Ethne the fair* and Fedelm Nufa y hearing what 
had been done, and fearing lest they should 
imbibe the opinions of the holy man, were 



364 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

very indignant, and caused the darkness bf 
night and thick obscurity to cover the whole 
plain of At. We know not by whose poWer 
this happened ; but we know that this night 
was the length of three entire days and nights. 
And the Saint fasted for three days and three 
nights, and with one hundred prayers, and 
constant prostrations, entreated God, the king 
of kings, and all the magic weight of dark- 
ness fled from the plain of AL And he re- 
turned God thanks* And they came through 
the channel of the river Sinne, which is called 
Bandea, to the mount Gradi, in which place 
he ordained the holy Albeus a priest, for 
whom he pointed out a wonderful stone altar, 
in the mountain of the descendants of AilelluS) 
for he was among the descendants of Ailellus* 
And he baptized Saint Maneus, whom bishop 
Bronus, the son of Josus, the servant of God, 
and the companion of Patrick, ordained. 
They came to the plain of Glais, and there 
placed a cell, which is called the great cell, 
and there he left two bearded monks, Conleng 
and Erdengi 

He then came to Assicus and Bisius, and to 
the magicians who were of the race of Corcu 
chon luain Bono and Ith, brothers ; one of 



BOOK OF ARMAGH— TIRECHAN. 365 

whom received Patrick and his saints with 
joy, and offered him his house. 

And he went to Imbliuch Hornon, to whom 
Patrick said, « Thy seed shall be blessed, and 
from thy seed shall arise priests of the Lord, 
and chief men, worthy of my compassion, and 
of being your heirs." And he placed there 
Assicus and Betheus, the son of brother Assi- 
cus, and Cipia, the mother of Betheus, the 
bishop. 

Assicus, the holy bishop, was brass- worker 
to Patrick, and made altars and book-cases,* 
which he made in plates, for the honour of 
Patrick the bishop, and also the three square 
plates"f" well finished, which I saw — that isr to 
say, the plate for the church of Patrick, in 
Armagh, and another in the church of Alqfind, 
and the third in the great church of Saul, be- 
yond the altar of Saint Felart, the bishop. 

Assicus fled to the northern country, to the 
stony mountain, and was seven years in the 



* This alludes to those brazen cases, in which are found 
the books of Columb-kill, Dimma, and others. 

t The patinae, or sacramental salvers. 



366 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

island called Roekuit, behind the stony moun- 
tain, and his monks went to seek him, and 
found him in a valley of the mountain engaged 
in the labours of his trade ; his monks withdrew 
him thence, and he died amongst them, in the 
desart mountains; and they buried him in 
Hirraith Ghungai Hisertip. 

The king gave to him and to his monks, 
after his death, hay for one hundred cows, with 
their calves, and for twenty oxen, as a perpe- 
tual offering, because he said, " He would 
not return to the plain of Ai, because they 
told a falsehood ;" his bones are in the plain 
of Sered Hirraith Chungi, with the monks of 
Patrick, but the monks of Columb CUle 9 and 
of Aird Stratha, contended for him. 

Patrick then came from the fountain Alo- 
findaddn to Meeham, the grandson of Aihllus, 
and founded in that place a church, which is 
called Senetta cella Dumiche to this day, where 
he left the holy men Macet, and Cetgen, and 
Rodanus, the priest. 

And there came with him a daughter of d 
foreigner, named Mathona, sister of Benignus, 
the successor of Patrick, who took the veil by 
the hands of Patrick and Rodanus ; she became 



BOOK OF ARMAGH— TIRECHAN. 367 

a recluse, and departed with- them through the 
mountain of the sons of Ailelhis, and she 
founded there a free church in Hitamnuch, and 
was honoured by God and man ; and she 
had great veneration for the reliques of. Saint 
Rodanus, and his successors were feasted . by 
her. 

After this, they placed .bishops in the holy 
church of Hitamnuch, whoih the priests of 
Patrick, that is Br onus and Beiheus, ordained. 
They sought nothing from the family of 
Dumiche, but friendship alone, but they de-s 
manded more from the family of C/bno, be-* 
cause, by force, they kept many of the places 
which belonged to Patrick, after the death 
of the last possessors.* And then Saint Pa*- 
triek came to the fountain, which is called 
Clebach, on the sides of CrocJian, opposite 
the rising sun, and they settled themselves 
near the fountain ; and behold the two daugh- 
ters of king Loigaire, Ethne, the fair, and Fe- 
delmnufa, came in the morning to bathe after 
the manner of women, and they found the 
holy bishop Senodus with Patrick near the 
fountain. And they were ignorant whence 
they might be. Or of what form, 

* Refused to comply with the bequests of deceased persons. 



368 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

Or of what people, 
Or of what country. 

But they imagined that they w^re men of 
Side, or of the gods of the earth, or phantoms. 
The girls said to them, " Who are ye, 
and whence do you come ?" And Patrick 
said to them, " Were it not better you should 
confess the true God, thai* to ask our ra.ce ?" 

The eldest daughter said, " Who is God ? 
and where is God? and where is his dwelling? 
has your God sons and daughters, gold and 
silver ? does he live for ever ? is he handsome ? 
has he many sons ? are his daughters beautiful 
and beloved by the men of this world ? is he 
in heaven or on earth ? 

In the sea, 

In the rivers, 

In the mountains, 

In the vallies ; 

Tell us his description, 

How he can be seen, 

How he is to be respected, 

How he is to be found, 

Whether in youth or age ? 

But Saint Patrick answering, filled with the 
holy spirit, said, " Our God is the God of all 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — rTIRECHAN. 369 

men, the God of heaven and earth, and of 
the sea, and of rivers ; the God of the sun, 
and of the moon, and of all the stars ; the 
God of the lofty mountains, and of the lower 
vallies ; God is above the heavens, and in 
heaven, and under heaven ; his habitation is 
above the heavens, and the earth, and the 
sea, and all things which are therein : 

He inspires all things, 

He enlivens all things, 

He overcomes all things, 

He supports all things, 

He enlightens the sun. 
He strengthens the light of night and our 
knowledge — he made fountains in dry places, 
and dry islands in the sea, and he placed the 
'stars for the office of greater lights. He has 
a son, who is coeternal with himself, nor is the 
son younger than the father, nor the father 
older than the son, and the holy spirit breathes 
in them ; the father, son, and holy spirit, are 
inseparable. 

" But I wish that ye were united to the hea- 
venly king, as ye are the daughters of an 
earthly king." And the girls said, " If with 
one mouth and heart, we are able to believe 
the heavenly king, teach us most carefully that 

we may see him face to face, point him out to us ; 

Bbb 



370 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

and we will do as you desire us." And Patrick 
said, " Do ye believe, that by baptism ye will 
cast away the sin of your father and mother ?" 
They answer, " We believe." " Do you be- 
lieve repentance after sin ?" " We believe." 
" Do ye believe the life after death ? Do ye 
believe the resurrection on the day of judg- 
ment?" " We do believe." " Do ye believe 
the unity of the church ?" " We believe." 

They were then baptized, and he placed a 
white dress on their heads. 

And they requested to see the face of Christ, 
but the Saint said to them, " Unless ye taste 
of death, ye cannot see the face of Christ, 
and unless he receive your sacrifice." 

And they answer, " Give us the sacrifice, 
that we may be able to see his son, our spouse." 
And they received them for the love of God, 
and when sleeping in death, they placed 
them in a little bed, covered with clothes, 
and they made lamentations. 

And he came to the plain of Caeri, and 
they encamped at Icuil Core, and he founded 
a church in that place, and baptized many ; 
and went thence to the plain of Foinson, and 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TJRECHAN. 371 

he found there two brothers, sons of a man 
named Coiliud, the son of Luchti, the son of 
Conlaid, Lucteus, and Dorelaid, the latter sent 
his servant to slay Patrick. 

But Lucteus delivered him, to whom Patrick 
said, " There shall be bishops and priests of 
your race, but as to the race of your brother, 
they shall be cursed, and shall fail in a short 
time ; and he left in that place Conanus the 
priest. 

And he departed to the fountain of Strin- 
gille, in the deserts, and remained there two 
Sundays, and departed thence to the plain of 
Raithin. He then went to the termination of 
Humail Duachud Fobuir, in which place 
bishops were ordained. There also, came to 
him a holy daughter, who took the veil at the 
hands of Patrick. And he ordained the son 
of Senachus, her father, and gave him a new 
name, that is Agnus dei, and made him a 
bishop. 

And he made prayers to the father, that 
he should not sin thereafter, and should not 
be called by his name in that place, and that 
his own deficiency, arising from old age, 
should be supplied by the maturity of his 



372 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

son's, Oignus by name, for whom he had 
written " the father's primer" on the day 
in which Senachus was ordained ; because 
Patrick consecrated the church in that place* 
near Mathona, and he said to them, " There 
shall be good bishops here and their seed 
shall be blessed for ever in this church," that 
is, Achad Fobuir, and they accepted the mass* 
of Patrick. 

Patrick then proceeded to the mountain of 
Egli^f that he might fast there forty days and 
forty nights, according to the example of 
Moses, and Helios, and Christ And his cha- 
rioteer, Himuvrisce, died at Aigli, that is the 
plain between the sea and Aiglif and they 
buried the charioteer naked, and collected 
stones for his tomb and said, " Let this be so 
for ever, and let it be visited even to the latest 
ages." And Patrick went to the summits of 
the mountain to the top of Crochan Aigli, nr\d 
remained there forty days and forty nights> 
and large flocks of birds beset him, aud he 
could not see the earth, or the sky, or the 
sea, for all the saints of Ireland being passed 
by, God said, that he would be present to 



A ..1 rf, 



* Missam. 
t Croagh Patrick. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — TIRECHAN. 373 

them, " Go up, Q holy men ! the mountain 
which o'er tops, and is higher than all the 
mountains which lie to the west, to bless the 
people of Ireland, that Patrick may see the 
fruit of his labour, because the choir of all 
the Irish saints, came to him to visit their 
father." And he founded a church in the plain 
of HumaiL . 

And he came to the regions of Corcutemore, 
to the fountain of Sini, where he baptized a 
thousand men, he also founded three churches 
in Toga. 

, . % . • ■ *.*■ • - * 

And he came to the fountain of Find maige, 
which is called Slan, because it was indicated 
to him that the magi honoured this fountain, 
and made donations to it as gifts to God. 

..The fountain, was square, $,nd there was'a 
square stone in the mouth of it, and the water 
came over the stone, that is r through the in- 
terstices, as $>f the trace of a king ; and the un- 
believers said, that a -certain dead prophet 
made himself a study, in the water under the 
rock, that he might whiten his bon6s, for t he 
feared to- be burned with fire ; for they wor- 
shipped the fountain like a God, which was 
unlawful in the eyes of Patrick,- because of the 



374 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

adoration, for he had a zeal for God — even 
for the living God. 

He said, " It is not true, what ye say, that 
the king of waters is a fountain;" because they 
gave to him the name water, not king — and 
the magicians and the gentiles of that country, 
and a great multitude beside, were assembled 
at the fountain. And Patrick said to them, 
" Raise up the rock, let us see what is under- 
neath, if there are bones or not, for I say unto 
you, that the bones of the man are not under ; 
but I think there is some gold and silver, ap- 
pearing through the joinings of the stones ; 
from your wicked sacrifices," and they could 
not lift the stone. 

And Patrick blessed the stone and his ser- 
, vants, and said to the multitude, " Retire apart 
for a little, that ye may perceive the power of 
my God, who dwells in the heavens." And 
he lifted the stone with expert hands from 
the mouth of the fountain, and he placed 
it where it now remains, and they found 
nothing in the fountain but water only, and 
they believed the supreme God. And there 
sat down, beside the stone, a little way off, a 
certain man named Cata, whom Patrick blessed, 
and he baptized him, and said to him, " Thy 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TIRECHAN. 375 

seed shall be blessed for ever." There was a 
little cell in Tog, m the country of Corcuteimne, 
belonging to Patrick — Cainnechus the bishop, 
a monk of Patrick's, founded it. 

And Saint Patrick came through the plains 
into the countries of Maicc Hercce Indichuil, 
and of Aurchuil, and Patrick came to Indichuil, 
to a tomb of great magnitude, and wonder- 
ful length, which his followers found, and 
which greatly astonished them, it extended 120 
feet long. And they said, " We do not believe 
this affair, that the man was of the length." 
Patrick answered, and said, " If ye will, 
ye shall see him." And they said, " We 
would." And he struck with his staff the 
stone near his head, and marked the tomb with 
the sign of the cross and said, * * 

* * (defaced in MS.) * * 
and the tomb opened, and the huge saint 
arose quite sound, and said, " It is well, O holy 
man, thou hast revived me, and in one hour 
from all my afflictions," * * * 

* * {defaced in MS.) * * 
" We cannot wish that you should walk as 
we do, because the people cannot see your face 
through fear of you, but believe in God of 
heaven, and receive the baptism of the Lord, 



376 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

and return not to what you were, and declare 
to us who you are." 

" I am Mace Maicc Cats tnaic Glais, who 
one hundred years since this day, was a swine- 
herd of king Lugirrig Hirotie in Galavatine, 
Flan mace maicc Con, in the kingdom of 
thirpri nioth fer." He was baptized, and 
made confession to God, and became again 
silent,' and was replaced in his tomb. 

And he came into the white plain, in the 
country of the posterity of Maini, and found 
there the sign of the cross of Christ, in t^o 
n^w sepulchres ; ahd the Saint said from his 
chariot, i€ Who is it that is buried here ?" 
and a voice answered from the sepulchre, 
" Behold ! I am a gentile man." The Saint 
answered, " Why is the holy cross fixed near 
you ?" And he again replied, « Because the 
maii,. who is,;buried beside tine, requested his 
mother to place the sign of the cross near his 
tomb; a stupid man, by mistake, placed it 
beside me." And Patrick leaped down from 
his chariot, and took hold of the cross, and 
pulled it from the grave of the gentile, and 
placed it at the head of the baptized man, and 
ascended into his chariot, and prayed to God 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — TIRECHAN. 377 

in silence. When he said, u Deliver us from 
evil" his charioteer said to him, " Why did 
you call the unbaptized gentile ?" " Be- 
cause I mourn that the man should be without 
baptism ; it were better to intreat God to bless 
him with baptism, and to pour the baptismal 
water upon the tomb of the deceased." And 
he did not answer him, for I think that he 
forsook him, because God did not wish to 
save him. 

Let us return to our history. He came to 
Pernuadam, and behold the magicians, of the 
sons of Amolngid, heard that the Saint came 
into the country, a very great crowd of magi- 
cians assembled, with the chief magician, 
named Recradus, who wished to slay Patrick ; 
and he came to them with nine magicians, clad 
in white garments, with a magical host. And 
Patrick, and Endceus, son of Amolngid, and 
Conallus, son of Endceus, saw him at a distance 
whilst Patrick was baptizing a great multitude, 
and when Endceus saw him, he rose and 
snatched up arms to repel the magicians, for 
they were distant from them on the other side 
of the water, a thousnd paces ; but Patrick sent 
Conallus, son of Endceus, to meet the magi- 
cians, that they, knowing him, might not slay 

them. The illustrious youth stood near the 

c c c 



378 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

magician, and behold Saint Patrick stood up, 
and raised his left hand to the God of heaven, 
and cursed the magician, and he fell dead in 
the midst of his magicians, and the crowd was 
scattered over the whole plain of Domnon, and 
he was burned before the face of all for a sign 
of vengeance, and all the people saw this mi- 
racle. He baptized many on that day, and or- 
dained Mucneus, the brother of Cathacus, and 
gave him seven books of the law, which he 
left after him to Mace Cerce, the son of Mate 
Dregin. And he founded a church at the 
wood of Fockloth, in which are the bones of 
Sai^t Mucneus, the bishop, because God said 
to him, that he should leave the law and or- 
dain priests and deacons in that region. And 
he blessed Amolgid, the son of Fergussus, the 
brother of EndtBm> because in his country he 
had acted virtuously. 

And behold a man, came to them, named 
Mace Dregin, with seven sons, gentiles, and 
required the baptism of God from Patrick, 
who blessed him and his sons ; and chose one 
of them, whose name was Mace Ercce, and 
he wrote lessons for him, and blessed him 
with the benediction of a father. And the 
father of the youth said, " I shall be grieved 
if my son should depart with you." And 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TIRECHAN. 379 

Patrick said, " It shall not be so, but I will 
commend him to Bronus, the son of Icnus, 
and to Olcanus /" he stretched forth his hand, 
and pointed out to him a place near, in which 
are his bones, and marked it with his finger, 
and placed a cross there. 

And two girls came to Patrick, and took 
the veil at his hand, and he blessed for them 
the place at the wood of Fochloth. And 
behold, Patrick went up to the land, which is 
called Foirrgea, of the sons of Amolngid, to 
divide it among the sons of Amolngid, and he 
built there a church, of moist earth squared, 
because wood was not at hand. 

And they brought to him a* sick woman, 
having an infant in her womb, and he baptized 
the child in its mother womb, with the water 
of baptism, ipsa est aqua communis mulieris f 
and they buried her in at the head of the 
church, and upon the grave is the seat of the 
Saint, in the church, even to the present day. 
And he built a certain church at Ross, among 
the family of Caitru, on an island of a bay 
of the sea. 

And he returned to the river Muiade Denec- 
trige, in Bertrigran, and he erected there a 



380 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

stone of the shape of the cross of Christ, and 
said, " Behold ! here shall be found water in 
the latter days, and it shall be inhabited by 
me." And he founded a church near the 
mound of Rigbairt, and he came to Muirisc- 
sain, to Bronus, the son of Icnus, and blessed 
his son, Mace Rime, afterwards the bishop, and 
he wrote rules for him and Muircthaco, the 
bishop, who was at the river Bratho. 

And Patrick and Bronus, came to the shore 
of Authnili, into the territories of Icnus, and 
with them Ercce, the son of Dregin, at the plain 
that is Ros Drenige, in which place is the 
cottage of Bronus, and sitting there a tooth of 
Patrick fell out, and he gave the tooth to 
Bronus for a relic* 

And he said, behold the sea lays before us, 
from this place, and ye will return by the river 
Slidchce^ to the wood." 

And he departed across the mountain of the 
sons of AileUus, and he founded churches there, 
Taemnach, and Ethenach, and Cell Angle, and 
CellSenchuce. 



* A tooth is still preserved in a silver and brass case at 
Cong, in the county of Mayo. + Sligo. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TIRECHAN. 381 

And he departed to the country of Cal- 
brigi Tremaige, and founded a church near 
Druimleas, and baptized many, and erected 
and founded a church on the plain of Ailmaige, 
that is, Domnach Ailmaige, because Patrick 
remained there three days and three nights. 

And he proceeded to the plain of Aim, and 
built a church there, and returned to Evoi, and 
to the plain of Cetni. 

He cursed the river, which is called Niger 
Drobaicum; because it afforded sport to the 
anglers, and they refused to give any fish to 
the Saint. But he blessed another river, which 
formerly had no fish. 

And he cursed other rivers, that is, the river 
Oingce, and Saele, because two of his boys 
were drowned in them ; this was done in com- 
memoration of their virtue. 

He also came to the plain of Sereth, across 
the river, between Esrttaid and the sea, and 
founded the church of Hirraith argi ; and he 
pitched his camp in the plain of Sereth. He 
found there a certain good man, of the race of 
Laithron, and baptized him and his infant son 
with him, who was called Hinu, or Ineus, be 



382 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

cause his father placed him in the church on 
the hill where he was born, on the road coin- 
ing down from the mountain with his father ; 
and he baptized the man's son, and Wrote 
him a primer, and blessed him with the bene- 
diction of a bishop, who afterwards kept Saint 
Assicus with his monks in Ard Roissen, that is 
Hirrath Congi, in the plain of Sereth, in the 
time of the kings Fergussus and Fothuid. 

And he founded a church in the plain of 
Latrain, and the great church Sier Drommo, 
which the family of Dairinise possessed, in 
Doburbwr. He advanced to Farburnas, of the 
sons of Conill, in the plain of Itho, and having 
founded there a great church, he departed to 
the plain of Fochuir, and erected a • church 
there. In that place a certain bishop came 
to him of the race of Corcutheisne, from the 
cell of Tochy in the country of Temenrigi 
Iceru, opposite the setting sun, with one sister, 
and became a monk of Patrick, and their place 
is with the family of Clono, and the men of 
that place lamented. 

Patrick passed the Shannon three times, and 
completed seven years in the western quarter, 
and came from the plain of Tochuir, to Dulo 
Ocheni, and founded seven churches there. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — TIRECHAN. 383 

And he came to Ardstrath, and ordained Mace 
Ercce, a bishop. He departed to Ardd 
Eolorgg, and Ailgi, and Lee Benndrigi, and 
crossed the river Bandce, and he blessed the 
place in which is the cell of Cuill Raithin, in 
Eilniu, in which there was a bishop, and he 
formed other cells in Eilniu, and proceeded 
through the river Breas, and stopped in Duin 
Sebuirgi, on the rock, which is called Patrick's 
rock to this day. He ordained there Saint 
Olcanus, a bishop, whom Patrick brought up, 
and gave him a part of the reliques of Peter 
and Pau^ and of other apostles, and the cloth 
which kept the reliques, and returned to the 
plain of Elmi, . and he founded many other 
churches, which the Coindiri possess. 

He ascended the mountain of Miss, where, 
when in slavery, he had educated Gosacht, 
the son of Milcon Maccuboin, and his two 
sisters, but taught them secretly, under the 
injunction of an oath, for fear of the magi- 
cian. But one night the magician Miluicc 
saw sparks of fire from the mouth of the 
foolish Succetus, ascending to the lips of his 
son, and the whole body of his son was in- 
flamed, and from the mouth of his son, it com- 
municated to that of his sisters. " Why," 



384 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

says he, " O slave ! have you done this evil to 
my son ?" 

Succetus replied, " Sir, what did you see ?" 
he answered, " The mouth of my son filled 
with fire, and my son filled the lips of my 
daughters, and they were all consumed to 
ashes, and their ashes enlivened many, and the 
fire issued from their mouths in flakes like the 
flight of birds, and could not be restrained. 

Succetus answered, u Truly, they could not 
avoid that extraordinary magical appearance, 
because I put into their mouths the words of 
my supreme God." And he departed to the 
mountain Scirte, to the place of the rock, on 
which he saw an angel of God standing, and 
the print of his foot remains almost to this day. 
When he was ascending into heaven, with his 
feet extended from one mountain to another, 
he said, " Behold ! thy ship is prepared, arise 
and walk." And the Saint came through 
Doim, into the country of Tuirtri, to Patrick's 
hill,* and baptized the sons of Tuirtri. 

Having left Mac ha, he came to Maugdorrne, 

* Armagh. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TIRECHAN. 385 

and ordained Victorious, a bishop of Machia, 
and founded there a great church ; and he pro- 
ceeded to Loigaire and Conallj the sons of 
Neill. 

But having completed his rounds, he de- 
parted, and built a church for Just anus, near to 
Bile Tortin, which belongs to the family of 
Ardbreccain, and built another at Hitortena, 
in the east, where the people of Othig Cerpani 
were always free. 

And he proceeded to the territories of the 
Leinsterians to Druimm Hurchaille, and built 
there a house for martyrs, which is so called, 
it is situated on the great road in a valley, and 
the rock of Patrick is here by the way side. 
He departed to the plain of Lift, and formed 
there a church, and ordained the boy Auxilius, 
the exorcist of Patrick, and Esernina, and Mac- 
tadeus in the cell of Cuilin. He ordained 
Feccus Albus, at Slepten, and baptized the sons 
of Dunlinge, and proceeded through Belut 
Gabrain, and founded the church of Hirroigniu 
Martorthige, and baptized the sons of Nioth 
Truich Iternnmice, at the rock of Hicoithrigi 
Hicassuif. 

add 



386 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

These are the three prayers of Patrick, as 
they were delivered to us by the Hibernians, 
entreating that all should be received on the 
day of judgment, if we should repent even in 
the last days of our life. 

1. That he should not be shut up in hell. 

2. That barbarian nations should never have 
the rule over us. 

3. That no one shall conquer us, that is the 
Scots, before seven years previous to the 
day of judgment, because seven years 
before the judgment we shall be destroyed 
in the sea, this is the third. 

The age of Patrick, as is recorded to us, is 
computed beneath : 

In his seventh year he was baptised. 

In his tenth year he was captured. 

For four .years he suffered slavery. 

For thirty years he studied. 

For seventy two years he taught. 

Sum total of his age one hundred and twenty. 



In four points Patrick he resembled Moses 
1st. He heard an angel from a bush on fire. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TIRECHAN. 387 

2d. He fasted forty days and forty nights. 
3d. Because he accomplished 120 years in 

this present life 
4th. Where his bones are, no one knows. 

Two enemies for twelve days contended for 
the body of Saint Patrick, and they saw not 
night for that space of time, but the day 
was perpetual, and on the twelfth day they 
came to battle, and the two armies saw the 
body in a couch between them, and ceased 
from fighting. Columb cille, instigated by the 
spirit of the saint, pointed out a burial place 
for Patrick, where he lies, that is to say, in 
Sabul Patricii* that is in the church near the 
sea, (for the eleventh) where is the passage of 
the martyrs, that is the haven of the man 
Columb cille, from Britain, and the passage for 
all the saints of Ireland, on the day of judg- 
ment. 

In the thirteenth year of Theothosius the 
emperor, Patrick the bishop, was sent by bishop 
Celestine, pope of Rome, for the instruction 
of the Irish, which Celestine was the forty- 
second bishop of the apostolical see of the city 
of Rome after Peter. 



* The monastery of Saul. 



388 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

Palladius the bishop, was the first sent, who 
is otherwise called Patrick, and suffered mar- 
tyrdom among the Scots, as the antient saints 
relate. Then the second Patrick was sent 
by an angel of God, named Victor, and by 
pope Celestine, by whose means, all Ireland 
believed, and who baptized almost all the inha- 
bitants. 

Saint Patrick ought to be honoured on four 
accounts by all the monasteries and churches 
through the whole of Ireland ; that is to say, 

I. For the solemnity of his dreams ; he 

should be honoured in the middle of 
spring for three days and three nights 
with feasting, beside meat as a sacrifice, 
as if Patrick himself came during his 
life. 

II. His offering should be offered up on the 
same day. 

III. His hymn should be sung for ever. 

IV. His Irish psalm should be sung for 
ever. 

Thus, all these four should be held in honour 
and considered by his monks, for him who 
founded their church or monastery, and who 
possess a parish and much ground. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH— TIRECHAN. 389 

This breviary of the people ends : — 
Of the name, Of the writings, 

Of the genealogy, Of the industry, 

Of the childhood, Of the curses against 

Of the captivities, sinners, 

Of the virtues, Of the blessings to- 

Of the Christian sla- wards the pious, 

very, Of the age of Patrick, 

all which he did by the assistance of God, 
are here brought together, and collected by 
very learned antients. 



Here begin some Jew things, which were dis- 
covered at a later period, and which shall be 
related in their proper places. They have been 
collected by the curiosity of his successors, and 
by diligence and sanctity, which were excited for 
the honour and praise of God, and for the 
pleasing memory of Saint Patrick, down to the 
present day. 



But, when Patrick, after his holy voyage 
had reached Ireland ; he left Saint Lommanus, 
in the harbour of Boindio, to keep his ship for 
forty days and forty nights, and then remained 
another forty days in obedience to Patrick. 



390 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

Then, according ta the command of his 
master, he went up in his ship even to the ford 
of Trim, against the stream to the gate of 
the tower of Fedilmedus, the son of Ldigaire, 
the Lord directing him. 

But in the morning Foirtchean, the son of 
Fedelmedus, found Lommanus reciting the gos- 
pel, and admiring it, and his doctrine, imme- 
diately believed, and water being convenient 
in that place, he was baptized by Lommanus, 
in the name of Christ — and remained there 
with him until his mother came to seek him. 
She wept in his presence, for she was a 
Briton ; and she believed also, and returned 
to her house, and related to her husband all 
that had happened to her and her son. And 
Fedelmedus, wept at the coming of the priest, 
for his mother was the only daughter of the 
king of the Britons, one Scothnoesa. But, 
Fedelmedus suspected * Lommanus, inquiring 
from him in the British language, td ascertain 
his faith and family. He answered him, " I 
am Lommanus, a Briton, and the Christian 
foster-child of Patrick, the bishop, who was 
sent by the Lord, to baptize the people of the 
Irish, and to convert them to the faith of 
Christ, who sent me hither according to the 
will of God." And forthwith Fedelmedus 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TIRECHAN. 391 

believed, with all his family, and he gave as an 
offering to him and to Saint Patrick, his pos- 
sessions together with his property, and with 
all his offspring. All these he gave as an 
offering to Patrick and Lommanus with Foirt- 
chern his son, even to the day of judgment. 

But he passed over to Fedlinoid, across the 
river Boindeo, and remained in Chin La gen, 
and Lommanus remained with Foirtchean at 
Trim, until Patrick arrived, and built for 
them a church twenty-two years before the 
church of Altimacha was founded. 

The progeny of Lommanus, of the Bri- 
tons, was one son Gollitus. The mother of 
Patrick was related to Lommanus, as were the 
following bishops Hiforgnidius, and Lacnirc- 
nius. 

Broccaid, in Imbluich of the horses, at Ciar 
rige Connact, Broccanus Imbrechmig, among 
the posterity of Dorthim Cnugenoc Hicill 
Dumigluinn in Deisciurt Breg. 

The foregoing is all about Patrick's own 
family, and what relates to his relations, and 
to his grace and baptism, and doctrine, and 
concerning the lands, churches, and all the 



302 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

grants or oblations which he acquired for 
ever. 

But after some time setting out, lie arrived 
in the neighbourhood of Lommanus, with his 
foster-son Foirtchmn, to his brother Broccidius, 
he and his foster-child went to salute his 
brother — and h& commended his holy church 
to Saint Patrick and to Foirtchean, but FoirU 
chean refused to possess the inheritance of his 
father ; for he offered it to God and Patrick, 
until Lommanus said, " You shall not receive 
my blessing unless you receive the government 
of my church/' But after the death of his 
master he held the government for three days, 
until he came to the ford of Trim, and then 
immediately gave it to Cathlaidus, a foreigner. 

These are the ecclesiastical offerings of 
Fedelmedus, the son of Loigaire, to Saint 
Patrick, Lommanus, and Foirtchean, that is, 
the ford of Trim, in the territories of Loigaire 
Brieg, in the country of Loigaire Midi. 



The progeny of Fedelmedus : 

Foirtchernus, his son, father of 
Aod Magnus, father of 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TIRECHAH. 393 

Aod Parvus, father of 
DonaU, father of 
Baitan, father of 
Ossan, father of 
Cummene, father of 
Saran. 
All these were bishops and chiefmen, who ve- 
nerated Saint Patrick and his successors, but 
his plebeian progeny is as under : 

Fergus, the son of Fedelmith, 
Feredach, the son of Fergus, 
Cronan, the son of Feredach, 
Saran, the son of Cronan, 
Failan, the son of Saran, 
Failnad, the son of Failan, 
Forfailed, the son of Failnad, 
Segene, the son of Forfailed, 
Sochnassach, the son of Segene. 



St. Patrick, when ascending to heaven, com* 

manded all the fruits of his labour, arising 

both from baptism and alms, to be brought to the 

apostolic city, which in the Scottish language is 

called Ardmacha; I found it thus stated in 

the books of the Scots. I, that is to say Calvus 

Perennis, wrote this in the sight of Brian, Em- 

e e e 



394 HUSH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

peror of the Scots, and what I wrote he confirmed 
for all kings, with his seal of wax*. 



Colman the bishop, offered his church of 
Cluaincain, in Achud, to Patrick, as a votive 
offering for ever, and he commended him to 
the holy men, the priests Medb, and Sadb. 

The sons of Ttechrach, gave the plain in the 
north, between Gleori and Ferni, with the 
slaves therein, as an offering to Patrick for ever. 

Likewise, the seven sons of Doath, that is, 
Cluain, Findglais, and Insruth, Culcais, Deruth- 
mar, Culcais, and Cennlocho, faithfully made 
offerings to God and Saint Patrick. 

Also, the sons of Conlaid, offered as an 
oblation to God and Saint Patrick for ever, 
eight pondera campi, that is eight heifers of 
the plain, in their inheritance, that is in Ca- 



+ This passage is written in a more modern hand than 
the rest of MS. The Brian Emperor of the Scots there 
mentioned, was Brian BoiroimAe, who, according to the An- 
nals of the Four Masters, was a week at Armagh, in A. D. 
1004, and made an offering of twenty ounces of gold on the 
altar there. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — TIRECHAN. 39* 

chindlea, Odibcarnib, even to the mountain of 
Caimn. 

All these offerings of the kings at Ciarrichi, 
were made to Patrick for ever. 

Saint Patrick foreseeing, through the holy 
spirit, that his congregations in Kerry, were 
much dispersed, that is the bishops Sachellus, 
Brocidius, and Loarnus, and the priests Medb 
and Etnas , he joined them by his blessing ad 
well in the unity of eternal peace, as in one 
ceremony of faith, under the authority of his 
successor in the apostolic chair atAltimacha. 

Bine an, the son of Lugni, the scribe, a priest, 
and also an achorite, was son of the daughter 
of Lugaithin Netach, who gave the inheri- 
tance he was entitled to, on his mother's side, 
in which he founded a church consecrated to 
God, and given as an offering to Patrick. — 
Saint Patrick marked out for him the site with 
his staff, and he then first received the body 
and blood of Christ, and afterwards Binean, 
received from him the step, (of consecration) 
and he blessed him and left him after him in 
his place. 

Patrick coming to the territories of Cabrigi, 



396 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

baptized the son of CairOdr and Caichan, 
when he baptized them the sons of Cairthir 
and Catchall^ offered the fifth part of Caichan 
to God and Patrick, and the king after- 
wards confirmed the gift. These are the 
denominations of the fifth part Coicid, Cai- 
chain, Otha glais, TelcJue, Berich, Abraidne, 
Conricc, Forcuisin, Tuilgos, Disleb, Otha glais, 
Conacolto, Curreirui, and Otha, Crich, Drom- 
moint, Cuglais, Tamlachta, Dublocho, Lag gluts, 
Cugrenlaich, Fotelaront, Timmchell, Ndsanto, 
Casecen, Indacor, Asescumdacor , Ludescert, 
Lenilafur, Conrici nuocht, Nomomne, Condaircu 
mor, Condaircumedoin, Condaircu fidas, Con- 
daircumeil, Condruim, Toidached, La gluts } 
Conrici, Conaclid, Atropert, Flaith, and Aithech 
Insohuile, Itosuch, Iartabuirt, Benthis, Duarb. 

i ■ * 

Patrick afterwards erected houses in Drum- 
daro, i. e. Drumlias, where he left his holy dis- 
ciple Benignus, with seventeen monks. He 
also gave the veil to the learned Lasaringhen, 
who survived Benignus sixty years. 

The following are the rights and privileges 
of Fetho-fi, established two years before the 
death of the two monks of Dromlias, viz. : — 
That none should inherit in Dromlias, but the 
descendants of Fetho-fi, they should be good, 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TIREOHAN. ' 397 

devout, just and moral, and inclined to enter 
among the monks of DromHas, and diligently- 
inclined to observe the works of the people of 
Patrick there. 

Nao and Nai 9 sons of the brother of Patrick, 
and Daall, the son of Heucair, whom Patrick 
left there, gave as an offering Adopart, Teora- 
leth, Indli, Treathir, to Patrick for ever ; and 
Conderc the son of Daall, offered his son to 
Patrick. 

In the morning Teoralethindli, offered three 
and his son Mac Rirrue, and Patrick 



baptized them, and built a church in their in- 
heritance, and Coirpre, with them, offered his 
kingdom to Patrick. 

Erniu goes to Cummin, to Ailigh, and to 
Emiu of Tit Gimmall, and Maine Buachall, 
and Taimnigh; with those three monks there 
went into this country Cutta and Bratha. 

Cummin and Breatan devoted an eighth part 
of their property with their lands both wood 
and plain, their meadows, inclosures, and gar- 
dens. To Cummin > also belonged half (the 
profits of) the doors of the church of these 
inclosures, where gifts were brought, viz.: 



398 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

three ingots (or ounces) of silver, a bar of 
silver, and a collar, three ounces of old gold 
of the dishes of their ancestors, half an ounce 
for their sons, half an ounce for their sheep, 
and they paid half an ounce for old vases. 
The congregation of Cummin agreed that 
Laghagh, son of Maclora, lord of Crimthanne, 
should have the government, the spiritual 
superintendance was in Colman, of the Britons, 
For a cumal of sacred silver was for the 
payment of the eighth of their proportion. 

Patrick and Iserninus were with Germanus, 
in the city of Ohiodra, and Germanus said to 
Iserninus, that he should go to preach in Ire- 
land, he was ready to obey even to whatever 
part he might be sent, except to Ireland. 

Germanus said to Patrick, " Will you be 
obedient ?" Patrick said, " Let it be as you 
wish." Germanus said, " This shall be be- 
tween us, and Iserninus shall not be able to re- 
fuse going to Ireland." 

Patrick came to Ireland, but he sent Iser* 
ninus to another part, but a contrary wind de- 
tained him in the right side of Ireland. 

They went afterwards to convert a people 



BOOK OF ARMAGH TIRECHAN. 399 

of little reputation, named the Criuthrighe, 
(Picts) and then proceeded until they arrived 
at Temchuile, where they left one of their holy 
men. Then to Rathpalaseigh, where they left 
another, and then they proceeded to Latragh- 
do-aradh, in Ibh May, where came to him the 
seven sons of Cathbhoth, to whom they 
preached, and believing they were baptized, 
and they went with them to settle under the 
protection of Enna-Kinsela. Bishop Fizel 
went with them in a boat apart from the rest. 
Afterwards Patrick and the seven sons of 
Dunlang, believed in him. They went to 
Crimthan, son of Enna Kinsela, and he be- 
lieved. 

Some people sinned by falling into neglect 
of Patrick, so that Cathbhadh and Iserninus 
despised them. The sons of Cathbhadh went 
home, and afterwards they went to meet 
Patrick and Crimthan at Sciath Patrick. 

Going from Gabhain Liffey 9 by way of 
Fothart, in this, affair of Enna, they came into 
Leinster; Iserninus and his monks submitted to 
Patrick, and craved forgiveness. Patrick gave 
them to bishop Fiech, and to the sons of Cath- 
bhad, who took possession of a portion of 
the fields of Fothart. 



400 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 




Patrick went from Tara into the territory of 
Leinster, and met with Dubhthaeh, son of Lu- 
ghain, at Donoghmore, who had been requested 
by Enna Kinsela, to leave one of his disciples, 
a Leinster man, a man without reproach, of 
noble family, and free from blemish, and a 
man with but one wife, as a bishop at Lis 
Patrick, Dubhthaeh answered, there is but one 
I can vouch for on all those points, and that 
man is Fiach Finn, the Leinster man, who 
parted from me in Connaught. Whilst they 
were speaking Fiach Finn approached them. 

Dubhthaeh took Fiach Finn, and presented 
him to Patrick, and solicited him to confer on 
him the order of a bishop, which he did ac- 
cordingly, after having baptized him, and set 
him up as chief bishop of Leinster, and he 
gave him a bell, a mitre, a crozier, and a cloak, 
(pallium) and he left with him seven of his 
people. 

Muchade of Inisfail, 

Augustin of Inisbeg, 

Teachain, 

Dermottj 

Naindedh, 

Paul and 

Fedlimith. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — TIRECHAN. 401 

Afterwards he built Domnagh Fiech, and re* 
mained there until sixty of his people died. An 
angel then appeared to Fiech, and said, " You 
should go to the west, thy resurrection will be 
at Coolmoy, a place where deer and swine 
abound, where you should found your 
churches." 

Fiech replied, " I shall obey Patrick, if he 
commands I shall go, if not, I shall refuse." 
After Patrick went to Fiech and absolved him, 
and blessed him and his holy companions. 
Crimthan gave that house in Slievard to 
Patrick, who had baptized him, 

Saachnall went to visit Patrick in a chariot, 
and proceeding took him with him, and went 
accompanied by an angel from Ruan to Man- 
chan> and stopping there three nights, went to 
Fiech , to establish and consecrate his church, 
and the angel said, it is given to you, Fiech, 
from Patrick, as thy infirmities are removed. 



AiduSy bishop ofSliebhte, sent his instructions* 




* Instruction, or information, [or collections, evidently 
meaning this book, which had been written at the dictation 
of Aldus, and continued so many centuries afterwards with 
the archbishops of Armagh. 

Fff 



402 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

he had made to Segenius at Armagh, 4 who de- 
sired him to (alter) change the instructions; 
but Aldus said, he dedicated his instruction and 
his people, and his church, to Patrick for ever. 
Aidus left his instruction with Con chad y who 
went to Ardmagh, so that Flan Febla gave him 
his church, and he afterwards died. 

Here end a few things which have been 
written in the Scottish language more accu- 
rately, not because I could not write in Latin, 
but because these stories can be understood 
with difficulty even in their own Scottish 
tongue, but if they were related through the 
Latin language, one would not only be doubt- 
ful with respect to their translation, but ig- 
norant also, of what he was reading, or what 
language he was pronouncing, from the abun- 
dance of Scottish names having no correspond- 
ing signification (in the Latin). 

Scripsi hunc ut librum pulsare conetur 
Omnis quicumque legerit ut evadere poena 
Ad caelum valeam et ad summi preemia regni 
Patricio dominum pulsante habitare pereevum. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH, 



SUMMARY OF AIDUS. 



Many people have endeavoured to relate to 
me, Aidus, what they had learned from their 
fathers, and from those who were their ser- 
vants, of the story of St. Patrick, which had 
been transmitted to them by their ancestors, 
but on account of the diverse opinions and sus- 
picions of most people, and the great difficulty 
of ascertaining the true narration, they have 
never attained in this matter any certain track 
or path of history. So that, unless I am de- 
ceived, (as according to our proverb, boys 
are brought into the amphitheatre) in this 
deep and dangerous sea of holy narration, the 
mountainous waves of the whirlpools of 
which, impatiently swelling among sharp 
rocks, situated in seas, as yet unknown to all 
but our (heavenly) father, it can scarcely be 
said that I have brought down the narrative, tried 
and used as a child's boat, by the impulse of 
my oar. Yet, that I may not be said to have 
deduced a great deal from a little — I shall 
with reluctance, endeavour to explain, sum- 



404 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

marily and charitably, in obedience to the 
command of your sanctity and authority, these 
few, selected from the many actions of St. 
Patriok, which I have perceived, my knowledge 
being small, my authors doubtful, my memory 
treacherous, and what is the worst of all, the 
common tradition of the country being against 
trie. 

Concerning the birth of Saint Patrick, and 

his first captivity. 

Concerning his journeys and sea voyage 

to the gentiles, and his sufferings among 

the nations ignorant of God. 

Concerning his second capture which he 

suffered for sixty days from hostile men. 

Concerning his reception by his parents 

when they recognized him. 
Concerning his age when going to visit the 
apostolic see, where he wished to learn 
wisdom. 
Concerning his discovery of holy men in 
Gaul, and that, therefore, he went no 
farther. 
Concerning his age when an angel visited 
and directed him to come here. (i. e. to 
Ireland.) 
Concerning his return from the Gauls, and 
the ordination and death of Palladius 
shortly after. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH SUMMARY OF AJDtJS. 405 

Of Patrick's ordination by king Amathus, 
PaUadius, the priest, being deceased. 

Of the gentile king (living) in Temoria, 
when St. Patrick came bringing baptism. 

Of his first journey to this island to ran- 
som himself, before O^Miliuc should 
draw others to the devil. 

Of the death of Milinc, and the saying 
Patrick, concerning his descendants. 

Of the counsel of St. Patrick at Hessitum. 

Of the celebration of the first Easter. 

Of the first oblation made in Easter in 
this island. 

Of the heathen festival in Temoria on the 
same night on which St. Patrick cele- 
brated Easter. 

Of the going of king Loigaire from Te- 
moria to Patrick, on the night of Easter. 

Of the calling of Patrick to the king, and 
of the faith of Eire, son of Dego, and 
the death of the magician on that night. 

Of the anger of the king and his people 
with Patrick, and of th6 punishment of 
God upon them, and of the transfigura- 
tion* of Patrick before the gentiles. 



* Transfinctione. 



406 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

Of the coming of Patrick on the day of 
Easter to Temoria, and of the faith of 
Dubthach Macculugir. 

Of the conflict of Patrick with the magi- 
cian in that place, and of his own won- 
derful virtues. 

Of the conversion of Loigaire, the king, 
and afterwards of his whole kingdom, 
by the word of St. Patrick. 

Of the doctrine, and baptism, and mira- 
cles of St. Patrick, after the example 
of Christ. 

Of Mae Cmtty and his conversion at the 
sayings of St. Patrick- 

Of the fable of Daire, and of the horse, 
and the oblation of Armagh to Patrick. 

Of the people labouring on the Lord's day, 
contrary to the command of Patriek. 

Of a fruitful land becoming a salt-marsh, 
by the word of St. Patrick. 

Of the death of Monet sen ^ the Saxon. 

Of this, that Saint Patrick saw heaven 
opened, and the Son of God, and his 
angels. 

Of the conflict of St. Patrick against 
Coirthech, king of Aloas. 



These few things concerning the knowledge 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — BOOK OF THE ANGEL. 407 

of St. Patrick and his virtues, Muirchu, the 
son of Cumacthenus, wrote after the dictation 
of Aldus, bishop of the city of Slepten. 



The angel, high priest of the Lord, commu- 
nicated to St. Patrick the bishop, the reverence 
due to his apostolic chair, and the peculiar 
honour of his successors, wisely granted to 
him by God above all the Soots, 



BOOK OF THE ANGEL. 

The book of the angel begins in this manner : 
Therefore, Saint Patrick piously proceeded 
to baptize, teach, and heal a multitude of both 
sexes of the inhabitants of the city of Anpagh, 
at the fountain in the eastern part of the city, 
near Herente. 

And there before day, he awaited many 
from all sides or parts, flocking together at the 
announcement of his preaching the faith— 
suddenly then sleep seized on him, because he 
was previously wearied with nocturnal watch- 
ings for Christ. 



408 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

And behold, an angel suddenly appeared to 
him from heaven, and raised him up from 
sleep — and St. Patrick said, u I am ready, if 
I have lately done any thing wrong in the 
sight of the Most High, to seek pardon from 
God." 

The angel answered, " No — but the highest, 
the Almighty, sent me to you, first for the pre- 
servation of your own soul, and secondly, 
for the conversion of the Irish to him apd the 
faith, by your means, which you have acquired 
through the hardest labour, and under the 
favour of the holy spirit by your preaching, 
which is very clear and profitable to all nations, 
since you were most laborious at all times, in 
many dangers from the gentiles, through cold 
and heat, hunger and thirst, — walking actively 
from nation to nation, for the advantage of 
many. The Lord God, therefore, knows that 
your present situation, which we see placed 
on high, is a cell too narrow and contract- 
ed for the number which inhabit the coun- 
tries, and that your house in the suburbs will 
not suffice for a retreat for all — therefore, a 
very extensive boundary is appointed by the 
Lord, to the city of Altimacha, which you 
have preferred before all the lands of the Irish, 
that is, from the first part of the mountain 



BOOK OF ARMAGH BOOK OF THE ANGEL. 409 

Berbids, even to the mountain Miss — from the 
mountain Miss to Bri Erigi, even to the back 
of Br eg; surely, if you wish it, it shall be of 
this magnitude ; and the Lord God has given 
you all the nations of the Scots, after the man*- 
ner of a parish, and this is your city, which is 
called in the language of the Scots, Armagh." 

Saint Patrick^ having prostrated himself be- 
fore the angel, said, " I give thanks to God, 
my everlasting Lord, who has graciously 
thought his servant worthy to receive such 
great glory." 

The holy man also said, i( My holy Lord, 
I foresee that there will be some chosen by thy 
holy spirit in this island, through the ineffable 
goodness of thy clemency, to be thy preaching 
ofators, dear to me, as if sprung from my own 
body ; friends, also, and devoted servants of 
thine, but who will require some particular 
diocese for themselves, for the purpose of ne- 
cessary attendance in their churches, or monas- 
teries, after me. Therefore, I ought rightly 
and justly to send down, so much of my abun- 
dance, as a gift in common, bestowed by me, 
upon the sincerely religious in Ireland — so 
that both I and they may peacefully enjoy 
the advantage of the goodness of God, the 



410 IRISH AKTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES, 

divine donation having been granted: me for 



purpose. 



>> 



He also says, "whatever Christian men 
may devoutly wish to offer to me from their 
lands and oblations, by their own free will, 
Does not this suffice me ?" 

Likewise, should I not be eontent to be an 
apostolic doctor and chief leader among all 
nations of the Soots, especially since I retain 
a peculiar tribute daily committed to me, and 
even that was given to me from the highest, 
but correctly, due above other free churches 
of the provinces of this island ; \vithout any 
doubt, this right will be decreed to the primate 
of Armagh for ever. 

Let there aljso be a proper reception of the 
archbishop, the successor to the- chair of my 
city, with his companions to the number of 
fifty, besides pilgrims, and those who were 
afflicted with- various complaints, and the un- 
sound persons and othfers, and a fit and proper 
refreshment for each of that number, as well 
in the day time as in the night. 

But in that city of Altimaoha, the religious 
Christians of both sexes, from their first pro- 



BOOK OF ARMAGH BOOK OF THE ANGEL. 411 

fessingi, until they receive the sacrament, should 
dwell separately with their respective orders, 
that is, virgins, penitents, and those observing 
the lawful marriage of the church. 

And to these three orders it is granted to 
hear the word, by preaching, in the church of 
the northern part of the city on Sundays. 

But in the eastern part, in the palace of the 
bishop, both the priests and hermits of the 
church, and other religions persons, offer up 
acceptable praises. 



We will now speak of the special reverence 
of Armagh, and of the honour due to the pri- 
mate of that city. 

That city, indeed, was constituted free and 
the chief by the angel of God, and especially 
granted to that apostolic man, holy Patrick, 
the bishop. 

He presides, therefore, by this privilege, 
over all the churches and monasteries of the 
Scots, even by the highest authority of the 
most exalted prelate, their founder ; who also, 



412 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

ought to be venerated with the honour of the 
chief martyrs, Peter and Paul, Stephen, 
Laurence, and the rest. 

By how much, therefore, the more ought his 
actions to be greatly venerated and honoured 
by all. 

And that we should admire the goodness of 
God in all things, there is preserved in that 
holy place the most sacred blood of Jesus 
Christ, the Redeemer of the human race, in 
the sacred cloth, together with the reliques 
of the saints in the eastern church, where the 
bodies of the pilgrims rest for a long time 
with Patrick, and the bodies of those who 
lived beyond the sea, and of other just men. 

Therefore, it is not lawful, by reason of the 
afore-mentioned authority, that any prelate, 
^bbot, or other person of any of the churches 
of the Scots, should appeal from the decision 
pf him and his successors, for he has the juris- 
diction, if cause should require it, over all the 
bishops and churches of the Scots. 

And that his successors ought to rule over 
every free church and city, seems to be estab- 
lished according to the episcopal degree, in 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — BOOK OF THE ANGEL. 413 

all the island of the Scots, and in every place 
which is called the Lord's, by the clemency 
of the Almighty, according to the words of 
the angel, as the special society of holy 
Patrick the bishop, and the successor of his 
church of Armagh, because the Lord gave 
him the whole island as we have before men- 
tioned. 

* We ought also to know, that a monk of 
any church,, if he should return to Patrick, 
ought not to deny his monkish vow, especially 
if he should devote himself by the consent of 
the abbot, his superior. 

Therefore, he is not to be censured nor ex- 
communicated, whoever shall have come to 
his church for the sake of the love of Patrick, 
because he will judge all the Scots on the great 
day of awful judgment in the presence of Christ. 



Item — Of the honour of the primate of Ar- 
magh, the bishop presiding in the chair, the 
chief shepherd. 

* The meaning of this seems to be, that a monk leaving 
his own monastery to transfer himself to Armagh, shall be 
allowed to do so, but is not thereby released from his vows. 



414 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

• 

If he, the before-mentioned bishop, shall 
come in the evening, to the place in which he 
was to be received, let him be supplied, for 
one turn, with a refection, worthy his rank, for 
himself, and also for his followers, to the num- 
ber of one hundred, with food for them and 
their beasts of burden, beside the guests and 
the infirm, and those boys who carry incense 
during church service, and others, as well lay 
persons as others. 

Likewise he who will not receive the before 
mentioned prelate with the said hospitality, 
and open his house to him ; let him be com- 
pelled to supply, in like manner, seven gar- 
ments,* and to seven years penance. 

Also, whoever shall despise or spoil the holy 
ensigns of the same Agii, that is, those of 
Patrick, shall pay double the damage. 

But, if from the contempt of others, any 
one shall rescue the church property, let him 
receive duas ancettas, from the consecrated 
property of the said primate Patrick. 

Also, whoever in like manner, through de- 

* Ancellas. 



BOOK OF ARMAGH BOOK OF THE ANGEL. 415 

ceit, injury, or wickedness, shall have com- 
mitted any evil against his family or parish, 
or shall have despised the before-mentioned 
emblems ; the whole shall be brought to trial 
before and under the jurisdiction of the same 
prelate of Armagh, who shall properly decide, 
the other judges being passed over* 

Likewise, if a cause shall have arisen so 
difficult, and above the capability of the 
judges, it ought properly to be referred to the 
chair of the archbishop of the Scots, that is, 
Patrick, and for the examination of this 
prelate. 

But, if in such a case, it cannot be decided 
by the wise men, we decree that such a cause 
before mentioned, shall be transmitted to the 
apostolic chair, that is, to the chair of autho- 
rity of the apostle Peter, at the city of Rome. 

Those are the persons who have decreed 
thus — that is, Auxilius, Patrick, Secundinus, 
and Benignus. After the death of St. Patrick, 
his disciples compiled and wrote his works. 

The foundation of his address on each Sun- 
day in Altimacha, at the tomb of the martyrs, 



416 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

and at his return from them, that is, " O Lord, 
I have called unto thee even to the end." 

Between Saint Patrick, of the Irish, and 
Bridget and Columba, a friendship of love took 
place, so great, that they had but one heart and 
design — by their means much good was ac^ 
complished for the cause of Christ. 

The holy man, therefore, says to the Chris- 
tian virgin, " O my Bridget, your parish, in 
your province shall be considered your king- 
dom, in the eastern and western part, your 
authority shall be supported by me." 



BOOK OF ARMAGH. 



THE CONFESSION OF ST. PATRICK, 

OR HIS EPISTLE TO THE IRISH. 

I, Patrick, a sinner, the rudest, the least, 
and the most insignificant of the faithful, had 
Calpkurnius, a deacon, for my father, who was 
the son of Potitus, heretofore a priest, the son 
of Gdissits, who lived in the village of Bana- 
vem Tabernuz. For he had a little farm ad- 
jacent, where I was captured. I was then 
almost sixteen yeaars of age ; hut I knew not 
God, and was led into captivity hy the Irish, 
with many thousand men, as we deserved, 
because we estranged ourselves from God, and 
did not keep his laws, and were disobedient to 
our pastors, who admonished us with respect 
to our salvation : and the Lord brought down 
upon us the anger of his spirit, and dispersed 
us amongst many nations, even to the extre- 
mity of the earth, where my meanness was 
coZpiouous -.p. foreigners, and where 

the Lord discovered to me a sense of my un- 

Hhh 



418 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

belief; that late I should remember my trans- 
gressions, and that I should be converted with 
my whole heart to the Lord my God, who 
had respect to my humiliation, and pitied my 
youth and ignorance, even before I knew him, 
and before I was wise, or could distinguish 
between right and wrong, and strengthened 
me, and cherished me, as a father would a 
son. 

From which time I could not remain silent, 
nor, indeed, did he cease to bless me with 
many acts of kindness ; and so great was the 
favor he thought me worthy, in the land of 
my captivity : for this is my retribution, that, 
after my rebuking, punishment, and acknow- 
ledgement of God, I should exalt him, and 
confess his wonderful acts before every nation 
which is under the whole heaven ; because 
there is no other God, nor ever was before, 
nor will be after him, except God, the unbe- 
gotten Father, without beginning, from whom 
is every beginning, possessing all things (as 
we have said), and his Son Jesus Christ, whom 
we bear witness was always with the Father, 
before the formation of the world, in spirit 
(or spiritually) with the Father, inexpressibly 
begotten before all beginning, through whom 
visible things were made, he became man, 



BOOK OF ARMAGH PATRICK^ CONFESSION. 419 

having overcome death, and was received 
into heaven. And God has given to him all 
power " above every name, as well of the in- 
habitants of heaven, as of the earth, and pow- 
ers below, that every tongue should confess, 
that Jesus Christ is Lord and God," whom 
we believe, and whose coming we expect, as 
presently about to be judge of the living and 
dead, who will render unto every man accord- 
ing to his actions, and has poured upon us, 
abundantly, the gift of his Holy Spirit, and, 
the pledge of immortality ; who makes us, 
who believe, and are obedient, to be the sons 
of God, and joint-heirs of Christ, whom we 
believe and adore, one God in the trinity of 
the sacred name. For he spoke by the pro- 
phet, " Call upon me in the day of tribulation, 
and I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify 
me." And again, he says, " It is an honourable 
thing to reveal and confess the works of God" 

Although in many points I am imperfect, I 
wish that my condition (or nature) should be 
known by my brethren and kindred, that they 
may be able to digest the desire of my life. 
I am not ignorant of the testimony of my 
Lord, who declares in the Psalm, " Thou 
shalt destroy those who speak lies ;" — and again, 
" The mouth which lieth shall lose its life" — 



420 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

And the same Lord, " For every idle word 
which men shall utter, for that shall they render 
an account in the day of judgment" Oft which 
account, I ought with fear and trembling to 
dread this sentence on that day, when no one 
can withdraw or hide himself — but we are all 
together to render an account, even of our 
slightest errors before the judgment^seat of 
the Lord Christ. 

Wherefore, I formerly thought to write, 
but hesitated until now. For I feared, least I 
should fall into the censure of men, because I 
did not learn as others, who being taught in 
the best manner, therefore rightly, both drank 
in sacred learning, and never changed their 
language from childhood, but rather constantly 
added to its perfection. For my language 
and speech is translated into a foreign tongue, 
as can be easily observed from the homeliness 
of my style of writing; (ex saliva scriptures 
mece) like as I was taught and instructed in 
sermons, because the wise man says, " by the 
tongue is distinguished both seme and science, 
and the doctrine of truth" But what avails 
an excuse, although true, especially with pre- 
sumption ? So far as I, myself, only desire in 
my old age, to confirm what I before took a 
survey of, and what I did not consider as 



book ov armagii— Patrick's confession. 421 

being sins which beset me in my youth. — 
But if any one will believe me, and if I shall 
say (what I have before declared) when a 
young man, nay, almost a beardless boy, I 
was captured, before I knew what to seek, or 
whatJE ought to avoid. From whieh cause 
I blush to-day, and greatly dread to expose 
my ignorance, because I cannot explain with 
brevity and precision, as the spirit rejoices, 
and the influenced mind and disposition point 
out. But if, therefore, it were given to me as 
even to the rest — nevertheless, I would not be 
silent on account of the consequences, al- 
though, perhaps, it appears to some, that I have 
in this matter proposed, what I am unable from 
ignorance and difficulty of language to do 
justice to. But it is written, " Lisping tongues 
shall quickly learn to speak peace"— By how 
much the more ought we to seek for salvation 
in the gospel of Christ, even to the extremity 
of the earth. Although not eloquent, but 
confirmed and very strong, and written in 
your hearts, " Not with ink, but with the Spirit 
of the living God" And again the Spirit testi- 
fies, " And his dwelling place was formed from 
on high" 



From whence I, the first rustic deserter, un- 
learned indeed, who knew not how to provide 



i— « ■ »» » i 



422 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

for the time to come, but this I know most 
surely, because, as I was before humiliated, I 
was like a stone, which lies in the deep mud, 
and he who is powerful came, and, in his mercy 
raised me up, and indeed again delivered me, 
and fixed me in his place, and from thence I 
ought boldly to cry out, and to return thanks 
also to the Lord — for his so great benefits, 
here and for ever, which the mind of man 
cannot properly estimate. From which cause 
do you, great and small, wonder,' and ye on 
the Lord's day, ye who fear God,- hear with 
eloquence, and search diligently ; he who 
aroused me, a fool, from the midst of those 
who appear to be wise, and skilled in the law, 
and powerful in language, and in every re- 
spect ; and even me, hated by this world, he 
has inspired above the rest — if I would be so — 
so that with fear and reverence, and without 
complaint, I should faithfully serve that 
nation, to whom the love of Christ trans- 
ferred me, and gave me in my life, if I shall 
be worthy. Finally, that I should with humi- 
lity and truth, be serviceable to them. In the 
measure, therefore, of the faith of the Trinity, 
it behoves me to point out, without fear of 
danger, and to make known the gift of God, 
and his eternal consolation ; to unfold every 
where with confidence the name of God — 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — PATRICK'S CONFESSION. 423 

that also, after my death I should leave to my 
Gallic brethren, and to my children, whom I 
baptized in the Lord — so many thousand 
men. And I was not worthy, nor such, as 
that the Lord should grant this to his servant 
after afflictions and such calamities, after 
my captivity for many years, that he should 
give me so great favour amongst that nation, 
which formerly in my youth I never hoped 
or expected. 

But when I came to Ireland, I was daily 
employed in feeding cattle, and oftentimes 
during the day prayed, and the love and fear 
of God more and more inflamed me, and my 
faith, and my spirit increased, so that in one 
day I have made a hundred prayers, and 
in the night nearly an equal number.* So I 
also remained in the woods and mountains, 
and rose up before day to pray, in snow, in 
frost, in rain, and felt no injury ; nor was 
there any slothfulness in me, as I now perceive, 
because then the spirit was ardent and warm 
within me. 

And then, indeed, on a certain night, I heard 

* This passage looks like an interpolation ; it is incon- 
sistent with the spirit of the rest of the confession. 



424 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

in my sleep, a voice saying to me, " You fmat 
well — you will quickly go to your country" And 
again, after a very short interval, I heard an 
answer addressed to me, " Behold your ship « 
ready ^ bat it was not near, tart was, perhaps, 
two hundred males off — and I had never been 
there, nor did I know any of the inhabitants 
thereof. And after a while, I turned myself 
to flight, and left a man with whom I had been 
six years. And I came in the strength of the 
Lord, who directed my way aright, and feared 
nothing until I -emme to the abip ; and on the 
day on which I arrived, the ship was to Bail 
from her place, and I said., that I would sail 
with them. And the proposal displeased the 
master ef the vessel — <and he answered sharply 
witih this reply, " You shaM by no means come 
with us" And when I heard this, I separated 
myself from Vbem, to go to a cottage, where I 
had been entertained, and on my way I began 
to pray, and 'before I finished my prayer-, I 
heard one uf them loudly catting after me, 
" Come quickly , for those men call you*" And 
forthwith I returned to them, and they began 
to say to me, " Come, because we receive you 
on account of your faith — ratify friendship with 
us in what manner you wish" And therefore 
I ceased to fly, because of the fear of God ; 
but nevertheless J had hopes from them, that 



BOOK OF ARMAGH PATRICK'S CONFESSION. 425 

they would say, that I should come in the 
faith of Jesus Christ, because they were gen- 
tiles. 

And on this account I succeeded with them 
— and after three days we landed, and for 
twenty eight days we journeyed through a 
desart, and food failed, and hunger prevailed 
over them. And the master began to say to 
me, " Christian, do you not say your God is great 
and all-powerful ? Why then can you not pray 
for w, for tee are in danger of famishing ? 
for it is difficult for us to see any man" For I 
plainly told them, €€ Be ye converted from your 
religion, to the Lord my God, to whom nothing 
is impossible, that he may send you food on your 
road, even until ye be satisfied, because he has 
every where abundance" And with God's as- 
sistance it was so done. Behold a herd of 
gwine appeared in our road before our eyes ; 
and they slew many of them, and remained 
there two nights well recruited. And their 
dogs also were satisfied, for many of them had 
been left on the road half dead. And after 
these things they gave the greatest thanks to 
God, and I glorified him before their eyes. 
They also found wild-honey, and offered me 
some. And one of them said, " It is a sacri- 

• • 

1 1 1 



426 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

fice, thank God." From thence I tasted no- 
thing. But on the same night, I was asleep, 
and Satan strongly tempted me, which I shall 
remember as long as I shall be in this body. 
And he fell upon me like a huge rock, but 
hurt none of my limbs. But how it suggested 
itself to me in the spirit to call Helta (1 know 
not.) Meanwhile I saw the sun rise in the hea- 
vens, and while I was exclaiming Helta, with 
all my strength — lo ! the splendour of the sun 
fell upon me, and immediately released me 
from the oppressive weight. And I believe 
that I was assisted by my Lord Christ, and 
that his Spirit called out for me ; and I hope 
that it will be thus in the day of my adversity 
— as the Lord says in the Gospel, u It is not 
you which speak, but the Holy Spirit which 
speaks in you" 

After some years, I again suffered captivity : 
the first night after which I heard a divine 
communication, " For two months thou shalt 
remain with them" which so came to pass. — 
On the sixtieth night the Lord delivered me 
out of their hands ; he also provided for us 
food, and fire and dry weather on our journey 
every day ; until the tenth day, when we all 
arrived as I have above mentioned. We per- 



BOOK OF ARMAGH PATRICK S CONFESSION. 427 

formed the journey through the desert in 
twenty-eight days, and on the night on which 
we all arrived, we had no food. 

And again, after a few years I was among 
the Britons with my parents, who received me 
as their son, and intreated me to promise, that 
I would never again depart from them after 
the many misfortunes I had suffered. And 
there indeed, in the midst of the night, I saw 
a man, as if coming from Hibernia, whose 
name was Victoricius, with innumerable letters, 
and he gave me one of them, and I read the 
beginning of the letter, containing the cry of 
the Scots, vox Hyberionacum. And whilst I 
was perusing the commencement of the letter, 
I thought in my mind that I heard the voice 
of those who were near the wood of Focluti, 
which is near the western Sea, and they thus 
cried out, €€ JVe intreat thee holy youth, to come 
and walk amongst us." And I was very much 
pricked to the heart, and could read no more : 
and I then awoke. 

God be praised, that after so many years, 
the Lord performed to them according to their 
intreaty. And on another night, I know not, 
God knows, whether in me, or beside me, 
with words very skillful, which I heard, but 



428 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

could not understand, unless at the latter part 
of the discourse he thus spoke, u He who gate 
thee life, (or his spirit) the same is before 4hee, 
who speaks in thee." And I then awoke joy- 
fully. And again I perceived him praying 
in me, and he was as if- within my body ; and 
I heard, that is, over the interior man, and 
there he strongly prayed with groans. And 
in the midst of this, 1 was astonished), and 
wondered, and reflected who it could be that 
prayed within me. But at the end of the 
prayer he thus spoke — it may be the Spirit. 
And then I rose up and remembered the apos- 
tle saying, " The Spirit assists the weakness of 
our prayers, for we know not what to ask for 
as we ought, but the Spirit himself prays for us 
with groans not to be uttered ;" which cannot 
be expressed in words — and again — " The 
Lord our intercessor prays for as." 

I saw in a vision of the night : it was Writ- 
ten over against my face without honour. 
And during these transactions I heard to com- 
munication saying to me, " Male audivimus 
faciem designati nudato nomine?" nor 'did he 
thus express it—" You have badly seenf -but 
" We have badly seen" As if he had there 
joined himself — as if he had said, " He who 
touches you is as one who touches the pupii of 



v 



BOOK OF ARMAGH — PATRICK'S CONFESSION. 429 

my eye" I therefore give thanks to him who 
has comforted me under all circumstances, 
that he would not hinder me from taking the 
journey on which I had resolved, and fcon- 
oerning that my work which I had had learn- 
ed from my Lord Christ. Bat from this I the 
more perceived my courage not small, and my 
fidelity was proved before God and man. — - 
From which I boldly say, my conscience does 
not blame tne here eten for the future. 

I call God to witness, that I have not lied 
in the statements Which I have related to you. 

It were tedious to recount all toy labftuvs 
singly, or in parts. I «hall briefly state that 
God often rescued me from slavery, and 
treat of the twelve dangers by which my life 
was in jeopardy, besides many Snares, and 
occurrences* which I cfcnnfct express in *words, 
nfcr shall 1 do injury to my readers— but I have 
a Creator who keew all things, evfefc before 
they were done. 



\ 

% 



Because f am very greatly debtor to 
who gave me .so much favour— that many 
people were bom again to God thitough me, 
and tia&t 4be energy ewery where «faovflkl be 
ordained for this people, lately <comiag to -the 



430 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

belief (or faith) — because the Lord took them 
(or me) from the extremity of the earth, as he 
formerly promised through the prophets — 
" As our fathers falsely prepared idols, and 
there is no use in them — nations shall come to 
thee from the ends of the earth." 

And again, " I have placed thee for a light 
to the nations, that thou mayest be for salvation 
to the ends of the earth;" and there I will 
await his promise, who never deceived, as he 
promises in the gospel — " They shall come from 
the East and from the West, and from the 
North and from the South, and shall sit down 
with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob" So we 
trust, believers will come from all parts of the 
world. 

It therefore behoves us to fish well and di- 
ligently, as the Lord advises and teaches, 
saying, " Follow me, and I will make you be- 
come fishers of men " And again, "Lot I 
send forth fishers, and many hunters, saith the 
Lord, fyc" — from which cause it very much 
behoves us to spread our net, so that a nume- 
rous multitude and crowd should be taken for 
the Lord, and that there should every where 
be clergy, who should baptize and exhort the 
poor and needy, as the Lord in the gospel 



BOOK OF ARMAGH PATRICK'S CONFESSION. 431 

enjoins, and teaches, saying, "Proceeding 
now, therefore, teach all nations, baptizing them 
in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and 
of the Holy Ghost, even to the end of the world" 
And again, " Going, therefore, into all the 
world, preach the gospel to every creature — Tie 
who shall believe and be baptized, shall be saved; 
but he who will not believe shall be damned" 
Whence is it that in Ireland, those who never 
had the knowledge of a God, but worshipped 
even filthy idols ; how have they lately be- 
come the Lord's people, and are called the 
sons of God ? The sons and daughters of the 
Scots, seems to be monks and virgins of 
Christ.* 

Behold, I call God to witness against my 
life — that I have not lied, neither had I any 
occasion to do so to you — nor do I expect 
honour from any of you. For that honour is 
sufficient for me, which he promised who does 
not lie. But I see that I am now in this pre- 
sent time exalted beyond measure by the 
Lord — and I was not worthy, nor such as that 
he shouldaccomplish this for me, whilst I 
know that poverty and misfortune are much 
better for me than riches and pleasures ; for 



-*te- 



* This last sentence evidently interpolated. 






432 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

even the Lord Christ for our sakes became 
poor. 

Bat I should be wretched and unhappy, 
even to wish for wealth ; now I have it not, 
nor do I judge myself because I daily con* 
team the risk of either massacre, or to be in- 
trapped, or to be reduced to slavery, or the 
want of any thing. But I pray for those who 
believe and fear God ; whoever shall be worthy 
to read or receive this writing, which Patrick 
the sinner wrote in Ireland ; that no one should 
ever say that it is my ignorance, if I have 
pointed out any thing weak. But you think, 
and it is verily believed, that it was the gift of 
God. And this is my confession, before I 
shall die*" 



- i" i i i m 



Thti %8 #0 much of the volume which woe 
written by the hand of Patrick himself. On 
the l?th day of March, Patrick was translated 
to heaven* 



THE EPISTLE 

o* 

SAINT PATRICK TO COROTICUS.* 



I, Patrick, a rude and unlearned sinner, 
having been appointed a bishop in Ireland, 
declare most confidently, (or certainly) that I 
have received that mission from God, who is 
my witness:, that dwelling among barbarians 
a Christian and an esrile, urged by my love 
atid 2eal for God, and the truth of Christ ; 
I wished, although rudely, and? in an un- 
polished manner, to declare these things from 
my mouth. For the Itove of my neighbours, 
and my children in the Lord, . roused me and 
compelled me to give up my country and 
parents, and even my life also, if I should be 
thought worthy . F vowed tcr GbdP to* teach* the 
truth to the nations. I have written with thy 
own hand these wordis to Coroticus, to be* de- 
livered to him by the soldiers. Although I 
am despised by those to whom I have written, 



*" This is translated from Sir James Ware, who collated 
his copy with the Cotton and Salisbury MSS; 

Kkk 



434 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

I do not say to my fellow-citizens, nor to the 
pious (or holy) Roman citizens, but to the 
citizens of devils ; apostates, who, on account 
of their evil works, and hostile acts, in the 
works of death, are fit companions of the 
the apostate Scots apd Picts, sanguinary men, 
who have been ever ready to shed the blood 
of the innocent Christians, whom jn numbers I 
brought to God, and confirmed to Christ, on 
on the following day, on which the unction of 
the neophyte, in a white garment, burned 
before them, they were by them cruelly 
slaughtered and butchered with the sword. 
— And they mocked my messenger when I 
wrote them a letter by a holy priest, whom I 
have taught from infancy, with some clergy, 
that they should grant us some part of the 
bpoty of the baptized captives they had 
taken ; therefore, I know not whom I should 
rather grieve for, whether those who were 
slain, those they took captive, or those whom 
the devil grievously ensnared into the ever* 
lasting pains of hell, where they shall rer 
main — because he who caused their sin is a 
slave, and is called the sop of the devil. 

Wherefore, let every man, who fears God 
l^now, that they are estranged from me, and 
from my Lewd Christ, on whose mission I am 



Patrick's £p!stle to corot rets. 435 

now employed, who are patricides, ravenous 
wolves, " Devouring the Lord's people, like 
bread," as he says : " The ungodly have 
broken thy law, O Lord !" wherefore, in the 
latter times Ireland has been benignly and 
kindly planted and instructed, under the fa- 
vour of God. I do not dsurp any thing— 
I have a part with those whoifc he has call- 
ed and pre-ordained to preach his gospel, 
under no small persecutions, eveji to the far- 
thest limits of the earth. Although the en£- 
fny has acted inviduously toward me, through 
the tyranny of Coroticus, who fears not God, 
(nor his priests, whom he has chosen, and to 
them he has committed the Superlative, divine, 
Sublime power, " that whomsoever they should 
bind on earth, should be bound in heaven.")* 
Whence, therefore, (I beseech you) let norte 
of you who are saints and humble in heart, 
suffer yourselves to be flattered by such pei*- 
sons, nor take meat or drink with them, nor 
receive alms from them, until they atone to 
God for the tears which they have cruelly 
caused to be shed by us, and shall liberate the 
servants of God, and the baptized hand- 
maidens of Christ, for whom he died and was 
crucified — " The Most Highest rejects the of- 

* This is evidently an interpolated sentence, 



436 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

ferings of the unjust, who offers a sacrifice from 
the substance of the poor, like one who offers 
his son as a victim in the sight of his father" 
" Riches," says he, " which the unjust mem 
shall collect, shall be ejected from his belly / the 
angel af death drags him off. He shall be 
punished with the anger of dragons, and the 
tongue of the snake shall destroy him" Inex- 
tinguishable fire also shall eat him up. And, 
therefore, " Woe to them who fill themselves with 
tilings which are not their own" — or, " What 
avails it a man to gain the whole world, and lose 
his own soul?" 

It were a long task to discuss, or wind 
through each circumstance, to bring down tes- 
timonies from the whole law against such cu- 
pidity. Avarice is a mortal crime, " Thou 
shalt not covet thy neighbour's goods" " Thou 
shalt do no murder." A homicide cannot be 
with Christ — " He who hates his brother, is a 
murderer j" or, "He who does not love his 
brother, remaineth in death" How much the 
more guilty is he who defiled his hands in the 
blood of the sons of God, whom he has lately 
acquired in the uttermost parts of the earth, 
through our humble exhortations. 

Whether did I come to Ireland without 



Patrick's epistle to xjoroticus. 437 

God, or according to flesh ? Who compelled 
me ; bound [by the spirit, that I should leave 
all my kindred ? Whether do I exercise 
pious mercy towards that nation which for- 
merly took me captive, and destroyed the 
servants and maids of the house of my father? 
I was of the patrician order (ingenuus) ac- 
cording to the flesh, my father being 1 a Decu- 
rion {or captain of ten). For I gave up my 
nobility ; I do not blush for it, nor am I 
grieved, for I did so for the advantage of 
others. Finally, I am a servant in Christ 
Jesus, our Lord; although my own do not 
acknowledge me. " A prophet has no ho- 
nour in his own country" We are not of 
the same fold, nor have we one God and 
Father ; as he says, " He who is not with me, 
is against me, and he who gathereth not with me 
scatter eth abroad" Is it not said, " One man 
destroys, another builds up" I seek not for 
myself — nor my own advantage; but fpr God ; 
indeed, I have in my heart solicitude, to be one 
of the hunters or fishermen, whom God re- 
vealed should appear in the latter days. I 
am envied ; what shall I do, O Lord ? I am 
greatly despised. Behold, thy sheep are torn 
and destroyed by these robbers, at the instiga- 
tion of Coroticus, who has with hostile mind 
(the betrayer of Christians is far from the 



438 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

love of God) delivered them into the hands 
of the Scots and Picts. The ravening wolves 
have destroyed the flock of the Lord, which 
was successfully increasing in Ireland by the 
, greatest diligence ; the sons of the Scots and 
the daughters of the kings, who were monks 
and virgins of Christ — I cannot enumerate 
them. Wherefore, €€ The oppression of the 
just is not pleasing to God, and who respects the 
estate of the lowest." 

Which of the saints would not feel horror 
at the idea of associating with, or joining in 
the banquets of such wretches as these? 
From the spoils of the dead Christians they 
have filled their houses ; they live on rapine. 
The wretched creatures know not the mischief, 
they extend the deadly poison to their friends 
and children ; as Eve understood not, that she 
delivered a deadly offering to her husband ; 
so are all they who act badly, they make death 
an everlasting punishment. 

It is the custom of the Roman and Gallic 
Christians to send pious persons to the Franks, 
and other nations, with many thousand shillings 
for the redemption of baptized captives. You 
have so often slain them, and sold them to a 
foreign nation which knows not God ; you 



Patrick's epistle to coroticus. 439 

deliver up the members of Christ, as if to the 
wolves. What kind of hope have you in 
God ? or who agrees with you ? Or who ap- 
plies to you the words of flattery ? God will 
judge, for it is written ; " Not only those com- 
mitting evil, but those who consent to it also shall 
be condemned" I know not what I should 
say, or speak more concerning the deceased of 
the sons God, whom the sword has cruelly 
exterminated ; for it is written, " Weep with 
those that weep ;" and again, " If one member 
grieve, let all the members grieve with it." 

Wherefore the church deplores and mourns 
her sons and daughters, whom the sword has 
not yet slain, but are carried off and trans- 
ported to a distant country, where sin is mani- 
festly grievous, and shamelessly abounds. — 
There the free-born Christians are sold, and 
reduced to slavery, among the most unworthy, 
the most abandoned, and apostate Picts. — 
Therefore with sadness and grief will I ex- 
claim. — O most excellent and loving brethren, 
$nd sons whom I have begotten in Christ, I 
cannot mention what I can do for you ! I am 
not worthy to assist you with God's assistance 
nor with that of man. The iniquity of the 
unjust has prevailed against us. We are be- 
come like foreigners — perhaps they do not 



440 IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCH EST. 

believe " We partake of one baptist* with fhem" 
or, ** that we hate one God and Father .•" it is 
an indignity to them that we at& born in Ire- 
land, as He 9ays, " Have ye not one God ?" 
" Why do ye forsake each owe his neighbour ?" 
I therefore grieve for ye, I lament for ye. Oh ! 
most <£ea* to me. But again I rejoice within 
myself, that I have not laboured in vain, or 
that my journey has not been unavailing, and 
that it has laid hold of a crime so ftorrible, and 
unutterable. Thanks to< God, yewhfe believed 
and are baptized, have withdrawn from the 
things of the world, ye are beginning (I per- 
ceive) to journey towards paradise, •"* Where 
there shall be neither night, nor grief, nor death 
amy more. But ye shall exult Wee young buffis 
unbound from chains , and shall trample on the 
unjust, and they shall be like dust beneath your 
feet" Ye shall- reign then with the apostles 
and' prophets, and' martyrs, and shall receive 
the everlasting kingdom: as he testifies,, "They 
shall come" (says he) " from the east, and from 
the west, and shall 'sit down with Abraham and 
Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven :" but? 
cruel men, and magicians* and homicides, 
liars, and perjurers, shall have their part in the 
lake of eternal fire ; not without justice does 
the apostle say, " Where the just man wilt 
with difficulty be saved, where shall the sinner, 



Patrick's epistle to coroticus. 441 

and impious transgressor of the law, betake 
himself ?" Wherefore in what place shall 
Coroticus with his most abandoned rebels 
against Christ, see themselves, when rewards 
are distributed (amongst weak women who 
have been baptized) on account of this wretch- 
ed temporal kingdom, shall it not pass away 
in a moment like a cloud, or smoke which is 
dispersed by the wind ? So guilty sinners 
shall perish before the face of the Lord ; but 
the just shall feast in great constancy with 
Christ, they shall judge the nations, and rule 
over unjust kings, for ever, and ever — Amen. 

I testify before God and his angels, that it 

shall be so, as he intimated to my ignorance ; 

these are not my words, but those of God 

and the apostles, and of the prophets (which 

I have transcribed from the Latin) who never 

lied. " He who will believe and is baptized, 

shall be saved, but he who will not believe, shall 

be condemned" God here spoke. I earnestly 

beseech you, whichever of you be a servant 

of God, that he be ready to be a bearer of this 

letter, that he be drawn away by nobody, but 

that rather he should read it in the presence of 

all the people, and before Coroticus himself. 

But if God inspires them, so that at length, 

they may repent and turn to God, and those 

l11 



442 IRISH A/9TIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 

homicides, though late, may repent them of 
their sins, which they have so impiously com- 
mitted against the Lord's brethren, and that 
they may liberate the baptized captive women, 
whom they formerly took, so that they may 
deserve from God to live, and that they may 
be made whole here and for ever. The peace 
of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost, remain with you. — Amen. 



APPENDIX. 



LIBER ARDMACH^E. 






The Latin is given verbatim, and without points, as in the original. 



VITA S. PATRICIL 



fiibi in Hibemica servitute posito antequam essent dixerat eum crebris 
visionibus visitavit dicens _ei adesse tempus ut venire t et evangelico rete 
nationes feras et barbaras ad quas docendas miserat ilium Deusut piscarei 
ibique ei dictum est in visione vocant et filii et fifia? silvae Foclisiee &c. 

Oportuno ergo tempore imperante comitante divino auxilio cceptum 
ingreditur itur ad opus in quod ollim preparatus fuerat utique evan- 
guelii et missit Germanus seniorem cum illo hoc est Segitium presby- 
terum ut testem comitem habere t quia nee adhuc a sancto domino Ger- 
mano in pontificali gradu ordinatus est. 

Certe enim erit quod Paladius Archdiaconus Paps Celestinas urbis 
Rome Episcopi qui tunc tenebat sedem apostolicum quadragensimus 
quintus a Sancto Petro apostolo ille Palladius ordinatus et missus fu- 
erat ad hanc insolam sub brumali rigore positam convertendum sed pro- 
hibuit ilium quia nemo potest accipere quicquam de terra nisi datum ei 
fuerit de coelo nam neque hii feri et inmites homines facile reciperunt 
doctrinam ejus neque et ipse voluit transegere tempus in terra non sua. 
Sed reversus ad eum qui missit ilium revertere vero eo hinc et in primo 
mari transito coepto qui erat parum itinere in Britonum finibus vita 
factus. 

a ' 



11 APPENDIX* 

Audita itaque morte Sancti Palladii in Britannis quia discipuli PaHadii 
id est Augustinuset Benedictus et ceteri redeuntes retulerant in Ebmoria 
de morte ejus. 

Patricius et qui cum eo erant declinaverunf iter ad quendam mirabi- 
lem hominem summum episcopum Amatho rege nomine in propinquo 
loco habitantem ibique Sanctus Patricius sciens quae eventura erant ibi 
episcopalem gradum ab Matho rege sancto episcopo accepit etiam Auxi- 
lius Iserninusque et ceteri inferioris gradus eodem die quo Sanctus 
Patricius ordinatus est. 

Turn acceptis benedictionibus perfectis omnibus secundum morem 
cantato etiam Patricio quasi specialiter et convenienter hoc psalmistae 
vorsu. Tu es sacerdos in ssternnm secundum ordinem Melchisidec. 

Yenerabilis viator paratum navim in nomine sanctae trinitatis ascen- 
dit et pervenit Britannias. 

£t omissis omnibus ambulandi anfractibus prater commone vise offi- 
cium nemo enim dissidie quoerit dominum cum omni velocitate flatu que 
prospero mare nostrum contendit. 

In illis autem diebus quibus haec gestarunt in pradictis regionibus 
fuit rex quidam magnus ferox gentilisque imperator barbarorum regnans 
in Temoria qui erat caput Scotorum Loigaire nomine filius Neill origo 
stirpis regies hujus pene insolae hie autem scivos et magos et aurispices et 
incantatores et omnis males artis inventores habuerat qui poterant omnia 
scire et providere ex more gentilitatis et idolatrie antequam essent equr- 
bus hii duo prae ceteris pneferebantur quorum nomina heec sunt Lothroch 
qui etiam Lochrii et Lucamael qui et Ronal et hii duo ex sua arte magica 
crebriis prophetabant morem quendam exterum futurum in modum regni 
cum ignota quadam doctrina molesta lonquinquo trans maria advectum 
a paucis dictatum a multis susceptum : 

ab omnib usque honoratum 

regna subversurum 

resistantes turbas seducturum 

omnes eorum deos distructurum 

et in ceteris omnibus illorum artis opibus in secula regnaturum. 

Portantem quoque suadentemque hanc morem signaverunt et propho- 



LIBER ARDMACH£1 YITA S. PATRICII. Ill 

taverunt hiis verbis quasi in modum crebro ab hiisdem dictis maxime ia 
aatecedentibus adventun Patriciique duobus aut iribus annis. 

fiaec autem sunt versiculi verba pro linguae idiomo non tarn manifesta 
est adveniet. 

Lasciciput cum suo ligno curvi capite ex sua domu capite perforata 
incantabit nefas a sua raensa ex anteriore parte domus suae respondebit ei 
sua familia tota fiat fiat quod nostris verbis potest mamfestius expri- 
mi. Quando haec omnia fiant regnuni nostrum quod est gentile non 
stabit quod sic potest ea evenerat eversis enim in adventu Patricii idu- 
lorum culturis fides Christi catholica nam replevit omnia. 

Do Lis ista sufficiant redeamus ad propositum. 

Consummato igitur navigio sancto prsefectaque bonerata navis sancti 
cum transmarinis mirabilibus spiritalibus qua? tessauris quasi in opportu- 
num portem in regiones Coolennorum in portum apud nos clarum qui 
vocatur hostium Dee dilata est ubi vissum est ei nihil perfectius esse quara 
ui semetipsum primitus redemeret et inde appetens sinistrales fines ad 
ilium hominem gentilera Milooin apud quern quondam in captivitate fuerat 
portansque geminum servitutis pretiuni terrenum utique et coeleste ut de 
captivitate Uberaret ilium cui ante captivus servient ad anteriorem in- 
solam quam ejus nomine usque hodie nominatur prurim navis convertit. 

Turn deinde Brega Coaalneas qua? fines necnon et fines Ulathorum in 
JLevo dimittens ad extremum fretum quod est Brent seimmisset et discen- 
derunt in terrain ad hostium Slain ille et qui cum eo erant in navi et ab- 
sconderunt naviculum et venierunt aliquantulum in regionem ut requies- 
cerent ibi. £t invenit eos porcinarios cujusdam viri natura boni licet 
gentilis cui nomen erat Dichu habitans ibi ubi nunc est orreutn Patricii 
nomine cognominatum. 

Porcinarius autem putans eos fures ac iatrones «xivit et ihdicavit do* 
mino suo Dudichoin. 

£t induxit ilium super eos ignorantibus illis qui corde proposuerat 
occidere eos sed videns facie m Sancti Patricii convertit domiaus ad 
bonum cogitationes ejus et praedicavit Patricius fidem ille et ibi credidit 
Patricio et requiescit ibi sanctus apud ilium non multis diebus sed volens 
cito ire ut visitaret pnedictum homineai Milconi et portaret ei pretium 



IV APPENDIX. 

suum et Tel sicttt converieret ad Christi ftdem relicta ibi navis apod 
Dicoin coepit per terras diregere viara in regiones Grwdns no r um donee 
pervenit ad montem Mis de quo monte multo ante tempore quo ibi capti- 
ons erat servierat presso vestigio in petra alteri montis ezpedito gradu 
vidit anguelum Victoricum in conspectu ejus ascendisse in caelum. 

Audiens aatem MiUuc servum swim iternm ad visitandnm earn nt mo- 
rem qnam nolebat in fine vitas faceret quasi per vim ne servo snbjectus 
fteret et ille sibi dominaret instinctn diabuli sponte se igni tradidit et in 
domn in qua prius habitaverat rex congregate ad se orani instmmento 
substantia suae incensus est. 

Stans autem Sanctus Patricius in predicto loco a latere dextero montis 
Mis ubi primum illam regionem in qua servivit cum tali gratia adveniens 
vidit ubi nunc usque crux habetur in signum advissum primum ill i us re- 
gionis illico sub oculis rogum regis in incensum intuitus. 

Stupefactus igitur ad hoc opus duabus aut tribus fere horis nullum 
verbum proferens suspirans et gemens lacrimansque atque hssc verba 
proment ait nescio Dens scit hie homo rex qui seipsum igni tradidit ne 
crederet in fine vitas suss et ne serviret Deo asterno nescio Dens scit 
nemo de filiis ejus sedebit rex super sedem regni ejus a generatione in 
generationem insuper et semen ejus serviet in sempiternum. 

Et his dictis orans et armans se signo crucis convertit cito iter suum 
ad regiones Ulothorum per eadem vestigia quibus venerat et rursum 
pervenit in campum Into ad Dichoin ibique mansit diebus multis et cir- 
cum ut totum campum et elegit et amavit et coepit fides crescere ibi. 

Ad propinquavit autem Pasca in diebus illis quod Pasca primum Deo 
in nostra iEgipto hujus insolas vel ut quondam in Gencsseon celebratum est 
et invenierunt consilium ubi hoc primum Pasca in gentibus ad quas missit 
ilium Deus ceiebrarent multis quas super hac re consiliis jectis postremo 
inspirato divinitus Sancto Patricio vissum est hanc magnam Domini re- 
sollempnitatem quasi caput omnium sollempnitatum in campo maximo ubi 
erat regnum maximum nationum harum quod erat omnis gentilitatis et 
idolatries ne possit ulterius iiberari uti hie invictus cuneus in caput totius 
idolatiiae re possit ulterius adversus Christi fidem insurgere sub malleo 
fortis operis cum fide juncti Sancti Patricii et suorum manibus spiritalibus 
primus inlideretur et sic factum est. 



LtBER ARDMACHiE VITA S. PATRICII. V 

£levata igiiur navis ad mare et demisso in tide plena et pace bono illo 
Tiro JDichu migrantes de campo Iniss dextraque manu demittentes omnia 
ad plenitudinem ministerii que erant ante non incongrue leva in portum 
hostii Colpdi bene et prospere delati sunt. 

Relictaque ibi navi pedestri itinere veniernnt in prediction maxi- 
ma m campum donee postremo ad vespernm pervenierunt ad Ferti viro- 
ram Feec qua* ut tabulae ferunt Fodorem viri hoc est servi Feccol Fer- 
chcrtni qui fuerat unus enovim magis prophetis Bregg. Fixoque ibi 
tentorio debeta Pascae vota sacrificiumque laudia cum omni devotione 
Sanctus Patricius cum suis Deo altissimo secundum prophets vocera re- 
didit. 

Contigit vero in illo anno idolatries sollempnitatem quam gentiles in 
cantationibus niultis et magicis inventiooibus nonnullis aliis idolatries 
superstitionibus congregatis etiam regibus satrapis ducibus principibns 
et optimatibus populi insuper et magis in cantatoribus auruspicibus et 
omnis artis omnisque doni inventoribus doctoribus ut vocatis ad Loi- 
geurum vel ut quondam ad Nebvchdonossor regem in Temoria istorum Ba- 
bylonce exercere consuerant eadem nocte qua Sanctus Patricius Pasca illi 
illam adorarent exercecentque festivitatem gentilem. 

£rat quoque quidam mos apud illas per edictum omnibus intimatus 
ut quicunque in cunctis regionibus sive procul sive juxta in ilia nocte 
incendisset ignem antequam in domu regia id est in palatio TemorUe sue- 
cenderetur periret anima ejus de populo suo. 

Sanctus ergo Patricius Sanctam Pasca celebrans incendit divinum 
ignem valde lucidum et benedictum qui in nocte refulgens a cunctis pene 
plani campi habitantibus vissus est. 

Accidit ergo ut a Temoria videretur vissoque eo conspexerunt omnes 
et mirati sunt convocatus qui senioribus majoribus natu regi nesciisse 
ilium qui hoc feceret magi responderunt rex in sternum vive. Hie ignis 
quern videmus quique in hac nocte accensus est antequam succenderetur 
in domu sua id est in palatio Temorue nisi distinctus fuerit in nocte hac 
qua accensus est numquam extinguitur in aeternum insuper et omnes ignes 
nostra? consuitudinis super graditur et ille qui incendit et regnum 
super veniens a quo incensus nocte in hac superabit nos omnes et te et 
omnes homines regni tui seducet et cadent ei omnia xegna et ipsum im- 
plebit omnia et regnabit in sajcula ssculorum. 



VI APPENDIX* 

His ergo auditis turbatus est rex Loigaire valde ut ollim Erodis et 
omnia civitas Temoria cum eo et respondent dixit non sic erit sed nunc nos 
ibimus ut videamus exitum rei et retinebimus et occidemus facientes tan- 
tum nefas in nostrum regnum. . 

Junctis ter novam curribus secundum deorum traditionem et as- 
sumptis his duobis magis et conflictionem per omnibus optimis id est 
Lucetmail et Lockru in fine noctis illius perrexit Loigaire de Temoria ad 
Ferti virorum Feec hontinum et equorum facies secundum congruum iilis 
sensum ad levam vertentes* 

Enntibus autem illis dixerunt magi regi rex nee tu ibis ad locum in 
quo ignis est ne forte tu postea adoraveris ilium qui incendit sed eris foris 
juxta et vocabitur ad te ille ut te adoraverit et tu ipse dominatus fueris 
et sermocinabimur ad invicem nos et ille in conspectu tuo rex et pro- 
babis nos sic et respondens rex ait bonum consilium invenistis sic faciam 
ut locuti fuistis. 

Et pervenierunt ad praefinitum locum. Discendentibusque illis de 
curribus suis et equis non intraverunt in circuitum loci incensi sed sede- 
runt juxta. 

Et vocatus est Sanctus Patricius ad re gem juxta extra locum incensi 
dixeruntque magi ad suos nee surgemus nos in adventu isttus nam qui- 
cunque surrexerit ad adventum istius credet ei postea et adorabit eum. 
Surgens denique Sanctus Patricius et videns multos curfus et equos eo- 
rum hunc que Psalmists versiculum non incongrue in labiis et in corde 
decantans. Hii in curribus et hii in equis nos autem in nomine Dei 
■ostri ambulabimus* * * * * ad illos illi non surrexeiunt in ad- 
ventu ejus sed unus tamen a Domino adjutus qui noluit obedire dictis 
magorum hoc est Erce filius Dego cujus nunc reliquiae adorantur in ilia 
civitate que vocatur SUuxe. Surrexit et benedixit eum Patricius et credi- 
dit Dee BBterno. 

Incipientibusque illis sermocinari ad invicem alter magus nomine Locru 
procax erit in conspectu Sancti audens detrachere fidei Catholic® tumu- 
lentis verbis. Hunc autem intuens turvo oculo talia promentem Sanctus 
Patricius ut quondam Pttrus de Simone cum quadam potentia et magno 
clamore confidenter ?d Domiuum dixit Domine qui omnia potes et in tua 
potestate consistunt quique me missisti hue hie impius qui blasphemat 
nomen tuum etevatur nunc foras et cito raoriatur. Et his dictis elevatus est 



LIBER ARDMACHJB — VITA S. PATRICII. VII 

in fethera magus et iterum dimissus foras desuper verso ad lapidem cerebro 
comminutus et mortuus fuerat coram eis et timaerunt gentiles. 

Iratusque cum suis rex Patricio super hoc voluit eum occidere et 
dixit injecite manus in istum perdentem nos. Tunc videns gentiles im- 
pios inruituros in eum Sanctus Patricius surrexit claraque voce dixit 
Exsurgat Deus et dissipentur inimice ejus et fugant qui oderunt eum 
a facie ejus et statim inruerunt tenebne et commotio quaedam horribilis 
et expugnaverunt impii semetipsos alter ad vers us alterum insurgens et 
terra motus magnus factus est et collocavit axes curruum eorum et age- 
bat eos cum vi et procipitaverunt se currus et equi per planitiem canipi 
donee ad extremum pauci ex eis semivivi evaserunt ad montem Monduirn 
et prostrati sunt ab hac plaga coram rege ex suis sermonibus ad maledic- 
tum Patricii septem septies viri donee ipse remanserat tamen homini- 
bus ipse et uxor ejus et alii ex Scotis duo et timuerunt valde. 

Veniensque regina ad Patricium dixit ei homo juste et potens ne 
perdas regem veniens enim rex genua flectet et adorabit Dominum 
tuum et venit rex timore coactus et flex it genua coram Sancto et finxit 
se adorare quern nolebat et postquam separaverunt ad invicem paululum 
gradiens vocavit rex Sanctum Patricium simulato verbo volens interficere 
eum quomodo sciens autem Patricius cogitationes regis pessimi benedic- 
tis in nomine Jesu Christi sociis suis octo viris cum puero venit ad regem 
enumerat eos rexvenientes statimque nusquam comparuerunt ab oculis 
regis sed viderunt gentiles octo tarn cervos cum hynulo euntes quasi ad 
dissertum et Rex Loigaire mestus timidus et ignominiosis cum paucis eva- 
dentibus ad Tentorium versus est de luculo. 

Sequent! vero die hoc est in die Pases recumbentibus regibus et 
principibus et magis apud Loigaire festus enim dies maximus apud eos 
erat manducantibus illis et bibentibus vinum in palpatio Tentorial sermo- 
cinantibusque et aliis et aliis cogitantibus de his qua facta fuerant Sanctus 
Patricius quinque tantum viris ut contendere t et verbum faceret de fide 
Sancta in Temoria coram omnibus nationibus hostiis olaussis secundum 
id quod de Christi legitur venit adveniente ergo eo in coenacolum Tento- 
rial nemo de omnibus ad adventum ejus surrexit prater unum tantum id 
est Dubthoch Macculigil poetam optimum apud quern tunc temporis ibi 
erat quidani adolescens poeta nomine Feec qui postea mirabilis episcopus 
fuit cujus reliquiae adorantur in Sleibti. Hie ut dixi Dubthach solus ex 
gentibus in honorem Sancti Patricii surrexit et benedixit ei Sanctus. 
Crediditque primus in ilia die deo et repputatum est ei ad justiciam, 



VIII APPENDIX. 

Vitto itaqu* Patricio vocatus est agentibus ad vescendura ut proba- 
rent eum inventnris rebus ille autem sciens que venture, essent non ref- 
fellet vesct. 

Comantibu* autem omnibus ille magus Lucttmail qui fuerat in hoc* 
terua conflictione etiam in ilia die solicitus est extincto cousocio suo 
eon£ig*re adversus Sanctum Patricium et mt initium cause baberet in- 
tuentibua aliis immissit aliqaid ex vasse suo in poculum Patricii ut pro- 
baret quid faceret. 

Vidensque Sanctus Patricius boo probationis genus videntibus cunctis 
benedixit poculum suum et versus est liquor in modum gelu et converso 
vasse cecidit gutta ilia tantum quam immisserat magus et iterum bene- 
dixit poculum converaus est liquor in naturam et mirati sunt omnes* 

Et post paululum ait magus faciamus signa super hunc campum maxi- 
mum in boc campo maximo respondensque Patricius ait qua* et dixit ma- 
gus inducamus nivem super terram et ait pater nolo contraria voluntati 
deo inducere et dixit magus ego inducam videntibus cunctis tunc in- 
cantationes magicus exorsus induxit nivem super totam campum pertin- 
guentem Fertnn et viderunt omnes et mirati sunt. Et ait Sanctus ecce 
videmus hoc depone nunc et dixit ante istam horam eras non possum de- 
ponere et ait sanctus potes malum et non bonum facere non sic ego tunc 
benedkens per totum circuitum campum dicto citius absque ulla pluia 
aut nebulis aut vento evanuit nix. Exclamaverunt turbae et mirati sunt 
corde. Et paulo post invocatis demonibus induxit magus densissimas 
tenebras super terram in signum et mormuraverunt omnes et ait Sanctus 
expelli tenebras at ille similiter non poterat. Sanctus autem orans bene- 
dixit et reppente expukae sunt tenebne et refulget sol et exclamaverunt 
omnes et gratias egerunt. His autem omnibus in conspectu regis inter 
magum Patriciumque ait Rex ad illos libros vestros in aquam mittite et 
ilium cujus libri in lessi evasserunt adorabimus. Respondit Patricius fa- 
ciam ego et dixit magus nolo ego ad judiciam aqua? venire cum isto 
aquam enim deum habet certe audivit baptisma per aquam a Patricio da- 
tum et respondens rex ait permitte per ignem et ait Patricius prumptus 
sum et magus nolens dixit hie homo versa vice in alternos annos nunc 
aquam nunc ignem deum veneratur et ait Sanctus non sic sed tu ipse ibis 
et uuus ex me is pueris ibi tecum in separatam et conclaussam domum et 
meuni erga te et tuum erga me erit vestimenium et sic simul incende- 
mini et hoc consilium insedit et aedificata est eis domus cujus dimidium ex 
materia viridi et alterum dimidium ex arida facta est et missus est magus 



LIBER ARDMACHiE VITA S. PATRICII. IX 

iu illam domum in partem ejus viridam et unus ex pueris Sancti Patricii 
Bineus nomine cum veste magica in partem domus conclussa itaque ex- 
trinsecus domus coram omni turba incensa est et factum est in ilia hora 
orante Patricio ut consumeret flamma ignis magum cum dimidia domu 
viridi permanente casula Sancti Patricii tarn intacta quia ignis non tetigit. 
Felix autem Beninius e contrario cum dimidia domu arida secundum 
quod de tribus pueris dictum est non tetigit eum ignis neque contristatus 
est nee quicquam molesti intulit casula tarn magi quam erga eum fuerat 
non sine Dei natu exusta et iratus est valde rex adversus Patricium de 
morte magi sui et inruit poenae in eum nolens occidere sed prohibuit 
ilium Deus. Ad precem enim Patricii et ad vocem ejus descendit ira Dei 
in verticem suum et tiniuit rex vehementer, et commotum est cor ejus et 
ononis civitas cum eo. 

Cong re gat is igitur senioribus et omni senatu suo dixit eis rex Loi- 
gaire melius est credere me quam mori initoque consilio ex suorum 
pnecepto credidit in ilia die et convertitur ad dominum Deum Hisrael 
sternum et ibi crediderunt multi alii et ait Sanctus Patricius ad regem 
quia resististi doctrines meae et fuisti scandalum mihi licet prolonguentur 
dieis regni tui null us tamen erit ex semine tuo rex in sternum. 

Sanctus autem Patricius secundum prssceptum domini Jesu gentis 
baptizansque eas in nomine patris et filii et Spiritus Sancti et profectus 
a Temoria predicavit Domino cooperante domino et sermonum confir- 
mante sequentibus signis. 

Erat quidam homo in regionibus Ulothorum Patricii tempore Maccuil 
Macugrecc^B et erat hie homo valde impius saevus tyrannus ut cyclops 
nominaretur cogitantioribus. 



pravus 


verbis 


In tan turn 


verbis 


intemperatus 


vergens im- 


factis 


malignus 


pietatis in 


spiritu 


amarus 


profundum 


anima 


iracondus 


ita ut die 


corpore 


sceleratus 


quadam 


mente 


crudelis 


in montosso 


vita 


gentilis 


aspero alto 


conscientia 


inanis 


qua? sedens 



loco Hindrxdm Maccuechach nbi ille tyrranidem cotidie exercebat Diberca 



X APPENDIX. 

signa tumens nequiwima crodelitatif et tr an sei m te s hoapitet crudeli seelere 
iaterficient. 

Sanctum quoque Patricium claro fidei lumine itodhntem et mirO 
qfcondam coslestis patriae glorte diademata? fulgentem videna euni in con- 
cussa doctrine fiducia per congruum vne iter aaibulantem interficere eogi- 
taret dicens latilitibus tuts ecce seductor file et pervertor hominum venil 
cai mot ffacere prststig iat ut deef pint homines multosqufe sedttcat eamna 
ergo et temptemni eura et sciemns si habet potentiam aliquam ilte Dens 
in quo se glorietur. 

Temptaveruntque virum sanctum in hoc mundo temptaVeruht et pc- 
snernnt linum ex semetipsis sanum in medio eorum sab sago jacehtfcm in- 
firmitatemqne mortis simulantem ut probarent sanctum in bujusque modi 
failacere sanctum seductorem rirtutis prssstrigias et orationes veneficia 
vel incantationes nominantes adveniente Sancto Patricio cum discipulii 
snis gentiles dixerunt ei ecce unns ex nobis nunc infirmitarus est accede 
itaqne et canta super eum aliqnas incantationes setts ttUe si forte sa'narl 
posset. 

Sanctus Patricius sciens omnes dolas et fallacias eorum constanter 
•t intripide ait nee minim si infiimus fuisset et revelantea socii ejus fa- 
ciem in simulantis innrmitatem viderunt eum jam mortuum at iHi obstu- 
pescentes ammirantesque tale miraculum dixefunt intra se gentes vere hie 
homo Dei est male fee imus temptantes eum. 

Sanctus vero Patricius conVersus ad Maccuil ait quare temptare me 
voluiste responditque ille tyrannus crudelis ait posniteat me facta hujut 
et quodcumque perciperis missi faciam et trado me nunc in potentiam 
Dei tui excelsi quern praedicas. Et ait Sanctus crede ergo in Deo meo 
Domino Jesti et coufitere peccata tua et baptizare in nomine Patris et 
filii et Spiritus Sancti. Et converses in ilia hora credidit Deo feterno 
baptizatutque est insuper et nunc addidit Maccuil dicens contiteor tibi 
Sancte domine mi Patrici quia proposui te interfieere judica ergd quan- 
tum debuerit pro tanto ac tali crimine et ait Patricius non possum judi- 
care Bed deus judicabit. 

Tu tunc egredire nunc inermis ad mare et transi yelociter de regione 
hac hibernensi nihil tollens tecum de tua substantia prater vile et parvum 
indumentum quo possit corpus tuum contegi nihil gustans nihil que bibena 
de fructu insolee hujus habens insigne peccati tui in capite tuo et post- 



LIBER ARDMACHjE TITA S, PATRICII. Xi 

quam perveniasad mare conUga pedes iuos conpede ferreo et projece 
clavim ejus in mari et mitte te in navim unius pallia absque gubernaculo 
et absque reroo et quocumque te duzerit ventus et mare esto paratus 
et terram in quamcuuque deferat te divina provideotia inhabita et exerce 
tibi divina mandata. 

Dixitque Maccvil sic feciam ut dixisti divino autem niortuo quid fa- 
ciemus et ait Patricius vivet et exsurget sine dolore et susc'tavit eum 
jPatricius in ilia hora et revixit sanus. 

Et migravit inde Maccuil tarn cito ad mare dexterum campi Init ha- 
betur fiduciae inconcussa fidei collegiantque se in litore jeciens clavim in 
mare secundum quod praeceptum est ei et ascendit mare in navicula et in- 
spirayit illi ventus Aquilo et sustulit eum ad meridiem jecit qui eum in 
insolam Evoniam nomine invenitque ibi duos viros valde mirabilis in fide 
et dpctrina fulgentes qui primi docuerunt verbum Dei et baptismum in 
JtaenMU 

Et cenversi sunt homines insolsB in doctrina eorura ad fidem catholi- 
eam quorum nomina sunt Ccnindri et Rumili. Hii vero videntes virura 
unius habitus mirati sunt et miserti sunt illius elivaverunt qui de mari 
suscipientes cum gaudio ille igitur ubi inventi sunt spiritales patres in 
eegione a Deo sibi credita ad regulam eorum corpus et animum exercuit 
et totum vits tempus exegit apud istos duos sanctos episcopos usque dum 
successor eorum in episcopatu effect us est. 

Hie est Maccml Dimane episcopus et antistes Ardda HutmnonH. 

Alia vero vice Sanctus requieseens Patricius in die dominica supra 
mare juxta salseginem quod est ad aquilonalem plagam a collo Bo vis 
distans non magno vice spatio audivit sonum intemperatum gentilium in 
die dominica laborantium facientium rathi vocatisque illis prohibuit eos 
Patricius ne laborarent in dominica die at illi non consentiebant verbis 
Sancti quin iramo inridentes deludebaut eum et ait Sanctus Patricius 
Mudekrtfh quamvis laberaveritis nee tunc proficiat quod tunc completum 
est in sequenti enim nocte ventus magnus adveniens turbavit mare et 
omnia opera gentilium destruxit tempestas juxta verbum Sancti. 

Fuit quidam homo dives et benorabilis in jegionibus orientalium cut 
nemen erat Jkdwf hunc autem regavit Patricius ut aliquam locum ad ex- 
•ttendum religienem daret ei. 



Xll APPENDIX* 

Dixitque dives ad sanctum quam locum petis peto inquit sanctus ut 
ilium altitudinem terns que nominatur Dorsum Saticis dones mihi et con- 
struam ibi locum. At ille noluit sancto terrain illam dare altam sed dedit 
illi locum alium in inferiori terra ubi nunc est Fertce Martyrum juxta 
Arddmache et habltavit ibi Sanctus Patricius cum suis. 

* Post vero aliquid tempus venit eques Dahi ducens equum suum 
miraculum ut pasceret in herbosso loco Christianorum et offendit Pa- 
tricium talis dilatio equi in locum suum et ait. Stulte fecit Daire bruta 
mittens animal ia turbare locum sanctum quam dedit deo. At vero eques 
tamquam sordus non audiebat et si mutus non aperiens os suum nihil lo- 
quebatur sed dimisso ibi equo nocte ilia exibit. 

Crastino autem die mane veniens eques vissitare equum suum invenit 
eum jam mortuum domique reversus tristis ait ad dominum suum ecce 
christianus ille oecidit equum tuum offendit enim ilium turbatio loci sui 
et dixit Daire occidatur et ille nunc ite et interficite eum. Euntibus 
autem illis foras dictu citius inruit mors super Daire. Et ait uxor ejus 
causa christiani est haec. Eat quis cito et portentur nobis beneficia 
ejus et salvus erit et prohibenter et revocentur qui exierunt occidere 
eum. 

Exieruntque duo viri occidere eum ad christianum qui dixerunt ei 
celantes quod factum est et ecce infirmitatus est Daire portetur illi ali- 
quid a te si forte sanari possit. 

Sanctus autem Patricius sciens quam facta sunt dixit nimirum bene- 
dixitque aquam et dedit eis dictus ite aspergite equum vestrum ex aqua 
ista et portata? ilium vobiscum et fecerunt sic et revixit equus et portave- 
runt secum sanatusque est Daire asparsione aqus sanctae. 

Et venit Daire post h»c ut honoraret Sanctum Patricium portans se- 
cum eneum mirabilem transmarinum metricas ternas capientem dixitque 
Daire ad sanctum ecce his eneus sit tecum et ait Sanctus Patricius Gratza- 
cham re vers usque Daire ad domum suam dixit stultus homo est qui nihil 
boni dixit prater Gratzacham turn pro eneo miribali metritaruro trium 
additque Daire dicens servis suis ite reportate nobis eneum nostrum 
exierunt et dixerunt Patricio portabimus eneum nihilominus et ilia vice 
Sanctus Patricius dixit Gratzacham portate et portraverunt. Interroga- 
vitque Daire socios suos dicens quid dixit Christianus quando reportasti 
aeneum. At ille responderunt Gratzaehum dixit et ille Daire respondent 



LIBER ARDMACHiE VITA S. PATRICII. Xlll 

dixit Gratzacham in dato in ablato ejus dictum tarn bonumest cum Gratia- 
cham illis portabitur illi rursum eneas suus et venit Daire insemet ilia vice 
et portavit aeneam ad Patricium dicens ei fiat tecum aeneus tuus. Constans 
enim et in commotabilis homo es insuper et partem illam agri quam ollim 
petisti do tibi nunc quantum habeo et inhabita ibi et ilia est civitas quae 
nunc Arddmacha nominatur et exierunt anobo Sanctus Patricius et Daire 
ut considerarent mirabiles oblationes et beneplacitum munus et ascen- 
derent Ulam altitudinem terrae invenieruntque cervam cum vitulo suo 
parvo jaciente in loco in quo nunc alt a re est sinistrals ecclesias in 
Arddmachce et voluerunt comites Patricii temere vitulum et occidere sed 
noluit sanctus neque permissit quin potius ipsemet sanctus tenuit vitulum 
portans eum in humeris suis et secuta ilium cerva velut amantissimaque 
ovis usque dum dimisserat vitulum in altero saltu situm ad aquilonalem 
plagam Arddmacha? ubi usque hodie signa qusdam virtutis esse manentia 
periti dicunt. 

Virum aliquem valde durum et tarn avarum in campo Inis habitantem 
iterum stultitie avaritisBque inacurisse crimen periti ferunt ut duo boves 
carrarum Patricii vehentes alio die. Post sanctum laborem in pastu 
agili sui requiescentibus pascentibusque se bobus violenter in constanter 
presente Sancto Patricio van : ille homo per vim coegit. Cui irascens 
Sanctus Patricius cum raaladictione dixit Mudebrod malefecisti nusquam 
proficiat vel ager hie tuus neque semiti tuo in aeternuni. Jam inutilis erit 
et factum est sic inundatio et enim maris tam habunda eodem veniens die 
circumluit et operuit totam agrum et posito est juxta profeta? verbum 
terra fructifera in salsuginem a malitia inhabitants in ea arenossa ergo et 
infructuossa haec a die qua maledixit earn Sanctus Patricius usque in ho- 
diernam diem. 

Finit primus incipit secundus liber. 



De Patricii diligentia orationis. 

De mortuo ad se loquente. 

De inluminatio dominica nocte ut equi inventi sunt. 

De eo quod angelus eum prohibuit ne in nichil moriretur. 

De rubo ardente in qua erat angelus. 

De quatuor Patricii petitionibus. 



XIV AfPENDIX. 

De die mortU f jut et de tempore vit» triginta aaneium. 

De termino contra noctem possitct. 

De caligine duodecem noctium abstersa. 

De vigilis prime noctis juxta corpus Patricii quas angeli fecerunt. 

De consilio sepulture ejus ab angelo. 

De sepulcro igne de sepukh.ro ejus enunpeate. 

De fretto rursum surgente ut non bellum de corpere fieret. 

De felici seductione populomm si quis autem terminum contra noctem et 
noctem npn vissum esse in tota provincia brevi tempore in quo luctus 
Patricii peractus est abnegare infideliter voluit audiat et diligenter 
attendat qualiter Extchus tanguente in horalogi® Achat demonstrate 
sanltatisjudicio. 

DILIGENTIA ORATIONIS. 

Omhes psalmos et ymuos et apocalipsin Johannis et omnia kantica 
•piritualia scripturarum cotidie decantans sive manens aut in itinere per- 
gens tropeo etiam crucis in omni hone dies noctisque eenties se signans et 
ad omnjs cruces quascumque yidisset oxationis gratia de curru deseendens 
declinabit inde etiam in die quadam ingrediens crucem qua) erat juxta 
\iam sit-in non videns pretergressus est. Hanc tunc auriga videt et 
ill! dixit cum ad hospitium quoddam quo tenderat pervenissent et 
orare ante prandium coepissent dixit inquam auriga vidi crucem juxta 
viani per quam venimus positam. At ille Patricius dimisso hospitio per 
ifiam quam venerat ad crucem pergena oravit et sepulchrum ibi vide Fat et 
mprtuum in illo busto sepultum interrogavit qui morte abierat et sub fide 
vixerat res.pon.dit mortuus gentilis vixi et hie sepultus fui. 

Quedam etiam mulier in alia provincia degens mortuum filium qui se 
longui separatus erat habuit ex ilia absente sepultus est at post aliquot 
dies lugens mater omissum filium plunxit et indecreto errore sepulchrum 
gentilis horainis sui filii bustum esse putans crucem non juxta gentilem 
posuit et ob hanc causam ut Patricius dixit crucem non viderat quia se- 
pulture gentilis locis fuit et virtus major inde surrexerat ut mortuus loque- 
retur et qui sub fide defunctus erat Christi scieretur et juxta ilium alme 
cruris fieret meritum signo in vero terming posito. 



Consuetudo autem illi cjrqt x£ a vespera dpminUp noetis usque ad 
secunde ferie Patricks nqn ambulant inde jq quadam dominiea die bonoM 
sacri temporis in campo pernoctans gravis pluia cum {enpestate aecetarat. 
Sed cum gravis pluia in tota patria populate est in loco uti Sanctus epis- 



LIBER ARDMACHiE VITA S. PATRICII. XV 

copus perhOctabat siccitus drat sicut in conca et in vellere Gededh accede- 
rat auriga memorat equos amissos quasi amicos caros planguit quia illos 
quaere re tenebris arceatibus vissum non jpoterat inde pietas Patricii pat r is 
pit mota est et flebili auriga dixit. 

Dens in angusiis in opportunitatibus adjutor prumptUs adjutorium 
prestabit et equos quos ploras invenies ex hinc inanUm spolians manica 
<xtehsara. -Jugulavit elevavit et qui n que digiti sibi luminaria ita proxima 
quoque in luxerat et per lucem extenss manus equos quo9 commisserat 
auriga solito gemitu invenit sed hocmlraculum auriga comes usque ad 
Patricii obitum absconderet. 

Post vero miracula tanta quae alibi scripta sunt et quae bras fideli mun~ 
dtis celebrat ad propinquante die mortis ejus venit ad eum angelus et 
dixit illi de morte sua ideo ad Ardmacha missit qui prae omnibus terris 
delexit ideo mandavit ut venirent ad eum viri multi ad eundem deducen- 
dam quo volnit inde cum coinitibus suis iter corpOre ccepit Ardmachi vo- 
hratarie fellurehi cupitam satis sed jUxta viam rubUs quaedam arserat et 
noa cdmburetnr sicut antea Moses pervenerat ill rubo Victor erat angelus 
qui Patricium saepe vis i tare solebat et Victor alter um anguelum ad Pa- 
tririum prohibendum ne pergat quo pergere cupit missit et dixit illi 
quare profictsceris sine Vicroris consilio quamobretn Victor te vocat et ad 
eum declina et ut ei jttssum «st declinavit et quid facere deberet ihterto- 
gavit et respondit angelus dixerat revertere ad iocam unde venis hoc es\ 
SubvA et data* sunt quatoor peHtiones tiVji quas petis ei. 

Prima petitio Ut in Ar&chhdckte fiat of dmatio tUa. 

Secunda petitio ut quicuraque ymuum qui de to comp'osftus est in die 
ezHus de corjpore cantaverit ru judicabis penitehtiam ejus de suis pec- 
catis. 

Tertia petitio ut nepotes Dickon qui te Bifiigne susciperunt misere- 
cordiam mereantur et non pereant. 

Qtarta petitio ut Hibernebses omnes in dii jtfdicii a te jutticehter sicut 
dicitur ad apostolos. Et vos sedtotates judicabkis duddecim tribubus 
Israel ut eos quibus apostofis fueruht judices iuistis. 

Revettere igftur sicut tibi dico et motions iugfederis viam pairom 
tubruih qubft in die ±n calendis Aprflis fceractus tdtius ejus vil» airai# 



XVI APPENDIX, 

* 

cxx. et provenerat sicut omnibus totius Hiberni® annis celebratur et 
contra noctem terminum pones quia in ilia die mortis ejus nox non erat et 
per duodecimos dies in ilia provincia in qua mortis ejus exequiae peractat 
sunt nox non irruit et fiiscis tellurem non amplexerat alis et pallor non 
tantus erat noctis et astri fortis non induxerat bosferus umbras. £t plebs 
Ulod dixerunt quod usque in finem anni totius in quo abierat nunquam 
noctium tales tenebree erant quales antea fuerant. Quod ad tanti viri 
meritum declarandum esse dubium est vi. Ad propinquante autem hora 
obitus sui sacrificium ab episcopo Tassach sicut illi Victor anguelus dixit 
ad viaticum beate vita? accipiat. 

In prima nocte exequiarnm ejus angueli vigilias salmi corporis fece- 
runt in vigiliarum et psalmorum moribus omnibus quicumque ad vigilias 
in ilia prima nocte veniebant dormientibus homines orantes et psalmos 
cantantes corpus custodierunt. 

Postquam autem in ccelum profecti sunt angueli odorem suavissimum 
quasi mellis et fragrantiam dulcidinis quasi vini dimisserunt ut impleretur 
quod in benedictione beate patriarch® Jacob dictum est. Ecce odor tilii 
mei tamque odor agri pleni quam benedixit Dominus viii. 

Quando autem anguelus ad eum venit consilium sepultune dedit illi 
eleganter duas boves indomiti et pergant quocumque voluerint et ubi 
cum que requiescunt ecclesiae in honorem corpusculi tui edificetur et sicut 
anguelus dixit instabiles electi sunt juvenci et stabili plaustrum gestamine 
humeris impositum esse sancto corpore vechunt et a loco qui Clocher vo- 
catur ab oriente Findubrec de pecoribus Conail electio clarificavit boves et 
exierunt dei natu regente ad Dun leth glaisse ubi sepultus est Patricius et 
dixit ei ne reliquiae a terra reducuntur corporis tui et cubitus de terra 
super corpore fiat quod jussu dei factum in novissimis demonstratum est 
temporibus quia quando ecclesia super corpore facta est fodientes humum 
antropi ignem a sepulcro in rum pe re viderunt et recedentes flammi ge- 
ram timuerunt flam me ignem. 

De reliquis Sancti Patricii in tempore obitus sui dira contensio ad 
belltim usque pervenieus inter nepotes Niell et orientales ex una parte 
inter aliquando propinquales et propinquos nunc inter dirissimos hostes 
irarum intrat certamen secundum fretum quoddam quod Collum Bovis 
vocatur merito Patricii sanguis effunderetur et misericordiae dei altis 
crispantibus quae intumescebant fluctibus et undarum vertices concave 
rumpebant sera et dorsa in fluctibus tremula aliquam crispanti rissu et 



LIBER ARDMACHiE— TflTA S. PATRIC1I. XVII 

aliquando flavis vallibus In certamine ruebat quasi ad cohibendam animo- 
sitatem gentium dirare tales enim popull sunt surrexit freti feritaset 
plebem pugnari prohibuit. Postea autem sepulto Patricio et freti 
tumore sepulto orientales et contra Vita nepotes Neill acriter ad certa- 
men ruunt et ceftatim preparati et armati ad bellum ad locum beat! 
corporis proriiroperat sicut felici seducti sunt fallacia. putantes se dtfoa 
boves et plaustruiri invenire et corpus sanctum fupere estimabunt et cum 
corpore et tali preparata et armatura usque ad fluvium Cabcehna pervCnl- 
erunt et corpus tunc illis non comparuit impossibile enim ut de tanto ac 
de beato corpore pax fieret nisi dei natu taliter videretur vissio ad tern- 
porum distensa ne quod animarum salus innumerab ilium in exitum et 
mortem ut testetur felici fallacia ostensum est sicut Siti antea excscati 
ne sanctam profetam Heleseum occiderent ad Heleseum divina provisione 
ad Samariam usque ducfi sunt hasc etiam seductio ad concordiam populo- 
rum facta est. 

Iterum recurrit oratio anguelus in omni septima die septimane semper 
venire consuerat et sicut homo cum nomine loquitur iter conloquio angu- 
eli fruebatur Patricius etiam in xm anno etatis captus et vi annos servi- 
unt et per xxx vices conductidnem anguelus ad eum venerat et consiliis 
atque conloquiis fruebatur anguelicis antequam de Scotia ad Latinos per- 
geret centies in die et centies in nocte orabat aliquando sues custodiens 
perdidit eas et anguelus veniens ad eum sues indicavit ill! aliquando etiam 
anguelus illi loquens multa illi dixit et postqu^m ill i locutus est pedem 
super pet ram ponens Inscirit in montem Mis coram se ascendit vestigia 
pedes augueli in petra hue usque manentia cernuntur et in illo loco xxx 
vicibus ad eum locutus est et illi locus et ibi fidelium preces fructum feli- 
cissimum obtinerit. 

FINIT AMEN. 

Portavit Patricius per Sinbin secum l clocos l patinos l calices altaria 
libros legis evangelii libros et reliquit illos in locis novis. 

Patricius vi anno baptizatus est xx captus est xii servivit xl legit lii 
docuit tota vero etas ejus cxi. 

Use Constans in Gallis invenit. 

Patricius venit de campo ArtMct ad Drammvt Cerigfet ad Namniu 
Toisdaft ad Mitch Esrachtae et viderunt ilium cum viris viii. aut ix. cum 



VIII APPENDIX. 

Visso itaque Patricio vocatus est agent ibus ad vescendum at proba- 
rent eum inventaris rebus ille autem sciens quae ventura essent non ref- 
fellet vesci. 

CcenantibuB autem omnibus ille magus Lucttmail qui fuerat in hoc* 
terna conflictione etiam in ilia die solicitus est extincto cousocio suo 
eoitiigfMre adversus Sanctum Patricium et at initium cause haberet in- 
tuentibus aliis immissit aliquid ex vasse suo in poculum Patricii ut pro- 
baret quid faceret* 

Vidensque Sanctus Patricius boo probationis genus videntibus cunctis 
benedizit poculum suum et versus est liquor in modum gelu et converso 
vasse cecidit gutta ilia tantum quam immisserat magus et iterum bene- 
dizit poculum conversus est liquor in naturam et mirati sunt omnes* 

£t post paululum ait magus faciamus signa super hunc campum maxi- 
mum in boc campo maximo respondensque Patricius ait quae et dixit ma- 
gus inducamus nivem super terram et ait pater nolo contraria voluntati 
deo inducere et dixit magus ego inducam videntibus cunctis tunc in- 
cantationes magicus exorsus induzit nivem super totam campum pertin- 
guentem Ferenn et viderunt omnes et mirati sunt. £t ait Sanctus ecce 
videmus boc depone nunc et dixit ante istam horam eras non possum de- 
ponere et ait sanctus potes malum et non bonum facere non sic ego tunc 
benedicens per totum circuitum campum dicto citius absque ulla pluia 
aut nebulis aut vento evanuit nix. Exclamaverunt turbae et mirati sunt 
corde. Et piulo post invocatis demonibus induxit magus densissimas 
tenebras super terram in signum et mormuraverunt omnes et ait Sanctus 
expelli tenebras at ille similiter non poterat. Sanctus autem orans bene- 
dixit et reppente expulsa? sunt tenebne et refulget sol et exclamaverunt 
omnes et gratias egerunt. His autem omnibus in conspectu regis inter 
magum Patriciumque ait Rex ad illos libros vestros in aquam mittite et 
ilium cujus libri in lessi evasserunt adorabimus. Respondit Patricius fa- 
ciam ego et dixit magus nolo ego ad judiciam aquas venire cum isto 
aquam enim deum habet certe audivit baptisma per aquam a Patricio da- 
tum et respondens rex ait permitte per ignem et ait Patricius prumptus 
sum et magus nolens dixit bic homo versa vice in alternos annos nunc 
aquam nunc ignem deum veneratur et ait Sanctus non sic sed tu ipse ibis 
et uuus ex meis pueris ibi tecum in separatam et conclaussam domum et 
meum erga te et tuum erga me erit vestiraentum et sic simul incende- 
niini et hoc consilium insedit et SBdificata est eis domus cujus dimidium ex 
materia viridi et alterum dimidium ex arida facta est et missus est magus 



LIBER ARDMACHiE VITA S. PATRICII. XIX 

In xxii anno statis laboris magis relinquere potuit vii aliis annis ambu- 
lavit et navigavit in fluctibus et in campistribus locis et in convallibus 
montanis per Gallias atque I tali am totam at que in insolis quae sunt in mari 
Terreno ut ipse dixit in commemoratione laborura. Erat a u tern in una 
ex insolis quae dicitur Aralanensis annis xxx mihi testante Ultano epis- 
copo. Omnia autem quae evenerunt invenietis in plana illius historia 
scripta. Haec sunt novissima illius mirabilia in ii regui anno Logairi 
mac Neill finita atque feliciter facta. 

A passione autem Christi colleguntur anni ccccxxxvi usque ad mor- 
tem Patricii. 

Duobus autem vel v annis regnavit Loigaire post mortem Patricii. 

Omnis autem regni illius tempus xxxiii ut putamus. 

Venit vero Patricius cum Gailis ad insolas mac Euchor et insola orien- 
tali quae dicitur insola Patricii et secum fuit multitude) episcoporum 
sanctorum et presbyterorum et diaconorum ac exorcistarum hostiario- 
rum lectorumque nee non filiorum quos ordinavit. 

Ascendit autem de mari ad campum Breg sole orto cum benedictione 
dei cum vero sole mire doctrine densas tenebras ignorantie inluminans 
ad Hiberniara ingens Lucifer sanctus episcopus oritur et antifana assiduo 
erat ei de fine ad finem in nomine domini dei patris et filii atque spiritu 
sancti Jesu Christi benigni hoc autem dicitur in Scotica lingua Ochen. 

Primo vero venit ad vallem Sescnani et edificavit ibi ecclesiam primam 
et portavit filium Sesceneum nomine Episcopum secum et reliquit ibi ii 
pueros peregrinos. Vespere vero venit ad hostium Ailbine ad quendam 
virum bonum et babtizavit ilium et iuvenit cum illo filium placitum sibi 
et dedit ill! nomen Benignum quia collegebat pedes Patricii inter manus 
suas et pectus et noluit dor mire apud patrem et nmtreni sed flevit nisi 
cum Patricio dormiret. Mane autem facto cum surgeret completa bene- 
dictione super patrem Benigni Patricius currum conscendit et pedes illius 
di verso alter in curru et alterum super terram erat et Benignus puer 
pedem Patricii tenuit duobus manibus strictis et clamavit sinite te me 
apud Patricium patrem proprium mihi et dixit Patricius baptizate eum 
et elevate eum in currum quia heres regni niei est. Ipse est Benignus 
episcopus successor Patricii in ecclesiae Machsa. 



APPENDIX* 



He epifooporvm nunero quos ordinavit in Hibernia ecccl. 

De pNMbyterit bod poifunus coordinate qntft b*bti*abat cotidie 
bomine* ot illh litteras legebat ac abgatoiias et do alii* opisegpos ac proa-, 
byttros faoiebat quia in etate propria baptismum aceipenrat wbfia. 



DE EPISCOPI8. 



Be ni gnus. 

Bronu*. 

Sachellus. 

Cethiacus. 

Carthacus. 

Cartenus. 

Conuanua. 

Fintranua. 

Biggeus. 

CEternus. 

Sencaticus. 

Olcanus. 

Iborus. 

Ordiui. 

Nazariua. 

Miserneus. 

Senachus. 

Secundinus. 

GQsacJms. 

Camuiacus. 

Auxilius. 

Yictoriqua- 



Bressialius. 

Feccus. 

Menathus. 

Cennannus. 

Nazarua. 

Melus. 

Jkfaceleus. 

Afcctaleus. 

Culeneus. 

Asacus. 

Bitheus. 

Falertus. 

Sescneus. 

Muirehthchus. 

Temoreris qui fuudavit ec- 
clesiam sanctam Caxrce quia 
tenuit familia Clonoaviss. 

Daigneus. 

J us ti anus ftfac Hi| Paimeni. 

Oloacnus. 

Qomnallus et alii quasi pin, 
rimi. 



D£ PREJSBYTERIS. 



Aniciui. 

Brocidius. 

Amergenus. 

Lommanu?. 

Catideus. 



Catqs. 

Catanus. 
Broscus. 
Ailbeua. 
Trianus. 



LIBER ARDMACHJ1— -VITA S. PATRIC1I. XXI 



DE NOMINIBUS EPISCOPORUM FRANCORUM PATRICI1 

EPISCOPI TRES. 



Insppitti. 



Bernicrai* 



Hernicius. 



DE SUBDIACONIS. 



Soman. 

Semen. 

Cancen. 

Berniciusdiaeomiset Ernjcius 

Fraud viri zii. cum aorore 

una aut vi. vel. iii. 
Caasanua. 
Conlung. 
Er clung. 



Broeanua. 
Roddanua. 
Brigson. 

et alter Roddanua qui fun- 
davit oeclosiam Senem ne- 
potem Alello quam tenut- 
runt monachi Patricii Gen. 
gen et Sannuch. 



DE DIACONXS. * 



Piaqenus Ivoatus qui t>apti?« 
avit Cejanum filium artifc- 
cia ex liberis Patricii. 

t>iaconus Coimmanua Carua 
Patricio qui fuit ia aeccle-* 
sia magna Ardlicce. 



Qlcanua monachus qui fuit in 
cellola magna Mumd* pxe*« 
piteri ii. exorcistas scimua 
apud ilium exorcUta Losca 
in dorao Dairi* 



In jregienibua Tuirtri exorcist* alii in canopo Lip hi. De aecclesiis 
quas fundavit in campo Brtg primum in Culmine ii eoclesia* Cera* fa qua 
aepultua eat Jffrcu* qui portavit mertalitatem magnaai iii in cacuminibus 
Aisse iiii in BlaUiniu v in Collumbas in qua ordinavit Eugwium Sanctum 
Episcopum vi fficclesiee filio Laithphi vii Imbridam in qua fuit sanctus 
dttlcia. fraier Cwtkuci viii super Angethar in qua Ktnnaaus episcopus 
quem ordinavit Patricius in primp Pascha Hifferti viroxum Feicc qui 
portavit aecum ignem primum benedictum ac ceriales lucernaa primua 
Patricii de manibua portavU domi ut aacenjderet funwwn benedictum in 
oculoa ac nave* hcunjnum gentilium et regie Lmgairi et magorum UUua. 
quia cQntraverunt illi tres magi fratres ex uno viro nominibus et genera 
Crutk Loch Lethlanii de genera Rimtir qui fecerunt conflictioneni magnaai 
contra Patricium et Ben i gnu m cassula autem magi inflaramata est circa Be* 
nignum et in cinerem finita erat. Sanctus quoque filius sanus effectus est 



XX11 APPENDIX. 

firma fide dei in conspectu regis et hominura et magorum cassula autem 
Benigni filii Patricii infixa est circa magum et inflammatus est magus in 
medio ac consuroptus est et dixit Patricius in hac hora consumpta est 
gentilitas Hibernie tola et elevavit Patiicius manus suas deo circa magum 
Loch Letheum et dixit Domine mi jece a me canem qui oblatrat faciem 
tusm et me eat in mortem et intenderunt omnes magum elevatum per 
tenebras nocturnales poene usque ad caelum sed reversus cadaver illius 
conglutinatum grandinibus et nivibus commixtum scintillis igneis in ter- 
rain ante faciem omnium cecidit et est lapis illius in oris australibus 
orientalibusque usque in presentem diem et conspexi ilium oculis meis. 

Prima feria venit ad TaUenam ubi fit Agon regale ad Coirpriticum 
filium Neill qui voluit eum occidere et flagellavit servos ejus in flumine 
Sele ut indicarent Patricium Coirpritico quapropter appellabat ilium 
patrera inimicum dei et dixit ei semen tuum serviet seminibus fratrum et 
non erit de semine tuo rex in sternum et non erunt pisces magni in flu- 
mine Sele semper. 

Deinde autem venit ad Conallum filium Neill ad domum illius qui 
fundavit in Ipco in quo est hodie ecclesia Patricii magna et suscepit eum 
cum gaudio magno et baptizavit ilium et firmavit solium ejus in aeternum 
et dixit illi semen fratrum tuorum tuo semini serviet in aeternum. £t tu 
missericordiam debes facere heredibus meis post me in saeculum et filii 
tui et filiorum tuorum filiis meis credulis legitimum sempiternum pensabat- 
que aecclesiam deo Patricii pedibus ejus lx pedum et dixit Patricius si di- 
minuatur ecclesia ista non erit longum regnum tibi et firmum. 

Pasca quoque claussa finita prima feria exiit ad vadum MoUb Broon et 
ibi ecclesiam fundavit in qua reliquit iii fratres cum una sorore et haec 
sunt nomina illorum Cathaceus Cathurus Catneus et soror illorum Catnea 
quae emulgebat lac ab dammulis feris ut senes mihi indicaverunt. 

Perrexitque ad civitatem Temro ad Loigarium filium Neill iterum 
quia apud ilium foedus pepigit ut non occideretur in regno illius sed non 
potuit credere dictus nam Neill pater meus non sinivit mihi credere sed 
ut sepeliar in cacuminibus Temro quasi viris consistentibus in bello quia 
utuntur gentiles in sepulcris armati prumptts armis facie ad faciem usque 
ad diem Erdathe apud mngos id est iu diei diem domini. Ego filius Neill 
et filius Dun tinge Immaif/en in campo Liphi produritate odivi ut est 
hoc. 



LIBER ARDMACH£ VITA S. PATRICH. XX111 

Porro fundavit eecclesiam Jcarric Dagri et alteram ecclesiam Immruig 
Thuaithe et scripsit elimenta Cerpano et intravit in domum regiam et non 
surrexerunt ante se nisi unus tantum hoc e.-t Hi reus sacril?^us et dixit 
illi. Cur tu solus surrexUti in honorem dei n ei in me. Et dixit ei 
Hercus ne*cio qui.l video scintillas i^neas de lahiis tuis a.«»cendere in 
labia msa. Sanctus quoque dixit si baplizaris domini accipies quod me 
cum est ra-pondit acciphui et vaniarunt ad fontem Loigles in Scotica no- 
biscum vitulus civitatum. Cumque aperuisset librum aique baptizasset 
virum Hercum audivit viros post tergum suum se inridentes ad invicetn 
de rei illius considerations quia nescierunt quid fecerat et baptizavit tot 
milia hominum in die ilia et intercaeteras baptismatis sententias audivit. 
Ecce ii namque viri nobiles confabulabantur post tergum s'bi et dixit 
alter alteri verum est quod dixisti a circulo anni qua? prsteriit ut ve- 
nisses hue in illis diebus. 

Die mihi nomen tuum quseso et patris tui et agri tui et campi tui et ubi est 
domus tua. Respondeus filius Amolngid sum ego Alius Fechrach filii Echach 
ab occidentalibus plagis de campo Donmon et de silva Fochloth. Cumque 
audiisset patris nomen silva? Fochlothi gavissus est valde et dixit Endeo 
Amolngid h\\o et ego tecum exibo si vivus fuero quia dixit mihi dominus 
exire et dixit Endeus non exibis mecum ne occidamur ad invicem Sanctus 
quoque dixit verum tamen nam quod vivus ad tuam regionem pervenies et 
tu nisi venero tecum et vitam seternam non habebis quia propter me venisti 
hue quasi Joseph ante 61ios Israel. Endeus autem dixit Patricio tu filio 
meo baptismum da quia tener est ego autem et fratres mei non possumus 
tibi credere usque dtim ad nostrum plebem pervenerimus ne inrideant nos. 
Conallus autem babtizatus est et dedit Patricius benedictionem super 
ilium et tenuit manum illius et dedit Cethaco episcopo et nutrivit ilium et 
docuit eum Cethiacus et Mucneus frater Cethiaci episcopi cujus sunt reli- 
quiae in ascclesia magna Patricii in silva Fochlithi propter hoc mandavit 
Conallo insolam suum Cethiacus et generis illius est usque in presentem 
diem quia laicus fuit post mortem Cethichi sancti. 

V enierunt autem filii Amolngid sex ad judicandum ante faciem Loigarii 
et Endeus contra eos unus et filius ejus tener et Patricius ante illos et in- 
terrogaverunt vestigaverunt causam hereditatis illorum et judicavit illis 
Loigaire et Patricius ut dividerent inter se hereditatem in septem partes 
et dixit Endeus nlium meum et partem hereditatis mea? ego immolo deo 
Patricii et Patricio per hoc dicunt alii quia servi sumus Patricii usque in 
presentem diem foedus pepigerunt per manus Loigairi filii Neill Patricius 
•t filii Amolngid cum exercitu laicorum episcopi* sanctorum et inierunt 



XXIV APPENDIX. 

iter facere ad montem Egle et extendit Patricias eti&ffi pfetiam d no decern 
armatorum hominum ut inscrlptlone sua adfirmat de argento et auro ut 
nullum malorum hominum impediret eos in via recta transeuntes totam 
Hiberniam. Quia necessitas poscit illos ut pervenirent silvam Fochlithi 
ante caput anni pasca secunda causa filiorum clamantium ctamofe magho 
noces audivit in utero matkum suarum dicentium veni Sancte Patrici salvos 
nos facere. 

Plantavit ecclesiam super vadum Segi alteram ecclesiam Cinnena 
Sancta super vadum Carnoi Imboind et altera super Coirp Bail he et altera 
super fossam Dall Bronig qnam tenuit episcopus filius Cartin avunculus 
Brigitce Sancte . Fundavitque alteram in campo Echredd alteram in campo 
Taidcni que dicitur Cellbile apud familiam Sorest alteram in campo 
Echnach in qua fuit Cassanus presbyter alteram in Singitibus. Alteram 
in campo Bili juxta vadum Capitis Canis alteram in capite CarmelR in 
campo Tehch in qua Sancta Brigita pallium cepit sttb niairibtrs filii Cattle. 
In Huisniuch Midi manslt juxta Petram Coithrigi sed occisi sunt circa se 
alii perigrini a filio Fechach fifii Neill cui maledixit dicens non erit de stifpe 
tua rex sed servies semini fratrum tuorum. £t alteram ecclesiam in capite 
Airt in regionibus Roide in qua posuit altare lapidetim et alteram fit- 
cuil Corre et venit per flumen Ethne in ii Tetkbias et ordinavit Melton 
episcopum et ecclesiam Bili fundavit et ordinavit Gos actum filiuih Milcon 
mac Cubooin quem nutrivit in servitute septem annorum et mittens Camula- 
cum Commiensium in campum Cuini et digito illi indicavit locum de cacu- 
mine Grancret id est ecclesiam Raithin, 

Et venit in campum Rein et ordinavit Bruscum preshyterum et eccle- 
siam illi fundavit qui dixit mirabile post mortem ejus altero sancto qui 
fuit in insola generis Cotirbi benedictus est triduum filium tuum habe's ego 
autem tedebit me mors mea quia solus sum in ecclesia in deserto in fficcle- 
sia relicta ac vacua et non ofierant juxta me sacerdotes in noctibus som- 
nium faciens est tertio die surrexit sanctus et arripuit anulum et trull am 
ferrumque et sepulcri fossam fodivit et portavit ossa Brusci sancti secum 
ad insolam in qua sunt et restiant. 

Mittens autem Patricius Methbrain ad fossam Slecht barbarum Patricii 
propinquum qui dicebat mirabilia in deo vera. Venitque Patricius ad 
alveum Sinone ad locum in quo mortuus fuit auriga illius Boidmalus et 
sepultus ibi in quo dicitur Call Boidmail usque in hanc diem et immola- 
tus erat Patricio. 



LIBER ARDMACHiE VITA S. PATRICII. XXV 

Finit liber primus in regionibus nepotum Neill peractus. Incipit 
secundus in regionibus Connacht peractus. 



Omnia quae scripsi a principio libri hujus scitis quia in vestris regioni* 
bus gesta sunt nisi de eis pauca que inveni inutilitatem laboris mei a 
senioribus inultis ac ab illo Ultano episcopo Conchubernensi qui nutrivit me 
reiulit sermo. Cor autem meum cogitat in me. De Patricii dilectione 
quia video dissertores et archiclocos et milites Hiberniae quod odio habent ' 
paruchiam Patricii quia substraxerunt ab eo quod ipsius erat tiinent quae 
quam si quaere ret heres Patricii paruchiam illius potest pene totam inso* 
lam sibi reddere in paruchiam quam deus dedit illi. 

I* Totam iasolam cum hominibus per anguelum Domini. 

II. Et legem domini docuit illis. 

III. Et babtismo dei babtizavit illos* 

IV. Et crucem Christi indicavit. 

V. Et resurrectionem ejus nuntiavit sed familiam ejus no A diligunt quia 
non licet jurare contra eum et super eum et de eo. 

VI. Et non lignum licet contra eum mitti quia ipsius sunt omnia primiti© 
scclesiae Hiberniae sed juratur a se omne quod juratur. 

Omnia autem quse scripsi ab initio libri hujus simplicia sunt. Omne 
an tern quod restat strictius erit. 

Venit ergo Patricius sane t us per alveum fluminis Sinne per vadum 
duorum avium in campum Ai. Audientes autem magi Loigairi filii Neill 
omnia qua facta fuerunt Calvus et Capito'anium ii fratres qui nutrierant 
duas filias Loigairi Ethnc Alba Fedelm Nufa timentes Be mores sancti viri 
ace i per en t indignati sunt valde tenebrasque nocturnales ac densas inauri- 
nas super totum campum Ai fecerunt nescimus cujus potestatis hoc fuit 
sed scimus quod nox longua trium dierum totum et noctium erat. Arri- 
puitque sanctus jejunium tribus diebus et tribus noctibus cum centenis ora- 
culis flectenisque assiduis deum regem regum rogabat et discessit omnis 
gravitudo magica tenebrarum a campo Ai et dixit deo gratias et venie- 
runt per alveum fluminis Sinnce qua? dicitur Bandea ad tumulum Gradi in 
quo loco ordinavit Alb eum sanctum prespiterum cui indicavit altare mi* 

d 



XVI APPENDIX. 

cxx. et provenerat sicut omnibus totius Hiberniae annis celebratur et 
contra noctem terminum pones quia in ilia die mortis ejus nox non erat et 
per duodecimas dies in ilia provincia in qua mortis ejus exequiae peractse 
sunt nox non irruit et fuscis tellurem non amplexerat alis et pallor non 
tantus erat noctis et astri fortis non induxerat bosferus umbras. Et plebs 
Ulod dixerunt quod usque in finem anni totius in quo abierat nunquam 
noctium tales tenebrae erant quales antea fuerant. Quod ad tanti viri 
meritura declarandum esse dubium est vi. Ad propinquante autem hora 
obitus sui sacrincium ab episcopo Tassach sicut illi Victor anguelus dixit 
ad viaticum beate vita* accipiat. 

In prima nocte exequiarnm ejus angueli vigilias salmi corporis fece- 
runt in vigiliarum et psalmorum moribus omnibus quicumque ad vigilias 
in ilia prima nocte veniebant dormientibus homines orantes et psalmos 
cantantes corpus custodierunt. 

Postquam autem in ccelum profecti sunt angueli odorem suavissimum 
quasi mellis et fragrantiam dulcidinis quasi vini dimisserunt ut impleretur 
quod in benedictione beatie patriarchal Jacob dictum est. Ecce odor filii 
mei tamque odor agri pleni quam benedixit Dominus viii. 

Quando autem anguelus ad eum venit consilium sepulture dedit illi 
eleganter duas boves indomiti et pergant quocumque voluerint et ubi 
cumque requiescunt ecclesie in honorem corpusculi tui edificetur et sicut 
anguelus dixit instabiles electi sunt juvenci et stabili plaustrum gestamine 
humeri* impositum esse sancto corpore vechunt et a loco qui Clocher vo- 
catur ab oriente Findubrec de pecoribus Conail electio clarificavit boves et 
exierunt dei natu regente ad Dun leth glaisse ubi sepuitus est Patricius et 
dixit ei ne reliquiae a terra reducuntur corporis tui et cubitus de terra 
super corpore fiat quod jussu dei factum in novissimis demonstratum est 
temporibus quia quando ecciesia super corpore facta est fodientes humum 
antropi ignem a sepulcro inrumpere viderunt et recedentes flammi ge- 
ram timuerunt flamme ignem. 

De reliquis Sancti Patricii in tempore obitus sui dira contensio ad 
belltim usque perveniens inter nepotes Niell et orientales ex una parte 
inter aliquando propinquales et propinquos nunc inter dirissimos hostes 
irarum intrat certamen secundum fretum quoddam quod Collum Bovis 
vocatur merito Patricii sanguis effunderetur et misericordiae dei altis 
crispantibus quae intumescebant fluctibus et undarum vertices concave 
rumpebant eera et dorsa in fluctibus tremula aliquam crispanti rissu et 



LIBER ARDMACH.E— VITA S. PATRIC1I. XVll 

aliquando flavis vallibus in certamine mebat quasi ed cohibendam animo~ 
sitatem gentium dirare tales enim popull sunt surrexit freti feritaset 
plebem pugnari pftihibuit. Postea autem sepulto Patricio et freti 
tumore sepulto orientales et contra Utta nepotes Neill acritef ad certa- 
men ruunt et ceftatim preparati et armati ad bellum ad locum beati 
corporis prorumperat sicut felici seducti sunt fallacia. putantes se duos 
boves et plaustrum invenire et corpus sanctum rupere estimabunt et cum 
corpore et tali preparata et armatura usque adjluvium Cabceiina perve'nl- 
erunt et corpus tunc illis non comparuit impossibiie enim ut de tanto ac 
de beato corpore pax fieret nisi dei natu taliter videretur vissio ad tern- 
porum distensa ne quod animarum salus innumerab ilium in exitum et 
mortem ut teste! ur felici fallacia ostensum est sicut Siti antea excscati 
ne sanctam profetam Heleseum occiderent ad Heleseum divina provisione 
ad Samariam usque ducti sunt haec etiam seductio ad concordiam populo- 
rum facta est. 

Iterum recurrit oratio anguelus in omni septima die septimane semper 
venire consuerat et sicut homo cum homine loquitur iter conloquio angu- 
eli fruebatur Patricius etiam in xm anno etatis captus et vi annos servi- 
unt et per xxx vices conductionem anguelus ad eum venerat et consiliis 
atque conloquiis fruebatur anguelicis antequam de Scotia ad Latinos per- 
geret centies in die et centies in nocte orabat aliquando sues custodiens 
perdidit eas et anguelus veniens ad eum sues indicavit ill! aliquando etiam 
anguelus illi loquens multa illi dixit et postquara illi locutus est pedem 
super petram ponens Inscirit in montem Mis coram se ascendit vestigia 
pedes angueli in petra hue usque manentia cernuntur et in illo loco xxx 
vicibus ad eum locutus est et illi locus et ibi fidelium preces fructum feli- 
cissimum obtinerit. 

PINIT AMEN. 

Porta vit Patricius per Sininn secum l clocos l patinos t, calices altaria 
libros legis evangelii libros et r eli quit illos in locis novis. 

Patricius vi anno baptizatus est xx captus est xii servivit xl legit lxi 
docuit tota vero etas ejus cxi. 

time Constans in Grallis irivenit. 

Patricius venit de campo Arthice ad Dramritut Cerigfet ad Namniu 
Toisdaft ad Mitch Esrachtae et viderunt ilium cum viris viii. aut ix. cum 

c 



XV1U APPENDIX, 

tabulis in manibus scriptts more Moysaico exclamaverunt gentiles super 
illos at sanctos occiderent et dixerunt gladios in manibus habent ad occi- 
dendos homiues videntur lignei in die apud illos sed ferreos gladios esti- 
mamus ad effun.l * dum >an n.inem voluit muhicilo uimia malefacere in 
sanctos sed fuit vir mixr rict/isap.id illo* J I avail h nomine de genere Nothi 
pater F.r^dachi crrdidit dco latricii et bibtizabat ilium Patricias et Fe- 
redachum filium ejus et iiumolavit (ilium Patricio et exivit cum Patricio 
ad legending xxx annos et ordinavit ilium in urbe Roma et dedit illi 
noraen novum Sachellum et scripsit illi librum psalmorum quam vidi et 
portavit ab illo partem de reliquiis Petri et Pauli Laurentii et Stefani 
quae sunt in Machi. Caetiacus itaque et Sachellus ordinabant episcopis 
presbyteri diaconos clericos sine consilio Patricii in campo A si et accur- 
savit illos Patricius et mittens epistolas illis exierunt ad penitentiam ducti 
Arddmachae ad Patricium et fecerunt psnitentiani monachorum ii pueri 
Patricii prumpti et dixit eis non magna; erunt ecclesiae vera?. 



DICTA PATRICII. 

Timorem dei habui ducem itineris mei per Gallias atque Italiam etiam 
in insolis quae sunt in mari Terreno. De sacculo requisaistis ad Parradissum 
deo gratias ecclesia Scotorum immo Romanorum, ut Christiani ita ut 
Romani sitis ut decantetur vobiscum. Opportet omni hora orationis vox 
ilia laudabilis Curie Lession Christe Lession omnis ecclesiis qua? sequitur 
me cantet Cyrie lession Christe lession deo gratias. 

TIRECHANI ANNOTATIONES. 

Tirechan Episcopus haec scripsit ex ore vel libro Ultani episcopis 
cujus ipse alumnus vel discipulus fuit. 

Inveni quatuor nomina in libro scripta Patricio apud Ultanum epis- 
copum Conchuburnensium Sanctus Magonus qui est clarus, Succetus qui 
est Patricius ColhirlMac quia servivit ii i i domibus magorum et empsit 
ilium unus ex eis cui nomen erat Miliuc mac Cuboin magus et servivit illi 
vii annis omni servitute ac duplici labore et porcarium possuit eura in 
montanis convallibus. Deinde autem visitavit ilium anguelus domini in 
somniis incacuminibus montis Scirte juxta montem Miss. Finita autem 
angueli sententia ecce navis tua parata surge et ambula et secessit ab illo 
in ccelum surrexit et ambulavit et ut dixit illi anguelus domini Victor 
nomine in xvii. statis sue anno captus ductus venditus est in Hi be mi am. 



LIBER ARDMACHiE VITA S. PATRICII. XIX 

In xxii anno eetatis laboris magis relinquere potuit vii aliis annis ambu- 
lavit et navigavit in fluctibus et in campistribus locis et in convallibus 
montanis per Gallias at que I tali am totam atque in insolis quae sunt in mari 
Terreno ut ipse dixit in commenioratione laborum. Erat autem in una 
ex insolis quae dicitur Aralanensis annis xxx mihi testante Ultano epis- 
copo. Omnia autem quae evenerunt invenietis in plana illius historia 
script a. Haec sunt novissima illius mirabilia in ii regui anno Logairi 
mac Neill finita atque feliciter facta. 

A passione autem Christi colleguntur anni ccccxxxvi usque ad mor- 
tem Patricii. 

Duobus autem vel v annis regnavit Loigaire post mortem Patricii. 

Omnis autem regni illius tempus xxxiii ut putamus. 

Venit vero Patricius cum Gallis ad insolas mac Euchor et insola orien- 
tali quae dicitur insola Patricii et secum fuit nmliitudo episcoporum 
sanctorum et presbyterorum et diaconorum ac exorcistarum hostiario- 
rum lectorumque nee non filiorum quos ordinavit. 

Ascendit autem de mari ad campum Breg sole orto cum benedictione 
dei cum vero sole mire doctrine densas tenebras ignorantie inluminans 
ad Hiberniara ingens Lucifer sanctus episcopus oritur et antifana assiduo 
erat ei de fine ad finem in nomine domini dei patris et filii atque spiritu 
sancti Jesu Christi benigni hoc autem dicitur in Scotica lingua Ochen. 

Primo vero venit ad vallem Sescnani et edificavit ibi ecclesiam primam 
et portavit filium Sesceneum nomine Episcopum secum et reliquit ibi ii 
pueros peregrinos. Vespere vero venit ad hostium Ailbine ad quendam 
virum bonum et babtizavit ilium et invenit cum illo filium placitum sibi 
et dedit illi nomen Benignum quia coliegebat pedes Patricii inter manus 
suas et pectus et noluit dormire apud patrem et matrem sed flevit nisi 
cum Patricio dormiret. Mane autem facto cum surgeret completa bene* 
dictione super patrem Benigni Patricius currum conscendit et pedes illius 
diverso alter in curru et alterum super terram erat et Benignus puer 
pedem Patricii tenuit duobus manibus strictis et clamavit sinite te me 
apud Patricium patrem proprium mihi et dixit Patricius baptizate eum 
et elevate eum in currum quia heres regni niei est. Ipse est Benignus 
episcopus successor Patricii in ecclesiae Machae. 



AfPPNDIX. 



He epitooporum numaro quoi ordinavit in Hiberaia ecccl. 

De pNMbyterit bod poMunus ooordiaare qaia babti?abat cotidie 
bomines et illis litteras legebat ac abgatoiias et de alits opiseapos ac prev 
bytaros foiebat quia in etate propria baptiamum aceipenrat aobrja. 



DE EPISCOPIS. 



Be ni gnus. 

Bronufi. 

Sachellus. 

Cethiacus. 

Carthacus. 

Cartenus. 

Conoanus. 

Fintranua. 

giggeus. 

CEternus. 

Sencaticus. 

Olcanus. 

Jborus. 

Ordiui. 

Nazariua. 

Miserneus. 

Senachus. 

Secundinus. 

GpsacUus. 

Camulacus. 

Auxilius, 

Yictoricua. 



Bressialius. 

Feccus. 

Menathus. 

Cennairaus. 

Na?aru8. 

Melus. 

Ilaceleus. 

Agactaleus. 

Culeneus. 

Asacus. 

Bitheus. 

Falertus. 

Sescneus. 

Muirehthchus. 

Temoreris qui fuudavit ec- 
clesiam sanctam Cairce quia 
tenuit familia Clonoaviss. 

Daigneus, 

Justianus ftfac Hi* Paimeni. 

Oloacnus. 

Qomnallus et alii quapi pUi 
rimi. 



DE PREJSBYTERIS. 



Anicius. 

Brocidius. 

Amergenus. 

Lommanm. 

Catideus. 



Catus. 

Catanus. 

BrosQUs. 

Ailbeus. 

Trianus. 



LIBER ARDMACtf^— -VITA S. PATRIC1I. XXI 



DE NOMINIBUS EPISCOPORUM FRANCORUM PATRICIl 

EPISCOPI TRES. 



Insppitti. 



Berqiciui. 



Herniciu*. 



DE SUBDIACONIS. 



Soman. 

Semen. 

Cancen. 

Berniciusdiaeoimset Ernkhw 

Franci viri zii. cum sorore 

una aut vi. vel. iii. 
Cassanus. 
Conlung. 
Erclung. 



Brocauua. 

Roddanua. 

Brigson. 

et alter Roddanus qui fun* 

davit occloiiam Senem Be* 

potem Alello quam teznie* 

runt monachi Patricii Gen* 

gen et Sannuch. 



DE DIACONXS. ' 



J}iaqenu.s Ivostus qui bapti?* 
avit Ceranum filium artifc* 
cis ex Uberis Patricii. 

Diaeonus Coimmanua Carus 
Patricio qui fuit iu secde-* 
sia magna Ardlicce. 



Qlcanus monachus qui fuit in 
cellola magna Mumd* pxea* 
piteri ii, exorcistas scimu& 
apud ilium exorcista Losca 
in dorao Dairi* 



In regienibus Twrtoi exorcista* alii in campo JJphi* De aecclesiis 
quas fundavit in campo Breg primum in Culmine ii «qcleai» Cera* fh qua 
sepultua e*t ffircu* qui portavit mortalitatem magnam Ui in cacumlnibus 
Aisse iiii in Blaitimu v in Collumbas in qua ordinavit Eugtnium Sanctum 
Episcopum vi cecclesiee filio Laithphi vii Imbridam in qua fuit sanctus 
dttkis frater Qirthtci viii super Augethar in qua jfoanaaua epUcopus 
quem ordinavit Patricius in primp Pascha Hffirti viroxum Feicc qui 
portavit cecum ignem primum benedictum ae ceriales lucernaa prinma 
Patricii de manibtts poxtavit domi ut a&cenderet fvuoum benexUctnm in 
oculoa ac nates, hominum gentUium et regis Imgairi et magorum iltiiM 
quia contraverunt iUi tres magi fratres ex uno viro nominibus et genera 
Crutk Loch Lttklanii de genera Rwtir qui fecerunt conflictionem magnaa. 
contra Patricium et Benignum cassula autem magi inflammata est circa Be* 
nignum et in cinerem finita erat. Sanctus quoque filius sanus effectus est 



XX11 APPENDIX. 

finna fide dei in conspectu regis et hominura et magorum cassula autem 
Benigni filii Patricii infixa est circa magum et inflammatus est magus in 
medio ac consumptus est et dixit Patricius in hac hora consumpta est 
gentilitas Hibernie tota et elevavit Patiicius manus suas deo circa magum 
Loch Letheum et dixit Domine mi jece a me canem qui oblatrat faciem 
tusm et me eat in mortem et intenderunt omnes magum elevatum per 
tenebras nocturnales poene usque ad caelum sed reversus cadaver illius 
conglutinatum grandinibus et nivibus commixtum scintillis igneis in ter- 
rain ante faciem omnium cecidit et est lapis illius in oris australibus 
orientalibusque usque in presentem diem et conspexi ilium oculis meis. 

Prima feria venit ad Taltenam ubi fit Agon regale ad Coirpriticum 
filium Neill qui voluit eum occidere et flagellavit servos ejus in flumine 
Sele ut indicarent Patricium Coirpritico quapropter appellabat ilium 
patrem inimicum dei et dixit ei semen tuum serviet seminibus fratrum et 
non erit de semine tuo rex in sternum et non erunt pisces magni in flu- 
mine Sele semper. 

Deinde autem venit ad Conallum filium Neill ad domum illius qui 
fundavit in k>co in quo est ho die ecclesia Patricii magna et su see pit eum 
cum gaudio magno et baptizavit ilium et firmavit solium ejus in aeternum 
et dixit illi semen fratrum tuorum tuo semini serviet in sternum. Et tu 
missericordiam debes facere heredibus meis post me in saeculum et filii 
tui et filiorum tuorum filiis meis credulis legitimum sempiternum pensabat- 
que aecclesiam deo Patricii pedibus ejus lx pedum et dixit Patricius si di- 
minuatur ecclesia ista non erit longum regnum tibi et firmum. 

Pasca quoque claussa finita prima feria exiit ad vadum MoUb Broon et 
ibi ecclesiam fundavit in qua reliquit iii fratres cum una sorore et haec 
sunt nomina illorum Cathaceus Cathurus Catneus et soror illorum Catnca 
quae emulgebat lac ab dammulis feris ut senes mihi indicaverunt. 

Perrexitque ad civitatem Temro ad Loigarium filium Neill iterum 
quia apud ilium foedus pepigit ut non occideretur in regno illius sed non 
potuit credere dictus nam Neill pater meus non sinivit mihi credere sed 
ut sepeliar in cacuminibus Temro quasi viris consistentibus in bello quia 
utuntur gentiles in sepulcris armati prumptis armis facie ad faciem usque 
ad diem Erdathe apud mngos id est iu diei diem domini. Ego filius Neill 
et filius Dunlinge Immaij'tcn in campo Liphi produritate odivi ut est 
hoc. 



LIBER ARDMACHiE VITA S. PATRICII. XX111 

Porro fundavit aecclesiam Jcarric Dagri et alteram ecclesiam Immruig 
Thuaithe et scripsit elimenta Cerpano et intravit in domum regiam et non 
surrexerunt ante se nisi untis tantuni hoc e-t Hircus sacn^us et dixit 
illi Cur tu solus surrexUti in honorem del n ei in me. Et dixit ei 
Hercus nescio quid video scintillas igneas de lahiis tuis a.-cendere in 
labia msa. Sanctus quoque dixit si baptizaris domini accipies quod ms 
cum est ra-pondit accipi.mi et vanisrunt ad font em Loigles in Scotica no- 
biscum vitulus civitatum. Cumque aperuisset librum alque baptizasset 
virum Hercum audivit viros post ter^um suum se inridentes ad invicetn 
de rei illius consideration quia nescierunt quid fecerat et baptizavit tot 
milia hominum in die ill i et intercaeteras baptismatis sententias audivit. 
Ecce ii namque viri nobiles confabulabantur post tergum s!bi et dixit 
alter alteri verum est quod dixisti a circulo anni quae praeteriit ut ve- 
il isses hue in illis diebus. 

Die mihi nomen tuum quaeso et patris tui et agri tui et campi tui et ubi est 
domus tua. Respondeus filius Amolngid sum ego filius Fechrach filii Echach 
ab occidentalibus plagis de campo Donmon et de silva Fochloth. Cumque 
audiisset patris nomen silva? Fochlothi gavissus est valde et dixit Endeo 
Amolngid filio et ego tecum exibo si vivus fuero quia dixit mihi do minus 
exire et dixit Endeus non exibis mecum ne occidamur ad invicem Sanctus 
quoque dixit verum tamen nam quod vivus ad tuara regionem pervenies et 
tu nisi venero tecum et vitam aeternam non habebis quia propter me venisti 
hue quasi Joseph ante filios Israel. Endeus autem dixit Patricio tu filio 
meo baptismum da quia tener est ego autem et fratres mei non possumus 
tibi credere usque dum ad nostrum plebem pervenerimus ne inrideant nos. 
Conallus autem babtizatus est et dedit Patricius benedictionem super 
ilium et tenuit manum illius et dedit Cethaco episcopo et nutrivit ilium et 
docuit eum Cethiacus et Mucneus f rater Cethiaci episcopi cujus sunt reli- 
quiae in aecclesia magna Patricii in silva Fochlithi propter hoc mandavit 
Conallo insolam suum Cethiacus et generis illius est usque in presentem 
diem quia laicus fuit post mortem Cethichi sancti. 

Venierunt autem filii Amolngid sex ad judicandum ante faciem Loigarii 
et Endeus contra eos unus et filius ejus tener et Patricius ante illos et in- 
terrogaverunt vestigaverunt causam hereditatis illorum et judicavit illis 
Loigaire et Patricius ut dividerent inter se hereditatem in septem partes 
et dixit Endeus filium meum et partem hereditatis mea? ego immolo deo 
Patricii et Patricio per hoc dicunt alii quia servi sum us Patricii usque in 
presentem diem foedus pepigerunt per manus Loigairi filii Ndll Patricius 
•t filii Amolngid cum exercitu laicorum episcopis sanctorum et inierunt 



j 



XXIV APPENDIX. 

iter facere ad montem Egle et extendit Patricias etiam pretium daodecem 
armatorum hominum ut inscriptions sua adfirmat de argento et auro ut 
nullum malorum hominum impediret eos in via recta transeuntes totam 
Hiberniam. Quia necessitas poscit illos ut pervenirent silvam Fochlitki 
ante caput anni pasca secunda causa filiorum clamantium clamofe magno 
noces audivit in utero mateum suarum dicentium veni Sancte Patrici salvos 
nos facere. 

Piantavit ecclesiam super vadum $egf alteram aecclesiam Cinnena 
Sancta super vadum Carnoi Imboind et altera super Coirp Railhe et altera 
super fossam Dall Bronig quam tenuit episcopus films Cartin avunculus 
Brigitce Sancta? . Fundavitque alteram in campo Echredd alteram in campo 
Taidcni quae dicitur Cellbilc apud familiam Scirest alteram in campo 
Echnach in qua fuit Cassanus presbyter alteram in Singitibus. Alteram 
in campo BiU juxta vadum Capitis Canis alteram in capite CarmetU in 
campo Teloch in qua Sancta Brigita pallium cepit sub fnauibtrs filii CaHU. 
In Huisniuch Midi mansit juxta Petram Coithrlgi sed occisi sunt circa se 
alii perigrini a filio FecAach fiTii Neill cui maledixit dieen* non er it de stifpe 
tua rex sed servies semini fratrum tuorum. Et alteram ecdlesfam in capite 
Airt in regionibus Roide in qua posuit altare lapideum et alteram Jffi- 
cuil Corn et venit per flumen Ethne in ii Tetkbias et ordinavit MeluM 
episcopum et ecclesiam BiU fundavit et ordinavit Gosactum filium Milcon 
mac Cubooin quern nutrivit in servitute septem annorum et mittens Camula- 
cum Commiensium in campum Cuini et digito illi indicavit locum de 6acu- 
mine Graneret id est ecclesiam Raithin. 

Et venit in campum Rein et ordinavit Bruscum presbyterum et eccle- 
siam illi fundavit qui dixit mirabile post mortem ejus altero sancto qui 
fuit in insola generis CcftirH benedict us est triduum filium tuum habes ego 
autem tedebit me mors mea quia solus sum in aecclesia in deserto in asccie- 
sia relicta ac vacua et non offerant juxta me sacerdotes in noctibus sorii- 
nium faciens est tertio die surrexit sanctus et arripuit anulum et trull am 
ferrumque et sepulcri fossam fodivit et portavit ossa Brusci sancti secum 
ad insolam in qua sunt et restiant. 

Mittens autem Patricius Methbrain ad fossam Slecht barbarum Patricii 
propinquum qui dicebat mirabilia in deo vera. Venitque Patricius ad 
alveum Sinone ad locum in quo mortuus fuit auriga illius Boidmalus et 
sepultus ibi in quo dicitur Cail Boidmail usque in hanc diem et immola- 
tus erat Patricio. 



LIBER AUDMACIIiE- — VITA S. PATRICII. XXV 

Finit liber primus in regionibus nepotum Neill peractus. Incipit 
secundus in regionibus Connacht peractus. 



Omnia quae scripsi a principio libri hujus scitis quia in vestris regioni* 
bus gesta sunt nisi de eis pauca quae inveni inutilitatem laboris mei a 
senioribus inultis ac ab illo Ultano episcopo Conchuberriensi qui nutrivit me 
r&tulit sermo. Cor autem meum cogitat in me. De Patricii dilectione 
quia video dissertores et archiclocos et milites Hibernian quod odio habent : 
paruchiam Patricii quia substraxerunt ab eo quod ipsius erat thnent qua* 
quam si quaereret heres Patricii paruchiam illius potest pene totatn inso* 
lam sibi reddere in paruchiam quam deus dedit ill t . 

I* Totam iasolam cum hominibus per anguelum Domini, 

II. Et legem domini docuit ill is. 

III. Et babtismo dei babtizavit illos* 

IV. Et crucem Christ i indicavit. 

V. Et resurrectionem ejus nuntiavit sed fa mi li am ejus non diligunt quia 
non licet jurare contra eum et super eum et de eo. 

VI. Et non lignum licet contra eum mitti quia ipsius sunt omnia primiti© 
aecclesiae Hiberniae sed juratur a se omne quod juratur. 

Omnia autem quae scripsi ab initio libri hujus simplicia sunt. Omne 
autem quod restat strictius erit. 

Venit ergo Patricius sane t as per alveum fluminis Sinne per vadum 
duorum avium in campum Ai. Audientes autem magi Loigairi filii Neill 
omnia qua facta fuerunt Calvus et Capito'anium ii fratres qui nu trie rant 
duas Alias Loigairi Ethne Alba Fedelm Nufa timentes Be mores sancti viri 
ace ipe rent indignati sunt valde tenebrasque nocturnales ac densas inauri- 
nas super totum campum Ai fecerunt nescimus cujus potestatis hoc fuit 
sed scimus quod nox longua trium dierum totum et noctium erat. Am- 
puitque sanctus jejunium tribus diebus et tribus noctibus cum centenis ora- 
culis flectenisque assiduis deum regem re gum rogabat et discessit omnis 
gravitudo magica tenebrarum a campo Ai et dixit deo gratias et venie- 
runt per alveum fluminis Sinnee quae dicitur Bandea ad tumulum Gradi in 
4juo loco ordinavit Alb eum sanctum prcspiterum cui indicavit altare mi- 

d 



XXVI APPENDIX. 

rabile lapideum in monte nepotum AileUo quia inter nepotes AileUo erat et 
babtizavit Maneum sanctum quem ordinavit episcopus Bromu fiiius Jest 
•ervus dei socius Patricii. Venierunt ad campum Glais et in illo posnit 
cellolam magnam que sic vocatur cellula magna et in ilia reliquit duos 
barbaros Conleng et Erclcng barbaros monachos sibi. 

Deinde venit ad Assicum et Bitium et ad magos qui fuerunt de genere 
Corcichon Luain Cone et JM, fratres alter suscepit Pairicium et sanctos 
ejus cum gaudio et immolavit sibi domum suum. 

Et exiit ad Imbliuch Hortton quod dixit illi Patricius Semen tunm erit 
benedictum et de tuo semine erunt sacerdotes domini et principes digni 
in mea elimosina et tua hereditate et posuit ibi Assicum et Bet hewn filium 
fratres Assici et Cipiam matrem Bethei episcopi. 

Asicus sanctus episcopus faber aereus erat Patricio et faciebat altaria 
bibliothecas quas faciebat in patinos sancti nostri pro honore Patricii epis- 
copi et de illis tres patinos" quadratos vidi id est patinum in aecclesia 
Patricii in Arddmacha et alterum in aecclesia Alofind et tertium in aec- 
clesia magna Saeoli super altare Felarti sancti episcopu 

Asicus iste fecit profugam in aquilonem regionis ad montem lapidis et 
fuit septem annis in insolam quae vocatur Rochuil retro montem lapidum et 
quaerebant ilium monachi sui et invenierunt eum in convallibus suis mon~ 
tanis juxta laborem artificiorura et abstraxerunt eum monachi ejus et raor- 
tuus erat apud illos in disertis montibus et sepelierunt eum Hirraith 
Chungai Hisertib et dedit rex illi et monachis suis post mortem fcenum 
centum vaccarium cum vitulis suis et bovum xx. immolatio asterna quia 
dixit quod non revertetur in campum Ai quia mendaciam ab illo dixerunt 
et sunt ossa ejus in campo Sered Hirraith Chungi monachus Patricii sed 
contenderunt eum familiae Columba CiUe et familia Airdd Strath a. 

Patricius vero venit de fonte Alofind addu Mecham nepotem AileUo et 
fundavit in illo loco aecclesiam qua? sic vocatur Senella cella Dumiche us* 
que hanc diem in quo reliquit viros sanctos Macet et Cetgen et Rodanum 
prespiterum. 

Et venit apud se filia felix imperigrini nationem nomine Mathona soror 
Benigni successoris Patricii quae tenuit pallium apud Patricium et i2o- 
danum monacha fuit illis et exiit per montem filiorum Ailello et plantavit 
aecclesiam liberam HUamnuch et honorata fuerat a deo et hominibus et 



LIBER ARDMACHJE— ^-VITA S, PATRIC1I. XXV11 

ipsa fecit amicitiam ad reliquias sancti Rodanni et successores illius epula- 
bantur ad in vice m. v 

Posihac autem posuerunt episcopbs juxta sanctam ecclesiam Hitam- 
nuch quos ordinaverunt episcopi Patricii id est Bronus et Beitheus non 
quaerebant aliquid a familia JJumiche nisi amicitiam tantummodo sed quse- 
rit familia Clono qiiia per vim tenuit locibus Patricii multos post morta- 
litates novissimas deinde autem venit sanctus Patricius ad fontem quae di- 
citur Clebach in lateribus Crochan contra ortum solis ante ortum solis et 
sederunt juxta fontem et ecce do® filiae regis Loigairi Ethne Alba et Fe- 
delm Nufa ad fontem more mulierum ad lavandum mane venerunt. Et 
Senodum sanctum episcopum cum Patricio juxta fontem invenierunt. 

Et quocumque essent Sed illos viros Side 

aut quacumque forma aut deorum terrenorum 

aut quacumque plebe aut fantassiam estimaverunt 

aut quacumque regione non cog- et dixerunt filiee illis. 
noverunt 

Ubi vos sitis et unde venistis ? Et dixit Patricius ad illas. Melior 
erat vos deo vero non confiteri quam de genere non interrogare ? 

Dixit filia prima. Quis est Deus ? Et ubi est Deus ? Et cujus est 
Deus ? Et ubi habitaculum ejus ? Si habet filios et filias aurum et argen- 
turn deus vester si vivus semper ? Si pulcher ? Si filitim ejus nutrierunt 
multi ? Si filia? ejus cane et pulchrae sunt hominibus mundi in coelo an in 
terra est ? - 

In aequore quomodo delegitur 

in fluminibus quomodo invenitur 

in montahis si in juventute 

in convallibus si in senectute 

Die nobis notitiam ejus invenitur. 
quomodo videbitur 

Respondens autem Sanctus Patricius spiritu sancto pleritts dixit. 

Deus noster deus omnium hominum deus coeli ac terras maris et flumi- 
nium deus solis ac lunae omnium siderum deus montium sublimium valli- 
umque humilium DeUs super coelo et in coelo et sub coelo habet habitacu- 
lum erga coelum et terrain et mare et omnia qua? sunt in eis. 






XXV11I APPENDIX, 

luspirat omnia superat onm&r 

\ivificat omnia sufultat omnia. 

SoKs lumen inlumraat lumen nodi* et nothias valat et fontes fecit- i* 
arrida terra «t insolas in mari siccas et stellas in ministerium majorum lu- 
minum posuit. Filium habet coaeternum sibi consimilem sibi uec junior 
filius patri nee pater filio senior et spirit us sanctus inflat in eis ne separa- 
tim pater et filius et spiritus sanctus. 

Ego vero volo vos regi ceelesti conjunguere dum fiHae regis terreni 
sitis credere et dixerunt filis si ex uno ore unoque corde quomodo credere 
possinius ccdesti regi doce nos diligentissime ut videamus ilium facie ad 
faciem indica nobis et quomodo dixeris nobis faciamus. Et dixit Patri- 
cius si creditis per babtismum patris et matris jeeere peccatum I Respon- 
dent credimus si pcenitentiam creditis post peccatum ? Credimus si credi- 
tis vitau post mortem ? Si creditis resurrectionem in die judicii ? Cre- 
dimus. 

Si creditis unitaiem ecclesiae ? Credimus. 

Et babtizatse sunt et Candida veste in capitibus eorum. Et postulate-* 
runt videre faciem Christi et dixit eis sanctus nisi mortem gustaveritis 
non potestis videre faciem Christi et nisi sacrificium accipiet. 

Et respondent da nobis sacrificium ut possimus filium nostrum sponsum 
videre et acciperunt ea charitiam dei et dormientium iu morte et 
posuerunt illos in lectulo uno vestimentis cooperitis et fecerunt ululatunu 



[Here two pages in the MS. so much defaced as to be illegible.} 

Et venit in campum Caeri et castra metati sunt Icuil Core et plantavit 
aecclesiam in illo loco et batrtizavit illos multos et exinde exiit ad campum 
Foinisen et invenit in illo loco duos fratres filios viri nominati Cqsiiiud filius 
Luchii filii Conlaid et Derclaid qui mittebat servum suum ut occideret 
Patricium. 

Luctcus autem liberavit eum cui dixit Patricius erunt episcopi et pres-r 
piteri de genere tuo. Generis autem fratris tui erit maledictum et diffi- 
dent in brevi. Et reliquit in illo loco Cananum prespiterum, 



LIBER ARDMACHiE — VITA S. PATRIC1I. . XXlX 

Et exiit ad fontem Stringille in disertis et fuit super ipse duobus domi* 
nicis et exiit ad campum Raithin et exiit ad finem Hiimail Duachud Fo- 
buir in quo fiunt episcopi et venit ad ilium sancta filia quae pallium' tenuit 
apud Patricium et ordinavit filium patres illius Senachus et dedit nomen 
novam illi id est Agnus Dei episcopus fecit ilium. 

Et ipse postulavit tres postulationesa Patricio ut non peccaret sub gradu 
et iron vocaretur nomen ejus super locum et deesset de illius estate super 
aetatem filii sui veniret. Oingis nomine cui scripsit Patricius abgitorium in 
die qua ordinatus erat Senachus quia Patricius ordinavit ascclesiam in illo 
loco apud filiam Mat ho nam nomine et dixit illis erunt episcopi boni hie 
et de semine illoruni erunt benedicti in secula in cathedra hac ipsa est 
Achad Fobuir et missam Patricii accip erunt. 

Et perexit Patricius ad montem Egli ut jejunaret in illo xl dibus et 
xl noctibus. Moysaicam tenens disciplinam et HeUacum et Christianam 
et defunctus est auriga illius Himuiriscc Aigli hoc est campum inter mare 
et Aigleum et sepeliunt ilium aurigam totum calvum et congregavit la- 
pides erga sepulcrum et dixit sit sic in sternum et visitabitur a me in 
novissimis diebus. Et exiit Patricius ad cacumina montis super Crochan 
Aigli et mansit ibi xl diebus et xl noctibus et graves aves fuerunt erga 
ilium et non poterat videre faciem cceli et terra et maris quia Hibernie 
Sanctis omnibus preteritis presentatis futurus deus dixit. 

Ascendite O Sancti super montem qui inminet et altior omnibus 
montibus qui sunt ad occidentem solis ad benedicendos Hibernia populos 
ut videret Patricius fructum sui laboris quia oorus sanctorum omnium Hi- 
bernensium ad eum venit ad patrem eorum visitandum et plantavit aeccle- 
siam in campo Humail. 

Et venit in regiones Corcutemne ad fontem Sini in quo babtizavit milia 
hominum multa fundavit »cclesias iii Toga. 

Et veuit ad fontem Findmaige qui dicitur Slan quia indicatam illi 
quod honorabant magi fontem et immolaverunt dona ad ilium in donum 
dii. 

Fons vero quadratus fuit et petra quadrata erat in ore fontis et venie- 
bat aqua super (erga) petram id est perglutinationes quasi vestigium re- 
gale et dixerunt increduli quod quidam profeta mortuus fecit bibliothe- 
cam sibi in aqua sub petra ut dealbaret ossa sua semper quia tenuit ignis 



XXX APPENDIX. 

exustera quia adorabant fontem in modum duL Et i oik i turn est Patricio 
causa adorationis et ipse aelum dei habuit de deo vivo. 

Dixit non verum quod dicitis quod rex aquarum fons erat quia dede- 
runt illi nomen aquarum rex et congregati sunt magi et gentiles regionis 
illius et multitudo multa nimis ad fontem. Et Patricius ait illis elevate 
petram videamus quid sub est si ossa an non quia dico vobis sub ea ossa 
hominis non sunt sed puto aliquid de auro et argento perglutinationem 
petrarum minime de vestris reprobis immolationibus et non potuerunt 
immolare petram elevare. 

Et benedixit Patricias et servi ejus petram et dixit Patricius multitu- 
dini procul recedite paulisper ut videatk virtutem dei met qui in ccelis 
habitat et expect is manibus elevavit petram ex ore fontis et ponebat illam 
e regione super ora fontis et est semper et nihil invenierunt in fonte nisi 
aquam tantum et crediderunt deo summo et sedit juxta lapidem procul 
quam infixit vir quidam cui benedixit Patricius Caeta seu Cata nomine 
et babtizabat ilium et dixit illi. Erit semen tuum benedictum in ssecula 
Celiuia Tog in regionibus Corcutemnc Patricii fuit Cainnechus episcopus 
monachus Patricii fundavit earn. 

Et venit Sanctus Patricius per campos in regionibus Maicc Herc<s In- 
dichuil et Aurchuil. Et venit Patricius Indichttil ad sepulchrum magnum 
magnitudinis mirae ingentemque longitudine quod invenit fa m ilia illius et 
magno stupore mirabantur pedes truxisse cxx et dixit non credimus hoc 
negotium quod erat homo longitudinis hujus et respondit Patricius et 
dixit. Si volueritis videbitis eum et dixerunt volumus et percussit baculo 
suo lapidem juxta caput ejus et signavit sepulchrum signaculo crucis et 
dixit. 

Agnon sepulchrum et aperuit et vir sanctus surrexit magnus sanus et 
dixit bene sit 



[MS. defaced.] 

non possimus ut nobiscum tu ambulatis quia non possunt homines videre 
faciem tuam — timore tuo sed erode deo cceli et babtismum domini ac- 
cipe et non reverteris in locum in quo fiebas et indica nobis cujus es. 

Ego sum Mace maicc Cats maic glais qui fui subulcus Rig Lugir rig 



LIBER ARDMACHjE VITA S. PATRICII. XXXI 

Hirotie jugulavit me Flan mace maicc con in regno Coirpri moth fer anno, 
cuj usque hodie et babtizatus est confessionem dei fecit et resticuit et 
positus est iterum in sepulcro suo. 

Et venit in album campnm in regionibus nepotum Maini et invenit in 
illo signaculum crucis Christi in ii sepulcra nova et de curru suo sanctus 
dixit quis est qui sepultus hie ? et respondet vox de sepulcro ecce sum 
homo gentilis. Respondit sanctus. Cur juxta te crux sancta infixa est ? 
Et iterum respondit quia vir qui sepultus est juxta latus meum rogavit 
mater ejus ut signum crucis poneretur juxta sepulcrum filii sui. Vir 
fatuus et insensatus posuit juxta me et exilitur Patricius de curru suo et 
tenuit crucem et evellabat de gentili tumulo et posuit super faciem babti- 
zati et ascendit super currum et oravit deum taciter. Cum dixisset li- 
bera nos a malo dixit illi auriga illius quid auriga illius inquit. Cur ap- 
pellasti gentilem non babtizatum virum ? 

Redeamus ad historiam nostram. Quia ingemesco virum sine bab- 
tismo melior erat apud deum ilium benedicere vice babtismatis et ef- 
fundere aquam baptismi super sepulcrum mortui et non respondit illi puto 
enim ideo eum reliquitur quia dens eum salvere noluit. 

Per Muadam vero venit et ecce audierunt magi ftliorum Amolngid quod 
sanctus vir venisset super eos in suas regiones proprias congregata est mul- 
titudo nimis magorum ad primum magum Recradum nomine qui voluit 
sanctum occidere Patricium. Et venit ad illos cum viiii magis induti ves- 
tibus albis cum hoste magico et viderunt ilium procul Patricius et Endeus 
filius Amolngid et Conallus Endi filius quando babtizavit Patricius multi- 
tudinem nimium. Cumque vidisset Endeus surrexit arripuit anna ut ma- 
gos repelleret quia ab illis erant magi transriolum aque nimium quasi 
milia passuum. 

Missit autem Patricius ConaUum filium Endi in obviam magis ut cog* 
novisserent ilium ne alium occiderent et stetit juxta magum filius insig- 
num et ecce vir sanctus surrexit Patricius et elevavit manum sinistram deo 
coeli et maledixit magum et cecidit mortuus in medio magorum ejus et dig- 
persus est vulgus in totum campum Domnon et exustus est ante faciem 
omnium in vindicte signum. Cum viderunt omnes homines hoc miracu- 
lum et babtizavit multos in ilia die et ordinavit Mucneum sanctum fratrem 
Cethachi et dedit illi libros legis vii quos reliquit post se Mace Cerce filio 
Mate Dregin. Et fundavit ecclesiam super silvam FochMth in qua sunt 
ossa sanctus Mucnoi episcopi quia deus dixit illi ut legem relioquerent et 



XXX11 APPENDIX. 

epitcopis ordinaret ibi et prespyteris et diaconis in ilia regione et bene- 
dixit Amolngid filium Fergussum fratrem Endi quia in agro ipsius virtu - 
tern fecit. 

Et ecce quidam vir venit ad illos nomine Mace Dreg in cum filiis vif. 
gentilibus et postulavit babtismum dei a Patricio et benedixit ilium cum 
filiis et eligit unum filium ex ipsis cui nomen erat Mace Ere a? et scripsit 
elementa et benedixit eum benedictione patris. Et dixit pater filii teduit 
me si tecum exierit filius meus. Et ait Patricius non erit ita sed ilium 
Brono Alio Jcni commendabo et Olcano. Extendit manum et indicavit 
ei locum in quo sunt ossa ejus procul et digito suo signavit locum et 
crucem posuit ibi. Et ecce ii filie venierunt ad Patricium et accipemnt 
pallium de manu ejus et benedixit illis locum super sylvam FochUthi. Et 
ecce Patricius perrexit ad agrum quod dicitur Foirrgea filiorum Amolr,- 
gid ad dividendum inter filios Amolngid et fecit ibi ecclesiam terrenam 
de homo quadratam quia non prope erat sylva. 

Et portaverurft ad ilium mulierem infirmam habentem in utero infan- 
tem et babtitzavit filium in utero matris aqua babtismi filii ipsa est aqua 
commonis muUris et sepelierunt earn in cacuminibus apcclesiss desuper et 
est pedes ipsi sancti juxta aecclesiam usque in presentem diem et edificavit 
recclesiam quandam apud familiam in sinu maris id est Ros filiorum Caitni. 

Et reversus est ad flumen Muiade Denectrige in Berlrigian et elvavit 
ibi lapidem in signaculum cruris Christi et dixit ecce hie invenietur aqua 
in novissimus diebus et babitabitur ame et fundavit ecclesiam juxta fossam 
Rigbairt et venit in Muiriscsain apud Bronum filium Icni et benedixit 
filium qui est Mace Rime episcopus et scripserunt elementa illi et Muir- 
eihacho episcopus qui fuit super flumen Bratho. 

Et venierunt trans litus Authnili in fines Jrei Patricius et Bromn et 
cum illis filius Erca? filii Dregin ad campum id est Ros Dregnige in quo 
loco est cassulus Broni et sedens ibi cecidit Patricii dens et dedit dentem 
Brono suo in relquias. 

Et dixit ecce mare jeciet nos de hoc loco innovissimis temporibus et 
exibitis ad flumen Slicichw ad sylvam. 

Et exiit trans montem filierum Ailello et fundavit fecclesiam ibi Tarn- 
nach et Ehenach et Cell Angli et Cell Senchu/r. 



»•! 



LIBER ARDMACIIJE VltA S. PATRICII. XXfclll 

Et exiit ad regiories tallrigi treinaige 6t fbeit tf cclesiam jtixta Driiihi- 
Itas et babtitzavit niultos et 3rexit ad campuni Aitittaige et fundavit 
eecclesiam ibi id est Domnach Ailmaige quia Patricius illic mansit tribus 
diebus et tribus noctibus. 

Et perrexit ad camputti Aint et pbsuit &t»clesiam ibi et versus est Bv6l 
et in campuni Oethi et maledixit mimgn qiiod diclttif Niger DrobAichm 
autem benedixit ih quo tebentur inagai pisces sub pisciuin geri * * * 
effectual est Flumen DrObiasco ndn habuit ante pisces sed postea piscato- 
ribus fructum dat quia postulavit et nihil illi piscium dabant sancto. 

Et maledixit aliis fluninibus id est flu mini Oingte et Steli quia dimersi 
sunt ii pueri de pueris Patricii in $&U qtia propter ht»c factum* in comtiie- 
morationem virtutts. 

Eliam intravit in campUhl Seftlh trans aninem inter Esruaid et mare 
et fundavit ecclesiam Hlrtalth Argi et castra metatus est in campo Streth 
et invfenit quehdam vifum bonum de gehere Ldithron et babtltzavit eum 
et filium tenerum cuiti eo qui dicebatlir Itinu vfel IneuS quia pbsuit ilium 
pater in fana super cdlium ejus quia riatusest in via cum patre de monte ve- 
niens et babtitzavit Patricius filium et scrlpsit illi abgatdrium et benedixit 
eum benedictione episeopl qui postea retenuit As si cum sanctum cum mo* 
nachis suis in Ard Roissen id est Hirrath Congi in Campo Sereth in 
tempore regiim Fergusso et Fothuidet fundavit ecclesiam in campo Latrain 
et ecclesiam ftiagnam Sier Drommv quam tenuit lamilia Dairinse In Vo- 
burbur et porrexit Forburnas filiorum Conill in campo Itho et fundavit 
ibi aecclesiam magnam et exiit ad campum Tochuir et fecit aecclesiam ibi 
et in quo loco qui dam episcopus venit de genere Corcutheinme ad eum 
de cellola Toch in regionibus Terhenrigi Iceril contra solis occasum epis- 
copus cum sorore una monachi Patricii et est locus eorum ctim familla 
Clono et ingemescant viri loci illius. 

Fervenit Patricius per Sinonam tribus vicibus et septettt annos com- 
plevit in occidentali plaga et de campo Tochuir venit Indiito Ochetii et 
fecit septem ecclesias ibi. Et venit in Ardd Sir at ho et Mart £f£<e 
episcopum ordinavit et exiit in Ardd Eolergg et Ailgi et Lee Betidrigl 
et perrexit trans flumen Bandit et benedixit locum in quo est Cellola 
Cuile Railhin in Eilniu in quo fuit episcopus et fecit alias cellas multas 
in Eilniu. Et per Buas fluvium foramen pertulit et in Duin Sebuirgi 
sedit super petram quam petra Patricii usque nunc et ordinavit ibi Olca- 
num sanctum episcopum quern nutrivit Patricius et dedit illi partem de 

e 



XXX11 APPENDIX. 

episcopis ordinaret ibi et prespyteris et diaconis in ilia regione et bene- 
dixit Amolngid filium Fergussum fratrem Endi quia in agro ipsius virtu- 
tern fecit. 

Et ecce qui dam vir venit ad illos nomine Mace Dreg in cum filiis vif. 
gentilibus et postulavit babtismum dei a Patricio et benedixit ilium cum 
filiis et eligit unum (ilium ex ipsis cui nomen erat Mace Erae et scripsit 
elementa et benedixit eum benedictione patris. Et dixit pater filii teduit 
me si tecum exierit filius meus. Et ait Patricius non erit ita sed ilium 
Brono filio lent commendabo et Olcano. Extendit manum et indicavit 
ei locum in quo sunt ossa ejus procul et digito suo si go av it locum et 
crucem posuit ibi. Et ecce ii Alias venierunt ad Patricium et ace ipe runt 
pallium de manu ejus et benedixit illis locum super sylvam FochUthi. Et 
ecce Patricius perrexit ad agrum quod dicitur Foirrgea filiorum Amolr,- 
gid ad dividendum inter filios Amolngid et fecit ibi ecclesiam terrenam 
de humo quadratam quia non prope erat sylva. 

Et portavemrft ad ilium mulierem infirmam habentem in utero infan- 
tem et babtitzavit filium in utero matris aqua babtismi filii ipsa est aqua 
commonis muleris et sepelierunt earn in cacuminibus aecclesiae desuper et 
est pedes ipsi sancti juxta ecclesiam usque in presentem diem et edificavit 
recclesiam quandam apud familiam in sinu maris id est Ros filiorum Caitni. 

Et re versus est ad flumen Muiade Denectrige in Berlrigian et elvavit 
ibi lapidem in signaculum crucis Christi et dixit ecce hie invenietur aqua 
in novissimus diebus et babitabitur ame et fundavit ecclesiam juxta fossam 
Rigbairt et venit in Muiriscsain apud Bronum filium Icni et benedixit 
filium qui est Mace Rime episcopus et scripserunt elementa illi et Muir- 
ethacho episcopus qui fuit super flumen Bratho. 

Et venierunt trans litus Authnili in fines Irei Patricius et Bromn et 
cum illis filius Erae filii Dregin ad campum id est Ros Dregnige in quo 
loco est cassulus Broni et sedens ibi cecidit Patricii dens et dedit dentem 
Brono suo in relquias. 

Et dixit ecce mare jeciet nos de hoc loco innovissimis temporibus et 
exibitis ad flumen Slicicha: ad sylvam. 

Et exiit trans montem filierum Ailello et fundavit fecclesiam ibi 7Vrm- 
nach et Ehenach et Cell Angli et Cell Senchu/r. 



LIBER ARDMACIIJE VttA S. PATRICII. XXxiii 

Et exiit ad rfegiones talirigi Tretndige et feeit tfcclesiam juxta Drufln- 
Uas et babtitzavit hitiltos et 3rexit fid camptini Aitmaige et fundaVit 
eecclesiam ibi id est Domnach Ailmaige quia Patricius illic mansit tiribus 
diebus et tribus noctibus. 

Et pert-exit ad campum Aint et pbstlit ecclesiafti ibi et versus est Evdi 
et in campum Cethi et maledixit mimgn qliod dicittir Niger Drobfnicitm 
autem benedixit ih quo tehentur magni pisces sub pisciuin gen * * * 
eftectum est Fiumen Drtibiasco ttdn habuit ante pisces sed postea piscato- 
ribus fructum dat quia postulavit et nihil illi piscium dabaht sancto. 

Et maledixit aliis fluninibus id est flumini Oingte et Steli quia dimersi 
stint ii pueri da pueris Patricii in $teli qtiapropler hbc factum ih co m me- 
mo rati onem virtutls. 

Etiam intravit in campum Sefelh trans amnem inter Esrvaid et mare 
et fiindavit ecclesiam Htrralth Argi et castra metatus est in campo Stteth 
et ihvenit quehdahi virum botium de gene re Laithron et babtitzavit eum 
et filium teneriim cum eo qui dicebattir Ilinu vel IneuS quia pbstlit ilium 
pater in fana super collum ejus quia riatusest in via cum patre de monte ve- 
niens et babtitzavit Patricius filiunlet scrlpsit illi abgatbrium et benedixit 
eum benedictione episcopi qui postea retenuit Assicum sanctum cum mo* 
nachis suis in Ard Boissen id est Hirrath Congi in Campo Sereth in 
tempore re gum Fergusso et Fothuidet funddvit ecclesiam in campo Latrain 
et ecclesiam magnam Sier Drommo qudm tenuit familia Dairinse In J)o- 
burbur et porrexit Forburnas filiorum Conill in campo Itho et fundavit 
ibi aecclesiam magnam et exiit ad campum Tochuir et fecit ecclesiam ibi 
et in quo loco qui dam episcopus venit de genere Corcutheimne ad eum 
de cellola Toch in regiohibus Teriienrigi tceril contra solis occasiim epis- 
copus cum sorore una monachi Patricii et est locus eorum ctim familia 
Clono et ingemescant viri loci illius. 

Fervenit Patricius per Sinonitm tribus vfcibus et septeth* annos com- 
plevit in occidentali plaga et de campo !toihuif venit Jnduto Ochetti et 
fecit septem ecclesias ibi. lit venit in Ardd Slratho et Mace &fc<& 
episcopum ordinavit et exiit in Ardd Eotergg et Ailgi et Lee Bettdtigi 
et perrexit trans fiumen Bandce et benedixit locum in quo est cellola 
Cuile Bailhin in Eilniu in quo ftiit episcopus et fecit alias cellas fimltas 
in Eilniu. Et per Buas fluvium foramen pertulit et in Duin Setfuirgi 
sedit super pet ram quam petra Patricii usque nunc et ordinavit ibi Olca- 
num sanctum episcopum quern nutrivit Patricius et dedit illi partem de 

e 



XXXIV APPENDIX. 

reiiquiif Petri et Pauli et aliorum et velum quod custodivit reliquias et 
raversus est in campum Bltd et fecit reliquas multas ecclesias quas Cotn- 
diri habent. 

Ascendit autem ad montem Miss Boonrig quia nutrivit ibi filium 
Milam Maccubuam Gosackt nomine et filias duas eidem viri quando erat 
in servitute mi annorum et docuit illos in taciturnitate cum juramento 
pro timore magi sed alia nocte vidit magus Miliucc scintillas de ore SucceH 
fatui ignitas ascendentes in labia filii sui et inflammatum est totum corpus 
filii sui et de ore filii sui in ora sororum ejus. Cur inquit o serve malum 
fecisti filio meo in nocte quae preteriit. 

Respondit Succctus domine mi quid vidisti os filii mei replisti igne et 
filius meus labia filiorum replevit et consnmpti sunt omnes in cinerem et 
cinis eorum vivificavit multos et quasi aves volaverunt tecum et evome- 
runt in talia sua frustra. Respondit Succctus frustra vere evomerunt id 
demum magicam quia dedi in ora eorum verba dei mei excelsi. Et exiit 
ad montem Sdrte ad locum petre super quam vidit anguelum domini stan- 
tem et vestigium pedis illius usque nunc pene adest. Cum ascendisset in 
caelum pedibus extensis de monte ad montem dixitque. Ecce navis tua 
parata est surge et ambula. Venit vero sanctus per Doim in regionis 
Tuirtri ad CoUunt Patricii et babtitzavit filios Tuirtri. 

Relicta Machia venit in Maugdorru et ordinavit Victoricum Machi- 
nensem Episcopum et ecclesiam ibi magnam fundavit et perrexitad Loigai- 
rum et Conallum filios Neill. 

Finito autem circulo exiit et fecit ecclesiam Justano prius juxta 
Bile Tortin quaB est apud familiam Arddbreccain et fecit alteram Hitortena 
orientali in qua gens Othig Cirpani sed libera semper. 

Et perrexit ad fines Laginensiutn ad Druimen Hurchaille et posuit ibi 
domum Mctrtyrium quae sic vocatur quae sita est super viam magnam in 
valle. et est hie petra Patricii in via. Exiit ad campum Lifi et posuit ibi 
ecclesiam et ordinavit Auxilium puerum Patricii exorcistam et Eserni- 
num et Mactadeum in cellola Cuilin. Ordinavit Feccum album Isleibti et 
babtizabat filios Dunlinge et erexit se per Belut Gabrain et fundavit ec- 
clesiam Hirroigniu Martorthige et babtizabat filios Nioth Fruich Itcrnumce 
super petram Hicoithrigi Hicaissiul. 



LIBER ARDMACHiE VtTA S. PATRICII. XXXV 

Hm sunt tres petitiones Patricii ut nobis traditae sunt Hibernensibus 
rogans ut suscipiatur unusquisque nostram poenitentiam agens licet in 
extremo vitas sua? judicii die. 

Ut non claudetur in inferno hoc est prima. 

Secunda ne barbares gentes dominentur nobis in semper eternum. 

Tertia. Ut ne super vizerit aliquis nostrum id est Hibernensium ante 
septem annos ante diem judicii quia vii annos ante judicium delebuntur 
aequore hoc est tertia. 



iEtas Patricii ut nobis traditum est subputatur. 
vii anno babtizatus est xxx an legit 

x anno captus xxii ann. docuit 

iiii annis servivit JEtas ejus tota cxx. 



AN UT MOISES. 



In iiii rebus similis fuit Moisi Patricius. 

I. Primo. Anguelum de rubo audivit. 

II. xl diebus et xl noctibus jejunavit. 

III. Quia annos cxx peregit in vita presenti. 

IV. Ubi sunt ossa ejus nemo novit. 

Duo hostes xii diebus corpore Sancti Patricii contenderunt et noc- 
tem inter se xii diebus non viderunt sed diem semper et in xii die ad pre- 
Hum venerunt et corpus ingrabato ii hostes viderunt apud se et non pug- 
naverunt Colambcille spiritu sancto instigante ostendit sepulturam Patri- 
cii ubi est confirmat id est in Sabul Patricii id est in ecclesiam juxta mare 
pro undecima ubi est conductio martirum id est ostium Colutnbcille, de 
Britannia et conductio omnium sanctorum de Hibernia in die judicii. 



XIII. anno Theothosii Imperatoris a Celestino episcopo Papa Romas 
Patricius episcopus ad doctrinam Scotorum mittitur qui Celestinus xlii 
episcopus a Petro apostolo in urbe Romas. 



XXX VI APPENDIX. 

Palladius c pi scop us primo roittitur qui Patricias alio nomine appella- 
batur qui martyriura passus eat apud Scotos ut tradunt sancti antiqui. 
Deinde Patricius secundus ab angueli dei Victor nomine et Celestino 
papas mittitur cui Uibernia tota credidit qui earn pene totam babtizavit. 

Patricius sanctus episcopus honorem quaterna et omnibus monaster! is 
et eccle&iw per totam Hiberniam debet habere id est. 

1. Solemnitate dormitatienis ejus hooorari in medio veris autem iii dies 
et Ui noctes omni bono cibo prapter carnem quasi Patricius venissei 
in vita in hostium. 

IT. Offertoriiim ejus proprium in eodem die immolari. 

III. Yranum ejus per totum tempus cantare. 

IV. Canticum ejus Scotticum semper canere. 

Sic omnis quatuor ista habere debet et peddi a monaehis suis sibi qui 
ecclesiam fundavit vel monasterium et qui habet paruchiam et regiones 
mult as quatuor prediota habere debet in honore. 

Finit hoc breviarum gentis. 

Nominis documenti 

genelogie industriaB 

pueritie maledicti in peccatores 

captivitatum benedictiones in pios 

virtutum aetatis quae omnia in 

Christiane ser- deo gesta ab antiquis 

vitutis scitissimus adunata at- 

que collecta sunt. 



u i jii. « 



Incipient alia pauca serotinis temporibus inventa suisque locis nar- 
randa. Curiossitate heredum diligentiaque sanctitatis qua3 in honorem 
et laudem domini atque in amabilem Patricii memoriam usque in hodier- 
num diem congregantur. Quando autem Patricius cum sua sancta navi- 
gations ad Hiberniam pervenit Sanctum Lommanum in hostio Boindio 
navira custodire reliquit xl diebus et xl noctibus ac deinde alium quadra- 
gessimum post oboedentiam Patricio mans it deinde secundum imperium 
sui magistri in sua navi contrario flumine usque ad vadum Truim in hostio 
Arcis Fcdelmedo filii Loigairi domino gubernante pervenit. 



• •. 



LIBER ARDMACIIJS VITA S. PATRICII. XXXVIl 

Mane autem facto Foirtchemn filius Fedelmtheo invenit evangelium re- 
el tantem et ammiratas evangelium et doctrinam ejus confestim credidit et 
aperto fonte in illo loco a Lommano in Christo babtizatus est. Et mansit 
cum illo donee mater ejus qncrere eum peryenit et lncta facta est in 
conspectu ejus quia Britonissa erat. At file similiter credidit et iterum 
re versa est in domum suam et nuntiavit mari to suo omnia quae accederant 
illi et tilio suo ac vero Fedelmedius luctificabitur in adventu clerici quia 
de Brittonibus matrem habuit unam nliam regis Brittonum Scothnoesa lu- 
tavit autem Fedelmidius Lommanum lingua Britannica interrogans eum 
secundum ordinem de fide et genere. Respond it ei ego sum Lommanus 
Britto Christianus alumpnus Patricii episcoplqui missus est a domino bab- 
tizare populos Hibernetisium et convertere ad fidem Christi qui me missit 
hue secundum voluntatem dei statimque credidit Fedelmidius eum omni fa- 
mil ia suae t immolavitilli et Sancta Patricio regionem suam cum possessione 
sua et cum omnibus substantiis suis et cum omni progenie sua. Haec om- 
nia immolavit Patricio et Lommano Foirtcherno. filio suo usque in diem 
judicii. 

Migravit autem FodUmid trans amnem Boindeo et mansit in Cloin 
Lagen et mansit Lomrnan cum Foirtcherno in vado Truimm usque dum 
pervenit Patricius ad illos et edificavit aecclesiam cum ilKs xxii anno ante 
quam fundata etiam aecclesiam Altimachce. 

Progenies aihem Lommani de Britonnibus unum filium gellit. Ger- 
mana autem Patricii mater ejus germani autem Lommani hii sunt episcopi 
manis Iliforgnidiu Lacumniu. 

Broccaid in Tmbluich equorum apud Ciarrige Connact Broccanus 
Jmbrechmig apud nepotes Dorthim Mugenoc Weill Dumi Gluinn in deisdurt 
Breg. 

Haec autem piogenies Patricii propria est consanguinitate, et gratia 
fide et babtismate et doctrina et omnia quae adapta sunt de caetera de re- 
gionibus aecclesiis et omnibus oblationibus prapriis Sancto Patricio in 
sempiternum obtulerunt. 

Post aliquantum autem tempus adpropinquante Lommani exitu per- 
rexit cum alumpno suo Foirtcherno ad fratrem suum Broccidium fratrum 
salutandum perrexerunt autem ipse et alumpnus ejus Foirtchemn Com- 
mendavitque sanctam ecclesiam suam Sancto Patricio et Fowtchemo sed 
recussavit Foirtchemn tenere hereditatem patris suas quia obtutit deo et 



XXXV111 APPENDIX. 

Patricio nisi Lomnumut dixit non accipies benedict ionem meam nisi ac- 
ci peris principatuni ©ectasia? me» tenuit autem post obi turn magistri sui 
principatum tribus diebus usque dum pervenit ad vadum Trtdmm ac de- 
inde stalim Cathlaido Peregrino distribuit suam sscclesiam. Has sunt 
autem oblationes Fedelmedo filii Loigairi Saucto Patricio et Lommam* 
et Foirtckerno id est vadum Truhn in finibns Loigairi Breg igitur in 
finibus Loigari Medi. 

IIssc autem acclesiastica Conatt 

Progenies Ftddmtkeo Bmto* 

Foirtchernus Ossan 

Aod magnus Cummene 

Aod parvus Saran ■ 

Hii omnes episcopi fuerunt et principes veneranies Sanctum Pat ri- 
al et successores ejus piebilis autem progenies ejus hec est. 



cium 



Fergus filius Fedelmtheo Failnad filius Failain 

Feredach filius Fcrgosso ForfaUcd filius Failgnaith 

Cronan filius Foredig Segene filius Forfailto 

Sorran filius Cronain Sochnassack filius Segeni. 
Failan filius Sarain 



Sanctus Patrius iens ad ccElum mandavit totum fructum laboris sui tarn 
babtismatam causarum quam elemosinarum deferendum esse apostolic® 
urbi qute Scotice nominatur Arddmacha. Sic reperi in bibliothecis Scoto- 
rum. Ego scripsi id est Calvus Perennis in conspectu Briani imperatoris. 
Scotoram et quod scripsi fihituit pro omnibus regibus Mac l£ri<e.* 



Colmanus episcopus scclesiam suam id est Cluincain in Achud Patricio 
episcopo de votiva immolatione in sempiternum obtulit et ipse eum com- 
mendavit Sanctis viris id est prespitero Medb et prespitero Sadb. 



• This passage is in a more modern character than the text of the MS. The last 
two words I thought at first were forma Cerus ; bat, by means of a magnifying glass, 
I now have no doubt but that the above is correct. 



LIBER ARDMACHiE VITA S. PATR1C1I. XXXIX 

Ttemcampum aquilonis inter Gleoir et Ferni cum servis in eo sibi famu- 
lantibus filii Fieckrach Patricio in sempiternum ymmolaverunt. 

Item vii filii Doath Cluain Findglais et Imsrulh Cul Cais et Deruth 
Mar Culecais et Cenn locho deo et Sancto Patricio fideliter obtulerunt. 

FiKi item Conlaid viii campi pondera id est vaccas campi viii in here- 
ditate sua id est Cachindlea Odibcarnib usque ad montem Cairnn deo et 
Patricio in sempiterna saecula obtulerunt. 

Has omnes oblationes Ciarrichi super in eorum reges Patricio per 
sterna saecula obtulerunt. 

Sanctus Patricius familiam suam in regione Ciarrichi per spiritum 
sanctum praevidens eum esse undique Cassatam id est episcopum Sachellum 
et Brocidium et Loarnum et prespiterum Medb et Ernas cum in unitatem 
pacis aeternce cum uno fidei ritu sub potestate unius haeredis suae apostolicae 
cathedrae Altimachm sub benedictione sua unanimiter conjunxit. 

Binean filius Lugni scriba atque sacerdos necnon anchorita filius filia? 
Lugaith in netach fuit qui dedit deus progenies matris suae hereditatem in 
qua fundavit aecclesiam deo consecratam Patricioque immolatam et Sanctus 
Patricius signavit locum sibi suo baculo et ipse primus corpus et sangui- 
nem Christ! obtulit post quod gradum accessit Bineanus ab eo et benedixit 
ilium et reliqui.t post se in suo loco. 

Veniens Patricius in finem Calrigi babtizavit filium Cairthin et Caicha- 
num et postquam babtitzavit obtulerunt filius Cairthir et Caichan quintam 
partem Caichain deo et Patricio et liberavit rex deo et Patricio. Hse 
sunt fines quintae partes i. e. Coicid Caichain Otha glais Tdchce Berich Abra- 
idne Conrici Forcuirin Tuelgos Disleb Otha glais Conacolto Curreirui et 
Otha Criche Drommonit Cuglais TatnlachUe Dublocho Lag glais Cugrenlaich 
Fotelareut Timmchett Nasanto Cosescen Indacor Asescum dacor Ladescert 
Lenilafer Conricinucht Nomomne Condairiumor Condairiu Medoin Condai- 
riu fidas Condairiu Mail Condruim Toidached Laglais Conrici ConacUd 
Atropcrt Flaith et Aithcch into hmle Hosuch Lartabuirt Bait his Duarb. 



Xl APPENDIX. 

Coijss^b Pdcjtjcc JapnajD pntu; itvo|w?ttiJi) -&6\io 
.). -Djtvrtti Ijdt )rdCdbP4'C|\icc-d'Ddlcde.i). 7berjJ3rjuf 
4djrjttl dsut T^WTfc xuii djtjsf 3<*bdjr cdjlle Id 
Pardee Idtt^t* IQSSQ 4I J 1F ol «)jte x>jcer)jul cdjcdjij 
bdjd-oe dip cdjter; .Jfj- bejrj3Jt) ttyJTJcwj bljd*Drje. 

)XX) WT° coibxe yeto tJo 7 Ae-oocx: -Djbljd-ojrj 
fienjbdt -odii T>utf)drjc>?b *Djto»iitio ljdf 7 -DUtrjdjijb 
cdll|t)3) jc ctxocdjt]3ftl 7 dlt;oj(\ x>\ion\n\o ljdf t)d*o 
cot]TF;l tjtjecdt fotvDfinttjjt) ledf dec cetjel t$ro ?jo 
njdbeji i)oc b5^tt]d;r x>ub bet c|\djbr>5c bet c>?btec 

-DJTJCld)!)^ ttJd!JJ|t§ -DUCCtdt) T>ljt JIJ *Cd(\ < DJlf1W)t;j|l 

-ojiottittio r -ojdttidtjcjb 2t)d!)jgcd|i -oubbeji T>jc|\irD 
-Djttjnrjcjji Pdrjtjcc jtj^fc- 

Nao et iVa/ filii fratris Patricii et Daall filius Hencair quos reliquit ibi 
Patricius Adopart TeoraUth Indti Treathir Patricio in sempiternum et 
obtulit Patricio nlium suum Con&erc filius Daaf. 

Jlfarti obtulit Teoralethindli Trialhir et obtulit Patricio nlium itfac 
Rimce et babtitzavit eos Patricius et rodificavit tecclesiam in hereditate 
eorum et re gnu m ofterebat cum eis Coirpri Patricio. 

Jttijtdjf)) efttjerje r>o cuttjtf) ) 7 z>o dlje 7 *>o ejtrj j?j cjji 
3)rt]ttide7tfint)ebudcdele7 , nditiit))cJtt]ttifid)t)tdT:jr)t)d 
rjj.cdjllecdto jijdcjpeto'DuPd'cttjcd cutlde jtj.bixdro. 

^Tl vo 33 e l cuttitijer) d3Ut bp^edtj oczzep t)dcj*o 
Cor)dtejtbTtetfpjT>7 ttjd37let)U co fjdtljttf 7 dUttb3oj\c. 
03*ojlet ^J t>ucuttjj If t jtjT>Ofltjto it) *oojtfj jrj^wtrjm 
cotjpjccdtfdji &\%y?G tpje 5. jtj ut)3dj 4fi3drc7 cjidtj 
dti3jc d3U t trjvyrjce .jtj f]ur)3decorjt>poc5jji terjffjetJb 
tetjdjjtocjb 103 lejr urj3de x>jtrjucdjb 7 to3 tejc tirade 
TjcdJttjb 7 -ojUdt: lejt ut)3de tetjttjernb W° Vite 
x>jfec cjtjojl t>J3ejrj cutijtrjet) C£t;dJ3 jijcde tftjeld-odc 
rij rtjdjle cope r^eitrje cp^njtjtje djiec .t). rorj pjrde 
jtjcectJn W col ^4n,Tjdttib(i§T;dr) ^curqjl T).dt\33jcl>7t5 
jrj cuttidttt) xmtorjtos ocrjp dcjr>. 

Patricius et Iserninus cum Germano fuerunt in Olsiodra civitate. Ger- 
manus vero Jsernino dixit ut praedicare in Hiberniam veniret atqne prump- 
tus fuit obaedire etiam in quamcumque partem mitletur nisi in Hibsrniam 
Germanus dixit Patricio et tu an oboediens eris. 



LIBER ARDMACH^E — VITA S. PATRICII. xli 

Patricius dixit fiat sicut vis Germanus dixit hoc inter nos erit et no* 
potuerit Iserninus in Hibernia pec transire. 

Patricius venit in Hibemiam Iscmini vero missus est in-aliam regioaem 
sed ventus contrarius detulit eum in dextram partem Hibernice. 

<t)uc£c jd^nn x>jdcetjdT>jc djctqe becc jclju c6c 

wse ^ajnttun ^uUnio ■djpw» cotjcot)3db cojcnie 

fdcdb t)6jb rjd ttiv?i)rj(t dtp 1ujt> jd|\p?-Dju cotjcoij- 
3db ltd)* ?odldfcjc?dcjb tjojb .tj, djle JT>?x>ju tmtln'o 
T>Jf YfT>)U t>& Idtjtuc X>ddJldT> jtyojb ttjdjjjb. 

^ullocdjt cucjitopju reccn|d)cc cdcboc ppj-o- 
cjf x>udjb 7 crediderunt et baptizalesant 7 h?r> leo 
fd-cer -ojdttjttjetjur ipuxoc^c erjx>de cetjfdldc ^ubjrjtj 
cttejcjtje fijdcdc In'o eprcop y)i leo ?o[Uotj3Jt cdc 
dl§£ ox>jb |\dt}>c Pdrjijcc jepproju et credederunt 
sibi dt) filii 4>urjljt]3e b?*> Jdprn'oju cu Cftjjt)*dtt| 
2t)c ijeij*>j cejtjf eljc 7 ipse credidit. Uccjtdjf; bjljc 
4jlTJ3 lt4r|\icc JdittjubdjicreT) dfidcdjlce-o it)dccu 
cdibdT) et Iseririsnum, leo 7 dT> covex)de wv^e. 

<Dullord]t itjdjec cdtbdx> -ojdttjnjet) ijut; JetiTW 
jf x>e dccdd ?§i)d'poti'pjT> Cotjcutedcdji x>ocutt) Pd- 
•gjijcc er cji£it|£w it) etpj ttcfcj pdrjijc, 

Ad opum Crimthann jtt) et)r>joj*Dj jttj xml bj3fijejtj 
150^4^ 03dbnt^ Ijpluf cor\\i)Cux T>roe Idjseq rleccjx) 
JfT^PtJJflWir t>u Pdcpjcc ?ot)dttjdncj 7 ddtjx>oojt; 7 
•oubbejji pdcjijcc T>uepfcop ^jr er -odbetirvrsfc 'outtj- 
dccdjb cdtbdc 7Cot)3d)b ledrlju-dr^jcoc. 

<t>ulh?T> Pdcjt)cc orettjnt* tycujc Ldjseij cotftidtj- 
Cdi;dfi7^ubt;dcflidcculu3;fi uccDottjrjuc ttjdjt epj- 
didji Id etjtjj cetjteljc 21 Ijrr Pdcjijcc -oubcdc 
jttj*odtjjtjde tj. eprcnp 'old < cer£Jpljb PJldJ3tjjb jx>otj 
-pep iroeji xoce\t\Yt\ cex\ox\ cetjdjtjtt] tjd-ojppu becc 
i)d*Djptiottjd(i ber>dtott)tt|de. 

'CojfcljtjJtii )?ejt 6ji)t2^ce xmtfdflwcrde dcx;x>etj- 
ci?rcju T^JTS^CDUbcdc t)j ?%Goyx<x Ttfttjttjntjrjji 
dec fjdec fjtjx> T>jldJ3tjJb tucooj-q Tjudjttjfe Ijjcjpe 
cotjdec 2ltt) Ijtjttvtyojtdjrre cotjdcdcdp fjdec ?jt)p 
cuccu 2lf bejix; -oubtdc ft 1 J pdepjee rdj|v x>utt)beji 
Hdx>fd djji initi)itere ;t)KP wittjtijjii) X)j*otjddx) x>ud- 

beti^^'o tditftjuceij dj^rtn^n ^sojite jr^no^u 

yufitdit fjdec ipjij^ x>ubrdc 7 bett^wf Pdcpjcc 7 

f 



Xlil APPENDIX. 

bdjzYJUY) ^Dubbejir sitdx> .q. epf cojp k?ojj\ cotq-ce 
epfcop jijfJiJ c;cd|tuo7ficqe a D ldld?3qju 7 'oub beta; 
Pdcttjcc Cutqcdc ruipjdcc j*ooq clocc 7 iqeqfrjji 7 
bdcdll 7 pool) ft e er ?dcdb tqojiref eji Idjr x>jdtqnq- 
cjji .j. tqucdc6cc ttjf e ?4jL 

Slusufcjq jqfeo bjcde c6c4q x>jd|\tqv?r qdjq?>ro 
pool f)x>e\tt\ro. 

Coi)3db jditproju jqx>oiqquc fejccecbdj aq-o 
coqroftc^r^ cpjipjcjc -peji <D;diqv?q^/lt Idjf dqx> rjfjt) 
x>uUnt; jqcdjqsel cue; dqx> dfbe|ic ?jijf jf W^bjq 

dt);4jt drd cer^ns* i)icv?i ttjdjse djittqrpnpiTcjr 

jqrojtcc ditjtqbdT>dqx> TU|\it>Ttt)rjr 2lpi*djqrec pope 

tymnrwr rt«tt« 4 jtt)bdT>dij*D ru;pu;tnr)r dijoc^r 

drbejtc fjdec rtvPQ4Ji)5*l q^q^WSd-D Coqcjrex> 
pdrjijcc roto jiuq-odlnc Idjr 7 'Djdcojroqid'D 7 
Cottjbet) \)uS-o pussdbdx) dlocc x>ull>?x> fgrufoju 
pdt^ijcc cupjdec 7 T>utijqx> dlocc let 7 cucroc;4 7 

rowntn dipointis .tj. dtj-o dsur d to^ius qtjtqcdq 

jqpojicrjq ru pdepjee d|\bd pdcjijc T>|ibgttc bdjijr 
xrficltjtqtuitq 7 jtteb — dx>juiq dec Cjijtqrdij. 

Ia?t> rocqdU Jdjicdjq -ducuuji r^S*^ pdcjtjcc 
jiqcd|ipdc bojeldjf x>j yjt)T>uy:oiz> pdepjee jqcdftpdr 
cufocqdll c$qdtijc .q. dqx> dec djqsjl -out: p w*>4 
Ipoj-ojur r°cqdll ojuidq .jq. djC3J dqx> Ivfr cu tqdq- 
cdq 7 dq .jq. djrj) ldp?x>e f ojrfjf j-oe cufjdec 
-Diotqjf ?jdcc x>ojb idfipqicS jtqtqeloc^jtqtqudqoc- 
Ijf Tucpl coq^putic jqcdjq3el Jr-oujcpu cucdD 6 
Pdcpjcc 6 qurjcjti x>ulob|\;. 

Bpfcop dex> b6j jrl g Jbcj 1\?t>t>u4t>t> iqdcde bjpc 
ex>occ cure3§qe x>ud t\T>T>tqdc$ T>ubb§jtc fe3eqe 
ojcejipoc djr>dcc t>u4jt> 7 d-oopdjic d§x> djr>dcc 7 
2lc$q§l 7 ^ ocljt w pir|\)cc cub by&i ?^ c 4b dex> 
dj-odcr Id coqcdx>. 

Iat© coqed-o x>udfvniqdcde coqrubdttc ?ldqx> 
feblde dcejll t>6o 7 3dbr J cd T>erpq dbbdje. % 

Finiunt haec pauca per Scotticam inperfecto scripta non quod ego non 
potuissem Romana condere lingua sed quod vix in sua Scotia hae fabula? 
agnosci possunt sin autem alias per Latinam degestae fuissent non tam in- 
certus fuisset aliquis in eis quam imperitus quid legisset aut quara linguam 
sonasset per habundantiam Scotaicorum nominum non habentium quali- 
tat em. 



ANNOTATIONES AIDI. xliii 

Scripsi hunc ut potui librum pulsare conetur 
Omiris quicumque legerit at evadere poena 
Ad caelum valeam et ad summi praemia regni 
Patricio dominum pulsante kabitare per aevum. 



ANNOTATIONES AIDI. 



Quam quidem mi domine Aido multi conati sunt ordinare narrationem 
utique istam secundum quod patres eorum et qui ministri ab initio fuerunt 
sermones tradiderunt illis sed propter difficillimum narrationis opus di- 
versasque opiniones et plurimorum plurimas suspiciones numquam ad 
unum certumque historiae tramitem pervenerunt ideo ni fuller juxta hoc 
nostrorum proberbium ut deducuntur pueri in ambiteathrum in hoc peri- 
culosum et profundum narrationis Sanctae Pylagus turgentibus proterve 
gurgitum aggeribus inter acutisimos Carubdes per ignota sequora in sitos 
a nullis ad hue lintribus excepto tantum uno patris mei cognito si expec- 
tum atque occupatum ingeni olim ei puerilemremi cymbam deduxi sed ne 
magnum de parvo videar finguere pauca haec de mult is Sancti Patricii 
gestis parva peritia incertis auctoribus memoria labili attrito sensii vili 
sermone sed affect u pissimo caritatis etiam sanctitatis tuae et auctoritatls 
imperio oboedens carptim gravatimque explicare aggrediar. 

De ortu Patricii et ejus prima captivitate. 

De navigio ejus cum gentibus et vexatione diserti cibo sibi gentilibus di- - 

vinitus de lato. 
De secunda captura quam senis decies diebus ab inimicis pretulerat. 
De susceptione sua a parentibus ubi agnoverunt eum. 
De etate ejus quando iens videre sedem apostolicam voluit discere sapien- 

tiam. 
De inventione sancti generis in Galliis et ideo non exivit ultra. 
De state ejus quando visitavit eum anguelus ut veniret adhuc. 
De reversione ejus de Gallis et ordinatione Palladii et mox morte ejus. 
De ordinatione ejus ab Amatho rege episcopo defuncto Palladio. 
De rege gentili habito in Temoeria quando venerat Sanctus Patricius 

babtismum portans. 
De primo ejus itinere in hac insola ut seipsum redemeret Miliucc pri- 

usquam alios a demonio traheret. 
De morte Milcon et verbo Patricii de semine ejus. 
De consilio Sancti Patricii ubi Hessitutp est. 
De celebratione primte Pascse. 



APPENDIX. xllV 

De oblatione prim! Pasca in hac insola facta. 

De festivitate gentili in Temorla eadem noctc qua Sanctus Patricius Pasca 

adoravit. 
De gressu regis Loigarii de Temoria ac Patricimn in node Pases. 
De vocatione Patricii ad regem et fide Eire filii Dsgo raorte magi in ilia 

nocte. 
De ira regis et suorumad Patricium et plaga dei super eos et transfinctione 

Patricii coram gentilibus. 
De adventu Patricii in die Pasot ad Temoriam et flde JDubthach Moccu- 

lugir. 
De conflictu Patricii adversus magum in ilia et arirabitibns virtutibus. 
De conversion* Loigari regis et conversio et de verbo Patricii de regno 

ejus post se. 
De doctrina et babtismate signisque sancti Patricii secundum exemplunv 

Christi. 
De Mace Cuill et conversione ejus ad verbum Patricii. 
De morte Moneiitn. 

De fabula Dairi et ©quo et oblatione Arddmacha ad Patricium. 
De gentibus laborantibut die dominica trans preceptnm Patricii. 
De fructifera terra in salsuginem versa ad verbum Patricii. 
De morte MoneisenSaxonitsc. 
De eo quod Sanctus Patricius vidit ccelum apertum et filium dei et 

anguelos ejus. 
De conflictu Sancti Patricii adversum Coirthech regem Aloo. 
Htsc pauca Sancti Patricii peritia et virtutibus Muirchu Maccum&chtheni 

dictante Aiduo Sleptiensis civitatis Episcopo conscripsit. 



Patricio Sancto episcopo summus domini sacerdos anguelus debitam 
reverentiam cathedrae su® apostolic© honoremque propriam sue heredis 
ab omnibus Scotis traditam sapienter a deo sibi dictavit. 



LIBER ANGUELI INCIPIT. 



Quodam itaque Sanctus Patricius de Altimachct urbe ad muHitudines 
utriusque sexus humani generis babtizandas docendas atque sanandas 
juxta fontem in orientali predicts urbis parte prope Hereutem pie per* 
rexit. 



LIBER ANGELI. xlv 

Et ibi ante lucem roultas undique ad noticiaro fidei canftuentes expecta- 
vit subito ergo euro sopor prostravit eo quod priua pro Ckristo vigfliia 
nocturni fessus fuisset, 

£t ecce tarn cito venit anguetas ad emu de caelo et excitavit eum leviter 
de sompno et dixit Sanctus Patricius ego adsum numquid inique gessi 
nuper in conspectu altissimi si accidit veniam peto a deo. 

Respondit an gel us non sed missit me summus omnipotens ad te primus 
ad animi tui coaservationem post conversionem Hibernensium per te ad 
se in fidem quos ei adquessisti per darissimum laborem et per tuam valde 
predictionem gratia spiritu sancti lucidissimam universis gentibus fruc- 
tuossam cum esses semper laboriosus multis temporibus in multis periculis 
a gentilibus per frigus et aestatem essuriens et sitiens de ambulans impigei 
quotidie de gente in gentem ad utilitatem multarum gentium scit ergo 
Dominus deus tnum presentem locum quern presto videmus in alto posi 
turn cum parva cellula angustum ab aliqnlbus quoque regiones habitato- 
ribus coartatum et suburbana ejua non sufficient cunctis ad refugium 
idcirco constituitur terminus a domino vastissimus urbi Altimachas quam 
dilexlsti pre omnibus Hibernensium telluribus id est a pinna montis 
Berbicis usque ad montem Miss a monte Miss usque ad Brierigi a Brierigi 
usque ad dorsos Breg certe si volueris erit hujus magnitudinis Ac deinde 
donavit tibi dominus deus universal Scotorum gentis in modum paruchias 
et huic urbi tuse que cognominatur Scotorum lingua Arddmadue. 

Dixit Sanctus Patricius prostrata facie deorsum in conspectu angueli. 
Gratias ago deo meo domino sempiterno qui dignatus eat tantam gloriam 
donare dementia famulo suo. 

Item sanctus dixit quosdam tamen electos sancte domine.mi per spiri- 
tum sanctum prevideo in hac insola per inefiabilem turn dementias piata- 
tem et per predicatinnis tu» laborem orateros mihi caros quasi proprios 
corporis mei editos tibi quoque amicos devote servitores qui autem 
videntur indegere aliquid sibi proprie diocessis ad utilitatem necessarian 
famulationis aeccleaiis seu monasteriis suis post me idcirco perfecte et 
juste debeo adeo habundantis donationem mihi certe deditam dimittere 
commoniter perfectis Hibernie religiosis ut et ego et ipsi divitiis bonitatis 
dei pacifice perfruemur hoc universa a mihi concessa caussa divines cari- 
tatis. 

Item ait nonne ergo mihi sufficit quicquid devote noverunt ac volue- 



Xlvi APPENDIX. 

runt Christiani homines offeree de regionibus atque oblationibus suis per 
arbitriom sua? libertatis. 

Item nonne utique contentus sum esse apostolicus doctor et dux prin- 
cipalis omnibus Hiberionacum gentibus presertim cum peculiare censum 
retineo recte reddendum et a summo mihi etiam illud est donatum vere 
decanter debitum super liberas provinciarum hujus insole provincial 
et universis cynubitanum similiter monasteriis sine ulla dubitatione jus 
decretum erit rectori Arddmacha inperpetuum. 

Receptio archiepiscopi heredis cathedrae me* urbis cum comitibus 
suis numero 50 exceptis peregrinis et infirmis ^ototibus variis atque in 
p rob is et ceteris sit digna refectio aptaque unicuique eodem numero tarn 
digne in die quam certe similiter in nocte. 

In ista vero urbe Altimachee homines Christiani utriusque sexus reli- 
giossi ab initio fidei hucusque penem seperabiliter commorari videntur 
cui vero predict® tres ordines adherent virgines et paenitentes in matri- 
monio legit imo ecclesis servientes. 

Et his tribus ordinibus audire verbum predictionis in secclesia aquilo- 
nalis plagae conceditur semper diebus dominicis. 

In australi vero bassilica episcopi et presbiteri et anchoritae accclesias 
et casteri religiossi laudes sapidas offerunt. 

De speciali reverentia Arddmachce et honore prassulis ejusdem urbis 
dicamus. 

Ista quippe civitas summa et libera a deo est constituta et ab anguelo 
dei et ab apostolico viro Sancto Patricio episcopo specialiter dedicata. 

Praeest ergo quodam privilegio omnibus ecclesiis ac monasteriis 
cunctorum Hibernensium vel supera auctoritate summi pontificis illius 
fundatoris. 

Nihilhominus venerari debet honore summo rum martyrium Petri et 
Pauli Siefani Lawrendi et caeterorum. 

Quanto magis quoque valde veneranda atque diligenter ab omnibus 
veneranda honoranda. 



LIBER ANGELI. xlvii 

Pro sancta ammiratione nobis beneficii per omnibus inerrabiiis quod 
in ea secritia constitutione exstat sacratissimus sanguis Jesu Christi re- 
demptoris humani generis in sacro lintiamine simul cum sanctorum reli- 
quiis in aecclesia australi ubi requiescunt corpora sanctorum peregrino- 
rum de longue cum Patricio transmarinorum csterorumque justorum. 

Idcirco non licet causa predicts auctoritatis ejus illam mittere con- 
sortem ab ulla aecclesia Scotorum neque ab ullo prsesule vel abbate 
contra hseredem illius sed a se recte supra juratur supra omnes ecclesias 
et illarum antistites si vera necessitas poposcerit. 

Item omnis aecclesia* libera et civitas ab episcopali gradu videtur esse 
fundata in tota Scotorum insola et omnis ubique locus qui dominicus ap- 
pelatur juxta clementiam almipotentis domini sancti doctoris et juxta 
verbum angueli in speciali societate Patricii pontificis atque h&redis 
cathedrae ejus Aird Machce esse debuerat quia donavit illi deus totam 
insolam ut supradiximus. 

Item scire debemus omnis monachus uniuscumque ecclesiae si ad Pa- 
tricium reverterit nondenegat proprium monachi votum maxime si ex con- 
sensu abbatis sui prions devoverit. 

Itaque non vituperandus neque excommunicandus quicumque ad ec- 
clesiam ejus perrexerit caussa amoris illius quia ipse judicabit omnes Hi- 
be menses in die magno terribilis judicii in presentia Christi. 



Item de honore praesulis Airddmachce episcopi presidentes cathedrara 
pastor is prefecti. 

Si ipse predictus pontifex ad vesperum pervenerit loco quo receptus 
fuerit prebeatur ei uniali vice refectionis digns consulatione predictorum 
hospitum numero c. cum pabulis suis illorum jumentis praeter hospites et 
infirmos et eos qui jectant infantes super eecclesiam et csteros seu repro- 
bos et alios. 

Item qui non receperit predictum pnesulem in hospitiiim eundem et 
recluserit suam habitat«onem contra ilium vii ancellas suas vii annos poe- 
nitentia? similiter reddere cogatur. 



xlviii APPENDIX. 

Item quicomque contempserit aut molaverit insignia consecrata 
ejmdem agii id est Patricii duplicia solvet. 

Si vero de contemptu alio rum insignium reddita fuerit duas ancellas de 
consecratis lummi predict! doctoris Patricii redditur. 

Item quicumque similiter per industriam atque injuriam vel nequitiam 
malum quod que opus contra familiam seu paruchiam ejus perficeritaut pre- 
dicta ejus insignia dispexerit ad libertatem examinis ejusdem Airddmach* 
presulis recte judicantis perveniet causa totius negotionis ceteris aliorum 
judicibus prfetermissi*. 

Item quccumque causa valde diffictiis exor ta ftterit atque ignotacunc- 
tis Scotoruni gentium judicibus ad oathedram arohieptscopi Hibernensuun 
id est Patricii atque hujus antistitis examinationem recte referrenda , 

Si vero in ilia cum suis sapientibus facile sanari non potent trlis causa 
proedicta negotionis ad sedem apostolicam decrevimus esse mittendam id 
est ad Petri apostoli catbedram auctoritatem Roma urbis finem. 

Hii sunt qui de hoc dec re ve runt id est Auxi&us Patricias Secundums 
Bcni gnus post vero exitum Patricii Sancti alumpni sui valde ejusdem libros 
conscripserunt. 

Fundamentum orationis in unaquaque die dourinica in AltornacJue ad 
sargifagum martyrum ad euudem ab eoque revertendum id est Domine 
clamavi ad te usque finem. 

XJt quid deus repulisti in finem et beati inmacculati usque in finem 
benedictionis et xii Psalmi graduum. Finit. 

Inter Sanctum Patricium Hibernensium Brigitamque Columpnas ami- 
citia caritatis merat tanta ut unum cor consiliumque haberent ununi Chris- 
tus per ilium illamque virtutis multis peregit. 

Vir ergo Sanctus Christian® Virgini ait. 

O mea Brigita paruchia tua in proviucia tua apud reputabitur monar- 
chiam tuam in parte autem oriental! et occidental! dominatu in mea erit. 



SANCTI PATRICII CONFESSIO, 

SIVE 

EPISTOLA AD HIBERNOS. 



INCIPIUNT LIBRI SANCTI PATRICII EPISCOPI. 

Ego Patricias peccator rusticissimus et minimus omnium fidelium et 
contemptibilis sum apud plurimos patrem habui Calpornium Diaconum, 
filium quondam Potiti Presbyteri filii Odissi qui fuit in Vico Banna- • 
venn Taberniee. Yillulam enim prope habuit ubi ego capturam 
dedi. Annorum erara tunc fere xvi. Deum verum ignorabam, et 
Hiberione in Captivitate adductus sum, cum tot millia hominura secun- 
dum merita nostra quia a Deo recessimus et precepta ejus non custodivi- 
mus, et sacerdotibus nostris non obedientes fuimus, qui nostram salutem 
admonebant et Dominus induxit super nos iram animationis suae et 
dispersit nos in gentibus multis etiam usque ad ultimum terras ubi nunc 
parvitas mea esse videtur inter alienigenas. Et ibi Dominus aperuit 
sensum incredulitatis mead ut sero rememorarem - delicta mea ut confir- 
firmarem toto corde ad Dominum Deum meum qui respexit humilitatem 
meam et misertus est adolescentis et ignorantis mes et custodivit me 
antequam scirem eum et antequam saperem vel distinguerem vel bonum 
et malum et munivit me et consolatus est mei ut pater filium. 

Unde autem tacere non possum neque expedit quidem tanta beneficia 
et tantam gratiam quam mihi dignatus in terra captivitatis mea? quia haec 
est retributio mea nostra ut post correptionem vel agnitionem Dei 
exaltare et confiteri mirabilia ejus coram omni natione quae est sub omni 
coelo quia non est alius Deus nee unquam fuit nee ante nee erit post hunc 
prater Deum Patrem ingenitum sine principio a quo est omne principium 
omnia tenentem (ut diximus) et ejus filium Jesum Christum qui cum 
Patre scilicet semper fuisse testamur ante originem seculi spiritualiter 
apud Patrem inarrabiliter genitum ante omne principium et per ipsum 

g 



1 APPENDIX. 

facta sunt visibilia hominem factum morte devicta in ccelis. Et dedit 
ilii omnem potestatem super omne nomen, ccelestium et terrestrium et in- 
fernorum, et omnis lingua confiteatur et, quia Dominus et Deus est Jesus 
Ckristus queni credimus et expeetamus adveutum moz futurum Judex 
vivorum atque mortuorom qui reddet unicuique secundum facta sua et 
e Audit in nobis abunde Spirit urn Sanctum donum et pi gnus immortalitatis 
qui facit credentes et obedientes ut sint filii Dei et cohaeredes Christi quern 
confitemur et adoramus unum Deum in Trinitate sacri nominis. Ipse enim 
dixit per Prophetam — Invoca me in die tribulationis hue, et Uberabo tc, et 
magnificabis me. Et iterum inquit, Opera autem Dei revelare et confiteri 
honorifieum ut. Tamenetsi in multis imperfectus sum, opto fratribus et 
cognotatis meis scire qualitatemmeam, ut possint perficere votum animae 
meae. Non ignoro testimonium Domini mei qui in Psalmo testatur Perdes 
eos qui loquuntur mendacium et iterum inquit Os quod mentitur occidit ani- 
mam. Etidem Dominus Verbum otiotum quod locuti fiterint homines reddent 
rationem deeoin diejudicn. Unde autem vehementer cum timore et tre- 
jnore metuere hanc sententiam in die ilia ubi nemo se potent subtrahere 
vel absconders sed omnes omnino reddituri sumus rationem, etiam pecca- 
torum minimorum ante tribunal Christi Domini. 

Quapropter olim cogitavi scribere sed et usque nunc hesitavi. Timup. 
enim ne inciderem in linguam hominum. Quia non dedici sicut et caeteri 
qui optime itaque jure et sacras li teres utroque pari raodo combiberunt * 
et sermones illorum ex infantia nunquam motarunt sed magis ad perfectum 
semper addiderunt. Nam sermo et loqnela nostra translata est in linguam 
alienam, sicut facile potest probari ex salivaf Scriptunemee,qualiter sum 
ego in Sermonibus instructus atque eruditus quia inquit Sapiens per 
linguam dinossitur et sensus etscientia etdoctrina veritatis. Sed quidpro- 
dest excusatio juxta veritatem presertim cum pr&sumptione ? quatinus 
modo ipse adpeto in senectute mea, quod in juventute non comparavi 
quod obstiterunt ut connrmarem quod ante perlegeram. Sed si quis me 
credidit ? Et si dixero(quod ante praefatus sum)adolescens immopene puer 
imberbis capturam dedi antequam scirem quid peterem vel quid ad pete - 
rem vel quid vitare debueram. Unde ergo hodie erubesco et vehementer 
protimeo denudare imperitiam meam quia non possum de decritisj brevitate 
sermoneexplicare nequeo. Sicut enim Spiritus gestit et animus et sensus 
monstrat affect us. Sed si itaque datum mini fuisset sicut et ceteris 
veruntamen non silerem propter retributionem. Etsi forte videtur apud 



* Incertus liber hie. + Ibid. J Ibid. 



SANCTI PATRICII CONFESSIO. li 

aliquant os me in hoc proponere cum mea inscientia et tardiori lingua. 
Sed scriptum est Lingua balbuticntes vdociUr discent loqui paccm : quanta 
raagis nos adpetere debemus qui sumus nos Ephtola Christi in salutem 
usque ad ultimum terra: etsi non diserta sed ratum et fortissimum 
scriptum in cordibus vestris non atramento sed Spiritu Dei trivi. Et iterum 
testatur Et rusHcaiionem ab Altissimo creata est. 

Unde ego primus rusticus perfuga indoctus scilicet qui nescio in pos- 
terum providere : sed illud prescio certissime quia utique priusquam hu- 
miliarer ego eraiu velut lapis qui jacet in luto profundo et veniens qui 
potens est et in sua misQricordia sustulit me et quidem scilicet sursum ad- 
leva vit et collocavit me in sua parte et inde fortiter debueram exclamare 
ad retribuendum quoque aliquid Domino pro tantis beneficiis ejus hicet 
in mternum qua? mens hominum estimare non potest. Unde autem ad- 
miramini magni et pusilli et vos dominicati qui timetis Denm Rhetorici 
auditi et scrutamini quis me stultum excitavit de medio eorum qui viden- 
tur esse sapientes et leges periti et potentes in sermone et in omni re et 
me quidem detestabiles hujus mundi de ceteris inspiravit si talis essem. 
Dummodo autem ut cum metu et reverentia et sine querela fideliter genti 
ad quam charitas Christi transtulit et donavit me in vita mea si vivus fuero 
denique ut cum humilitate et veraciter deservirem illis. 

In mensura itaque fidei Trinitatis oportet distinguere sine reprehen- 
sione perculi notum facere donum Dei et consolationem aeternam sine 
timore fidutialiter Dei nomen ubique expandere ut etiam post obi turn 
meum* ex a Gallias relinquere fratribus et filiis meis quos in Domino 
ego baptizavi tot milia hominum. Et non erara diguus neque talis ut 
hoc Dominus servulo suo concederet post aerumnas et tantas moles' post 
captivitatem post annos multos in gentem illara tantam gratiam mihi 
donaret quod ego aliquando in juventute mea nunquam speravi neque 
cogitavi. 

Sed postquam Hiberione deveneram quotidie itaque pecora pascebam 
et frequens in die orabam magis ac magis accedebat amor Dei et timor 
ipsius et fides augebatur et spiritus augebatur ut in die una usque ad 
centum orationes et in nocte prope similiter ut etiam in silvis et monte 
manebam ante lucem excitabar ad orationem per nivem per gelu per 
pluviam et nihil mali sentiebam neque ulla pigritia erat in me sicut modo 
video quia tunc in Spiritus me fervebat. 



* I nee rt us liber. 



Ill APPENDIX. 

t 

£( ibi scilicet quadam nocte in somno audivi vocem dicentem sibi 
mihi Bene jejunal ci to jejuna ns iturus ad patriam tuam. Et iterum post 
^Mululnm tempos andivi responsum dicentem mihi ecce navis tua parata 
est et non ermt prope sed forte habebat dnoenta milia passus et ibi nun- 
quam fueram nee ibi notum quenqnam de hominibus habebam. Et 
deinde postmodum conversus sum in fugam et intermissi hominem cum 
fueram sex annis. Et veni in virtu te Domini qui viam meam ad bonum 
dirigebat et nihil metuebam donee perveni ad navem illam. Et ilia die 
qua perveni profecta est navis de loco suo et locutus sum ut abirem unde 
navigarem com illis. Et gubernatori displicuit illi et acriter cum inter- 
rogatione respondit — Nequaqnam tu nobiscum adpetes ire. — Et cum 
luec audissem separavi me ab illis ut venirem ad tegoriolum ubi hos- 
pitabam et in i line re coepi orare et antequam orationem consummarem 
audivi unum ex illis et fortiter exclamabat post me Veni cito quia vocant 
te homines isti et statim ad illos reversus sum et cceperunt mihi dicere 
veni quia ex fide recipimus te fac nobiscum amicitiam quomodo volueris. 
Et in ilia die itaque repuli fugere mammellas eorum propter timorem 
Dei. Sed veruntamen ab illis speravi Venire in fidem Jesu Chris ti, quia 
Gentes erant. 

Et ob hoc obtinui cum illis et post triduum terram cepimus et viginti 
octo dies per desertum iter fecimus et cibus defuit illis et fames invaluit 
super eos. Etalio die coepit gubernator mihi dicere Quid Christiane tu 
dicis ? Deus tuus magnus et omnipotens est Quare ergo pro nobis orare 
non potes quia nosci fame periclitamur ? difficile enim unquam ut aliquem 
hominem videamus. Ego enim evidenter dixi illis convertimini ex fide 
ad Dominum Deum meam cui nihil est impossibile ut cibum mi t tat vobis 
in viam vestram usque dum satiamini quia ubique habundat illi. Et ad- 
juvante Deo, ita factum est ecce grex porcorum in via ante oculos nostros 
apparuit et multos ex illis interfecerunt et ibi duas noctes manserunt et 
bene refecti et canes eorum repleti sunt quia multi ex illis secus viam 
semivivi relicti sunt. Et post haec summas gratias egenmt Deo et ego 
honorificatus sum sub oculis eorum. Etiam mel silvestre invenerunt et 
mihi partem obtulerunt. Et unus ex illis dixit immolatitium est Deo 
gratias. Exinde nihil gustavi. Eadem vero eram dormiens et fortiter 
temptavit me Satanas quod memor ero quamdiu fuero in hoc corpore. 
Et cecidit super me veluti saxum ingens et nihil membrorum prsevalens. 
Sed unde mihi venit in spiritum ut Heliam vocarem et inter hoc vidi in 
caelum Solem oriri et dum clamarera Heliam viribus meis ecce splendor 
Solisillius decidit super me et statim discussit a me gravitudinem. Et 
credo quod a Chiisto Domino meo clamabat pro me et spero quod 



SANCTI PATRICII CONFES^IO. Hii 

sic erit in die pressures meae sicut in Evangelio inqnit Dotuinus Non vos 
estis.* 



Multos adhuc capturam dedi ea nocte prima itaque niansi cum illis 
responsum autem divinum audivi duobus autem mensibus eris cum illis 
quod ita factum est. Nocte ilia sexagensima libera vit me Dominus de 
manibus eorum. Etiam in itinere praevidit nobis cibum et ignem et sic- 
citatem quotidie donee decimo die pervenimus omnis sicut superius 
insinuavi viginti et octo desertum iter facimus et ea nocte qua pervenimus 
omnis de cibo vero nihil habuimus. 

Et iterum post paucos annos in Britannis eram cum parentibus meis 
qui me ut filium susceperunt et ex fide rogaverunt me ut vel modo ego 
(post tantas tribulationes quas ego pertuli) nusquam ab illis discederem. 
Et ibi scilicet in sinu noctis virum venientem quasi de Hiberione cui 
nomen Victorious cum epistolis innumerabilibus vidi et dedit mihi unam 
ex his etlegi principium epistolae continentem Vox Hiberionacum. Et 
dum recitabam princip urn epistolae putabam enim ipse inimente audire 
vocem ipsorum qui erant juxta sylvara Focluti qua? est prope mare occi- 
cidentale. Et fie exclamaverunt Rogamus te sancte puer ut venias et 
adhuc ambulas inter nos. Et valde compunctus sum corde et valde am- 
plius non potui legere et sic expertus sum . Deo gratias quia post annos 
plurimos annos praestitit illis Dominus secundetn clamorem illorum. Et 
alia nocte nescio Deus scit utrum in me an juxta me verbis peritissime quos 
ego audivi et non potui intelligere nisi ad postremum orationis sic effi- 
ciatus est qui dedit animam suampro te ipse est qui loquitur in te. Et sic 
expectus sum gaudibundus. Et iterum vidi in me ipsum orantem et erat 
quasi intra corpus meum et audivi hoc est super interiorem hominem et 
ibi fortiter orabat gemitibus. Et inter haec stupebam et admirabam et 
cogitabam quis esset qui in me orabat. Sed ad postremum orationis, sic 
efficiatus est ut sit episcopus. Et sic expertus sum et recordatus sum 
Apostolo dicente Spiritus adjuvat injirmitates orationis nostra. Nam 
quod or emus sicut oportet nescimus, sed ipse Spiritus postulat pro nobis gemU 
tibus inenarrabiUbus, quae verbis exprimi non possunt. Et iterum Domi- 
nus advocatus noster postulat pro nobis. 

Vidi in visu noctis scriptum erat contra faciem meam sine honore. Et 
inter haec audivi responsum dicentem mihi male audivimus faciem de 



* Incertus liber. 



llV APPENDIX. 

signati nadato nomine nee sic pnedixit male vidisti sed male vidimus 
quasi sibi se junxisset sicnt dixit Quivos tanguit quasi qui tangit pupiUam 
ocuU met, Idcirco gratias ago ei qui me in omnibus confortavit ut non 
me impediret a profectione qua statueram et de mea quoque opera quod 
a Christo domino meo dedideram. Sed magis ex eo sensi virtutem npn 
parvam et fides mea probata est coram Deo et hominibus. Unde autem 
aadenter dico non me reprehendit conscientia mea hie et in futurum. 

Longum est autem totum per singula enarrare laborem meani vel per 
partes, Breviter dicam qualiter pissimus Deus de servitute ssepe libera- 
vit et de periculis duodecim qua periclitata est aniraa mea praeter insidias 
multas et que verbis exprimere non valeo nee injuriam legentibus faciam. 
Sed dum auctorem qui novit omnia etiam antequam fiant. Quia valde 
debitor sum Deo qui mihi tantam gratiam donavit ut populi multi per me 
in Deum renascerentur. Et ut clerici ubique illis ordinarentnr ad plebem 
nuper venientem ad credulltatem quia sumpsit Dominus ab Extremis 
Terra?, sicut olim promiserat per Prophetas suos. Sicut /also comparave- 
runt patres nostri idola et non est utiUtas gentes veniunt ad te. Et iterum 
Postui te lumen in Gentibus ut sis in saluiem usque ad extremutn terras* 
Et ibi volo expectare promissum ipsius qui utique nunquam fallit sicut in 
Evangelio pollicetnr. Venient ab oriente et occidente ah austro et ab aqui- 
tone et recumbent cum Abraham et Isaac et Jacob sicut credimus ab orani 
mundo venturi sunt credentes. 

Idcirco itaque oportet bene et diligenter piscare sicut Dominus prae- 
monet et docet dicens Venite post me et faciam vos fieri piscatores hominum. 
Et iterum mitto piscatores et venatores multos dicit Dominus, &c. Unde 
autem valde oportebat retia nostra tendere ita ut multitudo copiosa et 
turba Deo caperetur ut ubique essent Clerici qui baptizarent et exhor- 
tarent populum indigentem et desiderantem sicut Dominus in Evangelio 
ammonet et docet dicens Euntes ergo nunc docete omnes gentes baptizantes 
eas in nomine Patris et Filii et Spiritus sancti usque ad termmum seculi. Et 
iterum Euntes ergo in mundum universum predicate EvangeUum omni 
creature. Qui crediderit et baptizatus fuerit salvus eriU Qui vera non ere- 
diderit condemnabitur. 

Unde autem Hiberione qui nunquam notitiam habuerunt nisi idula 
et immunda usque semper coluerunt quomodo nuper facta est plebs 
Domini et filii Dei nuncupantur ? Filii Scottorum et filise Regulorum 
Monachi et virgines Christi esse videntur. 



SANCTI PATRICII CONFESSIO. lv 

Ecce teste m Deum invoco. in anirnam meam quia non mentior neque 
ut sit occasio vobis neque ut honorem spero ab aliquo vestro. Sufficit 
enim honor qui non mentitur. Sed video jam in prasenti seculo me supra 
modum exaltatus sum a Domino. £t non eram dignus neque talis ut hoc 
mihi prsestaret cum scio melius convenit paupertas et calamitas quam 
divitinet deliciae. Sed et Christus Dominus pauper fuit pro nobis. 

Ego vero miser et infelix et si opes voluero jam non habeo neque 
meipsum judico quia quotidie spero aut internecionem aut circumveniri 
aut redigi in servitutem sive occasio cujuslibet. 

Sed precor credentibus et timentibus Deum quicunque dignatus fuerit 
inspicere vel recipere hanc scripturam quam Patricius peccator (indoctus 
scilicet) Hiberione conscripsit ut nemo unquam dicat quod mea ignorantia 
si aliquid pusillum ego vel demonstraverim secundum* Sed arbitramini 
et verissime credatur quod donum Dei fuisset. Et heec est Confe$Ho mea 
antequam moriar. 

Hue usque volumen quod Patricius manu conscripsit sua septima 
decima Martii die translatus est Patricius ad ccelos. 



t% 



\ 



IRISH ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES. 



.'I 



IRISH 



ANTIQUARIAN RESEARCHES, 



BY 



SIR WILLIAM BETJIAM, F.S.A., L. 8, 

M.R.KA. A. U.S. Z.S. 



ULSTER KING OF ARMS OP ALL IRELAND, KEEPER OF THE RECORDi OF 

THE LATE PARLIAMENT OF IRELAND, DEPUTY KEEPER 

OF THE RECORDS IN BIRMINGHAM TOWER, IN HIS 

MAJESTY'S CASTLE OF DUBLIN, &C. &C. 



VOL. I. 



" Si Je veritate bcandaluin sumitur, utilius peimittitur nasci scandalum, quam 

ut Veritas relinuuatur." 

ST. AUGUSTINE. 



DUBLIN : 

WILLIAM CURRY, JUN. AND CO. 

AND HODGES AND M'ARTHUR; 

LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN, AND GREEN, LONDON ; 

DANIEL LIZARS, EDINBURGH. 

1827. 



* 



Bentham and Hardy, Printer! , 
Cecilia-street, Dublin. 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

INTRODUCTION, , 3 

Leabhar Dhtmma — Antient copy of the Gospels — 
Visitatio Infirmorum — Venerable Bede — Antient 
Irish Church — Memoir of the O'Carrols 39 

The Caah — Psalter of St. Columbkill — Memoir 
of the O'Donells , . 109 

The Meeshac 213 

Memoir of the Antient History of the Geraldines, 
the White Knight, the Knight of Glynn, and the 
Knight of Kerry 221 

Antient Letters and Documents of eminent Persons, 
with Autographs ...„ * 236 

Book of Armagh — Preliminary Discourse on the 
History of St. Patrick — Palladius, the second Pa- 
trick, and the Irish Church, &c. &c 2 13 

Translation of the Life of St. Patrick, from the Book 
of Armagh . . . . * 305 

Anonymous Notices, from same 345 

Sayings of St. Patrick, from same 346 

Tirechan's Collections, from same 348 

Summary of Aidus, from same 403 

Book of the Angel, from same 407 

Confession of St. Patrick, from same 417 

His Letter to Coroticus, from Sir James Ware .... 433 
Appendix, containing the original Latin of the Book 
of Armagh. 



PLATES. 



Page. 

PL \TK I. Elligie* of St. Matliow from Dimmu's MS. 50 

J I. Ditto of St. Mark, from same 52 

HI. Ditto of St. Luke, from same 54 

IV. Do. of the Emblem of St. John, from same 58 

V. Fac Simile of the beginning of the Gospel 

of St. John, from same. . . . To face the Title. 

VI . Dimma's Box 39 

VII. Top of the Caah, '. 109 

VIII. Fac simile from the MS. Psalter of St. 

Columbkill 112 

IX. Top of the Mceshac 213 

X. Emblems of the four Evangelists, at the 
beginning of the Gospel of St. Mat- 
thew, in the Book of Armagh 243 

XI. Fac similes from the JBook of Armagh : — 

No. 1 . The commencement of the Apo- 
calypse — Apocalypsi Jesu Chrisii, 

No. 2. The commencement of the Gos- 
pel of St. Matthew — Liber generati- 
onis Jesu Christ i 9 fyc. 

No. 3. The Pater Noster, in antient 
Greek Capitals — Pater Noster qui 
es in Co? I is, §c. 

No. 4. A Passage written in the pre- 
sence of Brien Boiromhe, in 100G. 

To face Title. 

XII. Fac similes from the Book of Armagh : — 

No. 1. Commencement of the Gospel 
of St. Mark — In it i urn Evangelii, fyc. 

No 2. The Irish passage concerning 
Aldus' s dedication of his collections. 

No. 3. Autograph of Florence Maire. 

No. 4. From the first chapter of St. 
Matthew's Gospel— XPi autem ge- 
neratio sic. $c 261 




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